Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
24/7 News Coverage
February 16, 2017
ICE WORLD
New study explains decade of glacial growth in New Zealand



Victoria, New Zealand (UPI) Feb 15, 2017
Globally, glaciers have been on the retreat for several decades. Between 1983 and 2008, however, at least 58 New Zealand glaciers grew in size. Scientists have struggled to explain their advance, but new analysis suggest a regional climate anomaly, a period of unusually cold temperatures, encouraged their growth. "Glaciers advancing is very unusual - especially in this period when the vast majority of glaciers worldwide shrank in size as a result of our warming world," Andrew Mackintosh ... read more

EARLY EARTH
Fossil discovery rewrites understanding of reproductive evolution
A remarkable 250 million-year-old "terrible-headed lizard" fossil found in China shows an embryo inside the mother - clear evidence for live birth. Head of The University of Queensland's Schoo ... more
SHAKE AND BLOW
Quake-prone Pacific nations hold joint tsunami drills
Quake-prone countries around the Pacific Ocean Wednesday began a joint exercise testing their ability to deliver timely warnings of approaching tsunamis to tens of millions of people living along the coast. ... more
EARLY EARTH
MBL study illuminates the origin of vertebrate gills
What did the last common ancestor of the vertebrate animals - a very small, soft-bodied marine organism that lived about 600 million years ago - look like? While the portrait is still emerging, a ne ... more
FROTH AND BUBBLE
Deaths from India air pollution rival China: study
India's air now rivals China's as the world's deadliest, according to a new study published Tuesday amid warnings that efforts to curb pollution from coal will not yield results any time soon. ... more
Previous Issues Feb 15 Feb 14 Feb 13 Feb 11 Feb 10
24/7 News Coverage

Space Media Advertising Solutions
Integrated Air and Missile Defense 2017 - Sept 27-29 - Washington DC
InterDrone 2017 Las Vegas - Sept 6-8
Nuclear decommissioning and used fuel market map 2017
Nuclear Plant Digitalization Conference -November 2017, Charlotte, NC USA

Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison & Memory Foam Mattress Review
FROTH AND BUBBLE
Israel court puts off deadline for emptying toxic tank
An Israeli court Wednesday postponed the deadline for a container in Haifa capable of holding 12,000 tonnes of ammonia to be emptied of its toxic content, judicial sources said. ... more
FROTH AND BUBBLE
Miners protest Philippine plan to cancel 75 contracts
Mining firms in the Philippines voiced outrage Wednesday over government plans to cancel nearly one quarter of the nation's contracts, plus a permit to exploit one of the world's largest known copper deposits. ... more
FROTH AND BUBBLE
EU emits 'final warning' to Britain, France on air pollution
The EU ordered five member countries including Britain, France and Germany to tighten controls on smog-causing car pollution or risk being sent to the top European court. ... more
SHAKE AND BLOW
Italy asks EU aid as cost of quakes hits 23 bn euros
A series of deadly earthquakes that struck central Italy over the past six months has cost the country more than 23 billion euros ($24.3 billion), the nation's Civil Protection Agency said Wednesday. ... more
SHAKE AND BLOW
Cyclone bears down on Mozambique coast
Mozambique braced for flooding, high winds, sea surges and evacuations on Wednesday as Cyclone Dineo neared the coast, with forecasters predicting widespread damage. ... more
SHAKE AND BLOW
Ventura fault could cause stronger shaking
A new study by a team of researchers, including one from the University of California, Riverside, found that the fault under Ventura, Calif., would likely cause stronger shaking during an earthquake ... more


El Nino resulted in unprecedented erosion of the Pacific coastline

WHITE OUT
Heavy snowfall, longer duration, associated with higher risk of heart attack
People living in areas with winter snow may need to think twice before shovelling after a heavy snowstorm. According to a new study, snowfall is associated with a higher risk of hospital admission f ... more
FARM NEWS
Gluten-free diet may increase risk of arsenic, mercury exposure
People who eat a gluten-free diet may be at risk for increased exposure to arsenic and mercury - toxic metals that can lead to cardiovascular disease, cancer and neurological effects, according to a ... more
FLORA AND FAUNA
How evolution alters biological invasions
Biological invasions pose major threats to biodiversity, but little is known about how evolution might alter their impacts over time. Now, Rutgers University scientists have performed the first stud ... more
FROTH AND BUBBLE
New study helps explain how garbage patches form in the world's oceans
A new study on how ocean currents transport floating marine debris is helping to explain how garbage patches form in the world's oceans. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel Scho ... more

