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News About The Human Species
September 01, 2016
Smarter brains are blood-thirsty brains
Adelaide, Australia (SPX) Sep 01, 2016
A University of Adelaide-led project has overturned the theory that the evolution of human intelligence was simply related to the size of the brain - but rather linked more closely to the supply of blood to the brain. The international collaboration between Australia and South Africa showed that the human brain evolved to become not only larger, but more energetically costly and blood thirsty than previously believed. The research team calculated how blood flowing to the brain of human ancestors c ... read more

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Scientists think human ancestor Lucy fell from a tree
Scientists believe that 3.18 million years ago, a relatively young but mature adult female hominin fell from a tree in Africa and perished. Today, much of the world knows that hominin as Lucy, the most famous human ancestor. ... more
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Chimpanzees choose cooperation over competition
When given a choice between cooperating or competing, chimpanzees choose to cooperate five times more frequently Yerkes National Primate Research Center researchers have found. This, the resea ... more
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Revolutionary method to map brains at single-neuron resolution successfully demonstrated
Neuroscientists have published in the magazine Neuron details of a revolutionary new way of mapping the brain at the resolution of individual neurons, which they have successfully demonstrated in th ... more
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New research throws light on stone artifacts' use as ancient projectiles
A team of psychologists, kinesiologists and archaeologists at Indiana University and elsewhere are throwing new light on a longstanding archaeological mystery: the purpose of a large number of spher ... more
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New insights into the evolution of cooperation in spatially structured populations
Researchers have analyzed a new mathematical model to investigate how a population's spatial structure affects the evolution of cooperation. Jorge Pena of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary B ... more
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Large human brain evolved as a result of sizing each other up
Humans have evolved a disproportionately large brain as a result of sizing each other up in large cooperative social groups, researchers have proposed. A team led by computer scientists at Car ... more
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Most U.S. adults have vocabulary of more than 42,000 words
Traditionally, scientists have struggled to measure the size of adult vocabularies, but the surprising social media popularity of a recent vocabulary test has changed that. ... more
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More gorilla than chimp
A new study that for the first time examined the internal anatomy of a fossil human relative's heel bone, or calcaneus, shows greater similarities with gorillas than chimpanzees. The study, ti ... more
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Scientists decode sentence signatures among brain activity patterns
Neuroscientists are the University of Rochester are taking sentence diagramming to the next level. ... more
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Total number of neurons - not enlarged prefrontal region - hallmark of human brain
A new scientific study puts the final nail in the coffin of a long-standing theory to explain human's remarkable cognitive abilities: that human evolution involved the selective expansion of the bra ... more
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How did primate brains get so big
Virtual brains reconstructed from ancient, kiwi-sized primate skulls could help resolve one of the most intriguing evolutionary mysteries: how modern primates developed large brains. Universit ... more
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Archaeologists find Britain's last hunter-gatherers on small island
Human remains from the Late Mesolithic era - a period just prior to the introduction of farming - are nearly nonexistent in Britain. ... more
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Number of neurons makes human brain powerful, not structure
New research suggests the human brain isn't special. It's just a bigger, better primate brain. ... more
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UVic-led archeology team makes world-first discovery about early use of stone age tools
How smart were human-like species of the Stone Age? New research published in the Journal of Archaeological Science by a team led by paleoanthropologist April Nowell of the University of Victoria re ... more
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Researchers find evidence of animal butchering by Stone Age hominins
For the first time, researchers have discovered direct evidence of hunting and butchering of animals using stone tools by early hominins. ... more
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Fresh look at burials, mass graves, tells a new story of Cahokia
A new study challenges earlier interpretations of an important burial mound at Cahokia, a pre-Columbian city in Illinois near present-day St. Louis. The study reveals that a central feature of the m ... more
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Population boom preceded early farming
University of Utah anthropologists counted the number of carbon-dated artifacts at archaeological sites and concluded that a population boom and scarce food explain why people in eastern North Ameri ... more
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Tracking down the first chefs
Archaeological sites speak about the everyday lives of people in other times. Yet knowing how to interpret this reality does not tend to be straightforward. We know that Palaeolithic societies lived ... more
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The great evolutionary smoke out: An advantage for modern humans
A genetic mutation may have helped modern humans adapt to smoke exposure from fires and perhaps sparked an evolutionary advantage over Neandertals, according to a team of Penn State researchers. ... more
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Volunteers chew bones to help identify marks of earliest human chefs
Ancient archaeological sites are also often ancient paleontological sites, too. Animal bones found there may have been brought and deposited there by non-human predators. ... more
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Voice control in orangutan gives clues to early human speech
An adolescent orangutan called Rocky could provide the key to understanding how speech in humans evolved from the time of the ancestral great apes, according to new research. In an imitation " ... more
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1.7 million-year-old foot bone offers earliest evidence of malignant cancer
Cancer's roots lie deep in prehistory. Swartkrans cave, a rich archaeological site, has yielded a 1.7 million-year-old foot bone with a malignant tumor - the oldest evidence of cancer yet discovered by scientists. ... more
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Biologists home in on paleo gut for clues to our evolutionary history
For all the anxiety today about the bacteria in our gut being under constant assault by antibiotics, stress and bad diets, it turns out that a lot of the bacteria in our intestines have been with us ... more
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Early humans used mammoth ivory tool to make rope
Despite its technological importance to early hunter-gatherers, archaeologists know relatively little about the production and use of rope and twine during the Paleolithic Era. ... more
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