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News About The Human Species
November 28, 2016
The role of physical environment in the 'broken windows' theory
Chicago IL (SPX) Nov 22, 2016
For decades, the influential "broken windows" theory has linked signs of petty crime to bigger problems in a neighborhood. Largely left out of such discussions, however, is the role simple perceptual features in physical environments play in encouraging rule-breaking. In a new study, researchers at the University of Chicago explored whether mostly subconscious visual cues embedded in dilapidated buildings, overgrown lots and littered streets can fuel deviant behavior. The study, to be published in ... read more

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Satellite Services supplies on-board sub-systems for smallsats and microsats.
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Scientist uses 'dinosaur crater' rocks, prehistoric teeth to track ancient humans
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Genes for speech may not be limited to humans
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Traumatic stress shapes the brains of boys and girls in different ways
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Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison & Memory Foam Mattress Review
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24/7 News Coverage
NASA's ISS-RapidScat Earth Science Mission Ends

Study shows many lakes getting murkier, but gives hope for improvement

Increasing tornado outbreaks - is climate change responsible?

Loss of soil carbon due to climate change will be 'huge'

How the cold 1430s led to famine and disease

Going against the grain - nitrogen turns out to be hypersociable!

Where the rains come from

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Neanderthal inheritance helped humans adapt to life outside of Africa
As the ancestors of modern humans made their way out of Africa to other parts of the world many thousands of years ago, they met up and in some cases had children with other forms of humans, includi ... more
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Evolution purged many Neanderthal genes from human genome
Neanderthal genetic material is found in only small amounts in the genomes of modern humans because, after interbreeding, natural selection removed large numbers of weakly deleterious Neanderthal ge ... more
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The fate of Neanderthal genes
The Neanderthals disappeared about 30,000 years ago, but little pieces of them live on in the form of DNA sequences scattered through the modern human genome. A new study by geneticists at the Unive ... more
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Europeans and Africans have different immune systems, and neanderthals are partly to thank
It's long been clear that people from different parts of the world differ in their susceptibility to developing infections as well as chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Now, two studies r ... more
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Resilient 'risky-and-reliable' plant use strategy may have driven Neolithization in Jordan
A resilient dietary strategy balancing reliable wetland plants and "riskier" seasonal grasses may have driven adoption of the sedentary lifestyle which later became typical of Neolithic humans, acco ... more
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Study finds earliest evidence in fossil record for right-handedness
Perhaps the bias against left-handers dates back much further than we thought. By examining striations on teeth of a Homo habilis fossil, a new discovery led by a University of Kansas researcher has ... more
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Extensive heat treatment in Middle Stone Age silcrete tool production in South Africa
Humans living in South Africa in the Middle Stone Age may have used advanced heating techniques to produce silcrete blades, according to a study published October 19, 2016 in the open-access journal ... more
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Ancient human history more complex than previously thought
Relationships between the ancestors of modern humans and other archaic populations such as Neanderthals and Denisovans were likely more complex than previously thought, involving interbreeding withi ... more
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Monkeys are seen making stone flakes so humans are 'not unique' after all
Researchers have observed wild-bearded capuchin monkeys in Brazil deliberately break stones, unintentionally creating flakes that share many of the characteristics of those produced by early Stone A ... more
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New tools identify key evolutionary advantages from ancient hominid interbreeding
Neanderthals. Denisovans. Homo sapiens. Around 50,000 years ago, these hominids not only interbred, but in some cases, modern humans may have also received a special evolutionary advantage from doin ... more
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Capuchin monkey observed making stone flakes in Brazil
Researchers have observed capuchin monkeys in Brazil making stone flakes similar to those made by early hominins for cutting and scraping. ... more
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Wild chimpanzee mothers teach young to use tools, video study confirms
The first documented evidence of wild chimpanzee mothers teaching their offspring to use tools has been captured by video cameras set to record chimpanzee tool-using activity at termite mounds in th ... more
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Female chimpanzees don't fight for 'queen bee' status
For wild chimpanzees, social status is more than just a matter of pride. High-ranking chimpanzees of both sexes usually have better access to food and mates, boosting chances of survival for themsel ... more
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Apes understand that some things are all in your head
We all know that the way someone sees the world, and the way it really is, aren't always the same. This ability to recognize that someone's beliefs may differ from reality has long been seen as uniq ... more
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Mapping the 'dark matter' of human DNA
Researchers from ERIBA, Radboud UMC, XJTU, Saarland University, CWI and UMC Utrecht have made a big step towards a better understanding of the human genome. By identifying large DNA variants in 250 ... more
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Reading literary fiction doesn't boost social cognition
Literary fiction fans were quick to embrace news that the novels on their shelves bestowed a heightened social intelligence. The supposed link was uncovered by scientists at the New School in New York. Stories about the study were widely shared on social media platforms. ... more
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Space News from SpaceDaily.com
Could There Be Life in Pluto's Ocean?

Space freighter burns up after launch to to ISS: Russia

Moonwalker Buzz Aldrin stable after South Pole health scare

First Signs of Weird Quantum Property of Empty Space

New Perspective on How Pluto's "Icy Heart" Came to Be

XCOR Partners With Immortal Data To Enhance And Commercialize Shipslog Data Acquisition System

The Vega launcher is complete for next week's Arianespace mission with Gokturk-1

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World's first baby born from 3-parent technique: report
The world's first baby has been born using a controversial new technique by US scientists to include DNA from three parents in the embryo, said a report Tuesday. ... more
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UMass Amherst Research Traces Past Climate, Human Migration in the Faroe Islands
Raymond Bradley, Distinguished Professor in Geosciences and director of the Climate System Research Center at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others, recently received a two-year, $241 ... more
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Why Does Dying Cost More for People of Color
Dying in America is an expensive process, with about one in four Medicare dollars going to care for people in their last year of life. But for African-Americans and Hispanics, the cost of dying is m ... more
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Yes, Computing Genetic Ancestors is Super Accurate
Remnants of extinct monkeys are hiding inside you, along with those of lizards, jellyfish and other animals. Your DNA is built upon gene fragments from primal ancestors. Now researchers at the Georg ... more
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Belgium gets world's biggest pickled brain collection
A new collection in the psychiatric hospital of Duffel in the north of Belgium makes for a ghoulish sight: around 3,000 preserved brains that were originally saved by a British doctor. ... more
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Stone Age mummy still revealing secrets, 25 years on
When police heard about the frozen corpse up in the Alps in September 1991, they opened a criminal probe. Murder it was, but the crime was rather old - and the ultimate cold case. ... more
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How did prehistoric humans occupy the Tibetan Plateau?
The Tibetan Plateau, as the Earth's third pole, has long been of interest to many, especially in relation to its human history. Over the last few decades our understanding of the history of human oc ... more
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Smarter brains are blood-thirsty brains
A University of Adelaide-led project has overturned the theory that the evolution of human intelligence was simply related to the size of the brain - but rather linked more closely to the supply of ... more
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