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News About The Oceans of Earth
March 24, 2017
The foundation of aquatic life can rapidly adapt to global warming
Exeter, UK (SPX) Mar 23, 2017
Important microscopic creatures which produce half of the oxygen in the atmosphere can rapidly adapt to global warming, new research suggests. Phytoplankton, which also act as an essential food supply for fish, can increase the rate at which they take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen while in warmer water temperatures, a long-running experiment shows. Monitoring of one species, a green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, after ten years of them being in waters of a higher temperature shows they ... read more

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Water carriers in Madagascar bear brunt of global crisis
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Great Barrier Reef may never recover from bleaching: study
Australia's Great Barrier Reef may never recover from last year's warming-driven coral bleaching, said a study Wednesday that called for urgent action in the face of ineffective conservation efforts. ... more
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More salt water in Egypt's Nile Delta putting millions at grave risk
Increased human activity over the last few decades has slowly created a fresh water crisis that now looms for nearly 100 million people in Egypt, a scenario that scientists say could ultimately make the entire region uninhabitable by the end of this century. ... more
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Australia sees second year of Barrier Reef bleaching
Australia's Great Barrier Reef is experiencing an unprecedented second straight year of mass coral bleaching, scientists said Friday, warning many species would struggle to fully recover. ... more
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Study finds massive rogue waves aren't as rare as previously thought
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science scientist Mark Donelan and his Norwegian Meteorological Institute colleague captured new information about extreme waves, as o ... more
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More intense and frequent severe rainstorms likely; no drop off expected
A University of Connecticut climate scientist confirms that more intense and more frequent severe rainstorms will likely continue as temperatures rise due to global warming, despite some observation ... more
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Why did rainfall over Asian inland plateau region undergo abrupt decrease around 1999
The Asian inland plateau (AIP) is located in the East Asian monsoon marginal areas and mainly includes Mongolia and part of northern China. Covering arid and semi-arid regions, the climate variabili ... more
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