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News About The Human Species
August 18, 2015
Study: Apes may not be that far away from talking
Madison, Wis. (UPI) Aug 13, 2015
Ever since the 1940s, when a couple attempting to raise a pair of chimpanzees like children failed to impart the ability of speech, scientists have assumed language to be a uniquely human evolutionary adaptation. The thinking went that apes have little to no control over vocalizations and breathing-related behaviors. What sounds they do make, researchers posited, are largely involuntary - a reflexive reaction to their environment. But a new study by Marcus Perlman, now a postdoctoral re ... read more

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Wild bonobos show similarities to development of human speech
From an early age, human infants are able to produce vocalisations in a wide range of emotional states and situations - an ability felt to be one of the factors required for the development of langu ... more
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Take a trip through the brain
A new imaging tool developed by Boston scientists could do for the brain what the telescope did for space exploration. In the first demonstration of how the technology works, published July 30 in th ... more
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Body size increase did not play a role in the origins of Homo genus
A new analysis of early hominin body size evolution led by a George Washington University professor suggests that the earliest members of the Homo genus (which includes our species, Homo sapiens) ma ... more
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An all-natural sunscreen derived from algae
For consumers searching for just the right sunblock this summer, the options can be overwhelming. But scientists are now turning to the natural sunscreen of algae - which is also found in fish slim ... more
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It don't mean a thing if the brain ain't got that swing
Like Duke Ellington's 1931 jazz standard, the human brain improvises while its rhythm section keeps up a steady beat. But when it comes to taking on intellectually challenging tasks, groups of neuro ... more
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Swipe right: dating apps change US courtship rituals
From adulterous middle-aged marrieds to millennials who say only freaks chat up people in bars, millions of Americans are finding love online as technology corners the market in romance. ... more
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For dating apps in Asia, love by numbers or chaperone
Move over Tinder - a crop of dating apps in smartphone-addicted Asia is offering to recruit friends for group dates or send along a chaperone to steer the course of romance. ... more
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Isolated indigenous group reaches out in Peru's Amazon
Members of an isolated indigenous group made contact over the weekend with villagers in Peru's Amazon basin seeking food and supplies, a Lima newspaper reported Monday. ... more
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4-year-olds don't care much for crummy prizes
Preschoolers don't care how hard they worked to win a prize. If it's a lame reward, it's likely to go in the garbage. But with age, research shows, kids learn to appreciate the work an uninspiring prize symbolizes. ... more
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Evidence of cultural diversification between neighboring chimp communities
For centuries it has been thought that culture is what distinguishes humans from other animals, but over the past decade this idea has been repeatedly called into question. Cultural variation has be ... more
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Researchers to discover first evidence of farming in Mideast
Until now, researchers believed farming was "invented" some 12,000 years ago in the Cradle of Civilization - Iraq, the Levant, parts of Turkey and Iran - an area that was home to some of the earlies ... more
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Archaeologists reexplore move from hunting, gathering to farming
One of the enduring mysteries of the human experience is how and why humans moved from hunting and gathering to farming. From their beginnings humans, like other mammals, depended on wild resources ... more
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Genetic studies link indigenous peoples in the Amazon and Australasia
Native Americans living in the Amazon bear an unexpected genetic connection to indigenous people in Australasia, suggesting a previously unknown wave of migration to the Americas thousands of years ... more
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The population history of Native Americans
There is archaeological evidence of modern humans in the Americas by ca. 15 thousand years ago (KYA). However, there is still debate over exactly when and how many times the ancestors of present-day ... more
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Genome analysis pins down arrival and spread of first Americans
The original Americans came from Siberia in a single wave no more than 23,000 years ago, at the height of the last Ice Age, and apparently hung out in the north - perhaps for thousands of years - be ... more
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Study: Poverty does lasting damage to a child's brain
The most long-lasting scars of childhood poverty may not be visible to the naked eye. New research suggests they are buried deep in the brain tissue of a child. ... more
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Space News from SpaceDaily.com
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Study: Subject experts have tendency to "overclaim" false information
Self-proclaimed subject matter experts are more likely to fall victim to the illusion of knowledge. According to new research, experts are likely to "overclaim" false facts and made-up information. ... more
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Continued destruction of Earth's plant life places humans in jeopardy
Unless humans slow the destruction of Earth's declining supply of plant life, civilization like it is now may become completely unsustainable, according to a paper published recently by University o ... more
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Fossils indicate human activities have disturbed ecosystem resilience
A collection of fossilized owl pellets in Utah suggests that when the Earth went through a period of rapid warming about 13,000 years ago, the small mammal community was stable and resilient, even a ... more
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Indonesia jails orangutan trader caught with baby ape
An Indonesian orangutan trader has been jailed for two years after he was caught trying to sell a baby ape from a backpack, a rare conviction for wildlife crime in the country, authorities said Monday. ... more
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Neuroscientists establish brain-to-brain networks in primates, rodents
Neuroscientists at Duke University have introduced a new paradigm for brain-machine interfaces that investigates the physiological properties and adaptability of brain circuits, and how the brains o ... more
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Researchers find the organization of the brain is perfect
Have you ever wondered why the human brain evolved the way it did? A new study by Northeastern physicist Dmitri Krioukov and his colleagues suggests an answer: to expedite the transfer of informatio ... more
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World's oldest man dies at 112 in Japan
The world's oldest man, Sakari Momoi, has died in Japan at the ripe old age of 112, an official said Tuesday. ... more
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Study: Frustrated customers quicker to blame human brands
Is the Michelin Man - and similarly humanized brand icons - genius or flawed? Human-like mascots may attract customers, but new research suggest they also garner their companies blame when prices rise. ... more
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