Space Media Advertising


Free hairdos to boost confidence of displaced Iraqi women
Twice a month, beautician Chnoor Khezri takes her equipment to a camp near Mosul and gives displaced Iraqi women who have lost everything a proper pampering and some fresh confidence. In a small room inside the camp, the young Iranian Kurd takes out her brushes and scissors and puts blue wax to heat up in a pot. "It's not much but I work miracles with this," she says. More than 3,600 wom ... more
Myanmar jade mine landslide kills 9: official

Justice for victims of Nepal's civil war slips away

Six cosmic catastrophes that could wipe out life on Earth

NASA and MIT collaborate to develop space-based quantum-dot spectrometer
A NASA technologist has teamed with the inventor of a new nanotechnology that could transform the way space scientists build spectrometers, the all-important device used by virtually all scientific disciplines to measure the properties of light emanating from astronomical objects, including Earth itself. Mahmooda Sultana, a research engineer at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbe ... more
NASA's TDRS-M space communications satellite begins final testing

Big data for the universe

Lasers could give space research its broadband moment

Ethiopia dam causes Kenya water shortage: rights group
A huge newly-built Ethiopian dam is cutting off the supply of water to Lake Turkana in northern Kenya, rights group Human Rights Watch said on Tuesday. The Gibe III dam, along with a network of sugar plantations, has caused the depth of Lake Turkana to drop by 1.5 meters from its previous levels since the dam's reservoir began filling in 2015, according to a HRW report. In one part of Tu ... more
El Nino resulted in unprecedented erosion of the Pacific coastline

Long-term eelgrass loss due to joint effects of shade, heat

Sheriff lifts evacuation order for residents near California dam

New study explains decade of glacial growth in New Zealand
Globally, glaciers have been on the retreat for several decades. Between 1983 and 2008, however, at least 58 New Zealand glaciers grew in size. Scientists have struggled to explain their advance, but new analysis suggest a regional climate anomaly, a period of unusually cold temperatures, encouraged their growth. "Glaciers advancing is very unusual - especially in this period wh ... more
NASA, UCI Reveal New Details of Greenland Ice Loss

Hidden lakes drain below West Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier

CryoSat reveals lake outbursts beneath Antarctic ice

Using high-resolution satellites to measure African farm yields
Stanford researchers have developed a new way to estimate crop yields from space, using high-res photos snapped by a new wave of compact satellites. The approach, detailed in the February 13 issue of the journal of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could be used to estimate agricultural productivity and test intervention strategies in poor regions of the world where data are c ... more
Gluten-free diet may increase risk of arsenic, mercury exposure

Grow, mow, mulch: Finding lawn's value

China villagers 'beat the Buddha' for a good harvest

Italy asks EU aid as cost of quakes hits 23 bn euros
A series of deadly earthquakes that struck central Italy over the past six months has cost the country more than 23 billion euros ($24.3 billion), the nation's Civil Protection Agency said Wednesday. The agency's report has been sent to Brussels as part of Italy's request to tap the EU Solidarity Fund to help pay for recovery efforts. The estimate includes damage to homes and other priva ... more
Cyclone bears down on Mozambique coast

Quake-prone Pacific nations hold joint tsunami drills

Ventura fault could cause stronger shaking

Integrated Air and Missile Defense 2017 - Sept 27-29 - Washington DC
S. Sudan army says general who quit was 'deeply' corrupt
South Sudan's army said Tuesday a general who quit after accusing President Salva Kiir and his tribe of "ethnic cleansing" was corrupt and had fled to evade arrest. Lieutenant-General Thomas Cirillo Swaka, then deputy chief of general staff for logistics, resigned last week accusing Kiir, aides and other army officers of violating a 2015 peace deal. They had "systematically frustrated th ... more
UN demands armed groups stop fighting in C. Africa

Ivory Coast arrests six journalists over mutiny 'false information'

I. Coast govt pursues bid to end mutiny by elite troops

Study: The human brain always has a backup plan
New research suggests when it comes to the physical movements of daily life, the human brain is always weighing its options and prepping for plan B. Think of the mini moments of hesitation that populate the day: Whether or not to cross the sidewalk or when to change lanes. During these seconds of indecision, the human brain is preparing the movements necessary for each potential action. ... more
Study links working remotely to more stress, insomnia

