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News About The Human Species
September 03, 2014
War between bacteria and phages benefits humans
Boston MA (SPX) Sep 03, 2014
In the battle between our immune systems and cholera bacteria, humans may have an unknown ally in bacteria-killing viruses known as phages. In a new study, researchers from Tufts University, Massachusetts General Hospital, Partners In Health, Haiti's National Public Health Laboratory, and elsewhere, report that phages can force cholera bacteria to give up their virulence in order to survive. Importantly, the study - published in eLife - found that cholera's mutational escape from phage predation o ... read more

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Satellite Services supplies on-board sub-systems for smallsats and microsats.
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Extinctions during human era worse than thought
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Scientists find possible neurobiological basis for tradeoff between honesty, self-interest
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Archaeologists discover Neanderthal cave art in Gibraltar
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Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison & Memory Foam Mattress Review
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24/7 News Coverage
War between bacteria and phages benefits humans

Russian Scientists Develop Patent Technology for Unique Flu Vaccine

Underwater grass comeback bodes well for Chesapeake Bay

Plant Life Forms in the Fossil Record: When Did the First Canopy Flowers Appear?

Chinese scientists' team efforts in dissecting rice complex agronomic traits in recent years

A new way to diagnose malaria

Extinctions during human era worse than thought

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DNA shows Arctic group's isolation lasted 4,000 years
A long-gone group of ancient people known as Paleo-Eskimos lived in isolation in the North American Arctic for more than 4,000 years, said a study on Thursday. ... more
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The roots of human altruism
Scientists have long been searching for the factor that determines why humans often behave so selflessly. It was known that humans share this tendency with species of small Latin American primates o ... more
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Stone-tipped spears lethal, may indicate early cognitive and social skills
Attaching a stone tip on to a wooden spear shaft was a significant innovation for early modern humans living around 500,000 years ago. However, it was also a costly behavior in terms of time and eff ... more
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A long childhood feeds the hungry human brain
A five-year old's brain is an energy monster. It uses twice as much glucose (the energy that fuels the brain) as that of a full-grown adult, a new study led by Northwestern University anthropologist ... more
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SA's Taung Child's skull and brain not human-like in expansion
The Taung Child, South Africa's premier hominin discovered 90 years ago by Wits University Professor Raymond Dart, never seizes to transform and evolve the search for our collective origins. B ... more
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Gamblers have greedy birdbrains, new study suggests
According to psychologists at Warwick University, in the United Kingdom, the risky decisions that gamblers make are similar to the tendencies of greedy pigeons. ... more
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Japanese 111-year-old becomes oldest man
A Japanese man born months before the Wright brothers carried out the first human flight was recognised Wednesday as the world's oldest male at the age of 111. ... more
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Neanderthals and humans interacted for thousands of years
A new study from Oxford University reveals Neanderthals and humans interacted for up to 5,000 years, 10 times longer than previously thought. ... more
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Science team criticizes adoption of 'novel ecosystems' by policymakers
Embracing "novel" ecosystems is dangerous, according to a new study by an international team. Novel ecosystems arise when human activities transform biological communities through species invasions ... more
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8,000-year-old mutation key to human life at high altitudes
In an environment where others struggle to survive, Tibetans thrive in the thin air on the Tibetan Plateau, with an average elevation of 14,800 feet. A University of Utah led discovery that hinged a ... more
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Flores bones evidence of Down syndrome, not new species
In 2004, archaeologists found the remains of an ancient human in Flores, Indonesia, that some suggested was proof of a new species - a relative of early man known as Homo floresiensis and dubbed the "hobbit." ... more
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6,500-year-old human skeleton found in museum storage
Clean out your closets, people! Every week, there's a new story about someone finding something remarkable in their storage closets - one week it's prehistoric amber, another time it's smallpox vials, and now it's 6,500-year-old human remains. ... more
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Engineering a protein to prevent brain damage from toxic agents
Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous chemicals-particularly those in pesticides an ... more
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OkCupid admits toying with users to find love formula
OkCupid on Monday said it messed with members' minds a bit in a bid to refine the formula for finding love at the online matchmaking service. ... more
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China's ageing millions look forward to bleak future
As she nears retirement along with millions of other Chinese, He Xiangying is too busy sending her son money and raising a stranger's child to worry about who will eventually look after her. ... more
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Study cracks how the brain processes emotions
Although feelings are personal and subjective, the human brain turns them into a standard code that objectively represents emotions across different senses, situations and even people, reports a new ... more
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Space News from SpaceDaily.com
Titan's subsurface reservoirs modify methane rainfall

Science and Departure Preps for Station Crew

NASA Invites Public to Submit Messages for Asteroid Mission Time Capsule

Putin Approves Developing Super-Heavy Rockets With Up to 150-Ton Cargo Capacity

Algal Growth a Blooming Problem Space Station to Help Monitor

Lockheed Martin-Built gps IIR/IIR-M satellites reach 200 years of combined operational life

Russia's Space Geckos Die Due to Technical Glitch Two Days Before Landing

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Neandertal trait raises new questions about human evolution
Re-examination of a circa 100,000-year-old archaic early human skull found 35 years ago in Northern China has revealed the surprising presence of an inner-ear formation long thought to occur only in ... more
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Low back pain? Don't blame the weather
Australian researchers reveal that sudden, acute episodes of low back pain are not linked to weather conditions such as temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation. Finding ... more
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Virtual crowds produce real behavior insights
William Warren's research group is advancing virtual reality technology in the service of studying the science of the swarm: how patterns of crowd movement emerge from individual behaviors. He descr ... more
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Insect diet helped early humans build bigger brains
Figuring out how to survive on a lean-season diet of hard-to-reach ants, slugs and other bugs may have spurred the development of bigger brains and higher-level cognitive functions in the ancestors ... more
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Researchers say hormonal mechanism responsible for left-handedness
The vast majority of humans are right-handed. Only about ten percent are left-hand dominant. But what causes the ten percent to prefer their opposite set of digits? Scientists have long traded theories on the matter and argued whether genetics are at play. ... more
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Adaptations of Tibetans may have benefited from extinct denisovans
An international team, led by researchers from BGI and University of California, presented their latest significant finding that the altitude adaptation in Tibet might be caused by the introgression ... more
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Smithsonian scientist and collaborators revise timeline of human origins
Many traits unique to humans were long thought to have originated in the genus Homo between 2.4 and 1.8 million years ago in Africa. Although scientists have recognized these characteristics for dec ... more
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Extinct human cousin gave Tibetans advantage at high elevation
Tibetans were able to adapt to high altitudes thanks to a gene picked up when their ancestors mated with a species of human they helped push to extinction, according to a new report by University of ... more
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