Chimpanzee feet allow scientists a new grasp on human foot evolution

Humans subconsciously perceive words as 'round' or 'sharp'

InterDrone 2017 Las Vegas - Sept 6-8
Gas hydrate breakdown unlikely to cause massive greenhouse gas release
The breakdown of methane hydrates due to warming climate is unlikely to lead to massive amounts of methane being released to the atmosphere, according to a recent interpretive review of scientific literature performed by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Rochester. Methane hydrate, which is also referred to as gas hydrate, is a naturally-occurring, ice-like form of methane and wat ... more
Scientists argue current climate change models understate the problem

Researchers say climate models understate risk, ignore human factors

Cape Town pools crack down on splashing as drought bites

Ancient Judea jars reveal earth's magnetic field is fluctuating, not diminishing
Albert Einstein considered the origin of the Earth's magnetic field one of the five most important unsolved problems in physics. The weakening of the geomagnetic field, which extends from the planet's core into outer space and was first recorded 180 years ago, has raised concern by some for the welfare of the biosphere. But a new study published in PNAS from Tel Aviv University, Hebrew Uni ... more
New data from NOAA GOES-16's instrument suite

NASA spacecraft prepares to fly to new heights

SpaceKnow raises $4 Million in Series A funding

NASA team looks to ancient earth first to study hazy exoplanets
For astronomers trying to understand which distant planets might have habitable conditions, the role of atmospheric haze has been hazy. To help sort it out, a team of researchers has been looking to Earth - specifically Earth during the Archean era, an epic 1-1/2-billion-year period early in our planet's history. Earth's atmosphere seems to have been quite different then, probably with lit ... more
Deeper origin of gill evolution suggests 'active lifestyle' link in early vertebrates

Fossil discovery rewrites understanding of reproductive evolution

MBL study illuminates the origin of vertebrate gills

Taiwan lantern makers go green for festival of lights
As Taiwan lights up for the start of its annual lantern festival this weekend, one eco-friendly craftsman is breaking with tradition. Lantern-maker Lin Chow-chin is part of a growing movement on the island to make the celebrations greener, creating sustainable lights which can be converted into everything from desk lamps to flower vases. Each year huge electric sculptures go on display ... more
EU parliament backs draft carbon trading reforms

Republican ex-top diplomats propose a carbon tax

Electricity costs: A new way they'll surge in a warming world

Next-Gen batteries could provide power to microsatellites, cubesats
Sometimes good things come in very small packages. Just ask Dr. Luke Roberson, senior principal investigator for Flight Research within the Exploration Research and Technology Directorate at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Dr. Roberson is collaborating on research of a new solid-state battery prototype with Dr. Ryan Karkkainen, a composite material expert at the University of Miami ... more
UMD physicist improves method for designing fusion experiments

Accelerating low-carbon innovation through policy

The ultimate green technology

Animals who face tough early life live longer
Helicopter parents be warned, new research suggests early strife paves the way for longevity. Scientists at the University of Exeter measured the effect of early-life conditions on the longevity of male banded mongooses. Those that experienced difficult conditions in their first year of life tended to live longer than those born into nicer circumstances. Whether a mongoose's chil ... more
The firefly among fish

Geneticists reveal how parenting rewires the beetle brain

How evolution alters biological invasions

Subscribe free to our
newsletters via your





















Fear has made me stronger: Hong Kong bookseller
The disappearance of a Chinese billionaire from his Hong Kong hotel has brought back frightening memories for bookseller Lam Wing-kee, who also went missing in an ordeal that highlighted Beijing's tightening grip on the city. Lam is one of five Hong Kong publishers who vanished at the end of 2015 and resurfaced across the border in mainland China. He returned to Hong Kong on bail after eight ... more
Hong Kong police guilty over attack on democracy protester

Hole is where the heart is for Chinese cave dwellers

'Unfair' Hong Kong election sparks fresh democracy calls

Why nature restoration takes time
'Relationships' in the soil become stronger during the process of nature restoration. Although all major groups of soil life are already present in former agricultural soils, they are not really 'connected' at first. These connections need time to (literally) grow, and fungi are the star performers here. A European research team led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) has shown t ... more
Wetlands play vital role in carbon storage, study finds

Amazon forest was transformed by ancient people: study

Honduras manages to stall pine-munching bugs' march



Subscribe free to our newsletters via your



Buy Advertising Media Advertising Kit Editorial & Other Enquiries Privacy statement
The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement