. Earth Science News .

A glass of milk a day could benefit your brain
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Feb 01, 2012

Milk drinkers tended to have healthier diets overall, but there was something about milk intake specifically that offered the brain health advantage, according to the researchers.

Pouring at least one glass of milk each day could not only boost your intake of much-needed key nutrients, but it could also positively impact your brain and mental performance, according to a recent study in the International Dairy Journal.

Researchers found that adults with higher intakes of milk and milk products scored significantly higher on memory and other brain function tests than those who drank little to no milk. Milk drinkers were five times less likely to "fail" the test, compared to non milk drinkers.

Researchers at the University of Maine put more than 900 men and women ages 23 to 98 through a series of brain tests - including visual-spatial, verbal and working memory tests - and tracked the milk consumption habits of the participants.

In the series of eight different measures of mental performance, regardless of age and through all tests, those who drank at least one glass of milk each day had an advantage.

The highest scores for all eight outcomes were observed for those with the highest intakes of milk and milk products compared to those with low and infrequent milk intakes.

The benefits persisted even after controlling for other factors that can affect brain health, including cardiovascular health and other lifestyle and diet factors. In fact, milk drinkers tended to have healthier diets overall, but there was something about milk intake specifically that offered the brain health advantage, according to the researchers.

In addition to the many established health benefits of milk from bone health to cardiovascular health, the potential to stave off mental decline may represent a novel benefit with great potential to impact the aging population.

While more research is needed, the scientists suggest some of milk's nutrients may have a direct effect on brain function and that "easily implemented lifestyle changes that individuals can make present an opportunity to slow or prevent neuropsychological dysfunction."

New and emerging brain health benefits are just one more reason to start each day with lowfat or fat free milk. Whether in a latte, in a smoothie, on your favorite cereal, or straight from the glass, milk at breakfast can be a key part of a healthy breakfast that help sets you up for a successful day.

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend three glasses of lowfat or fat free milk daily for adults and each 8-ounce glass contains nine essential nutrients Americans need, including calcium and vitamin D.

Crichton GE, Elias MF, Dore GA, Robbins MA. Relation between dairy food intake and cognitive function: The Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study. International Dairy Journal. 2012; 22:15-23.

Related Links
Weber Shandwick Worldwide
All About Human Beings and How We Got To Be Here

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries


. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Japan's population to shrink two thirds by 2110
Tokyo (AFP) Jan 30, 2012
Japan's population is expected to shrink to a third of its current size over the next century, with the average woman living to over 90 within 50 years, a government report said Monday. The population is forecast to decline from the current 127.7 million to 86.7 million by 2060 and to tumble again to 42.9 million by 2110 "if conditions remain unchanged", the health and welfare ministry said ... read more

US Navy comes to rescue of Iranian fishing dhow

Radioactive water leak at Japan nuclear plant: report

Japan studies flora and fauna near Fukushima plant

N.Z. quake bill to approach $25 bn: central bank

Lynas shares surge after Malaysia approves plant

Malaysia approves Australian rare earths plant

Harnessing the predictive power of virtual communities

Congolese inventor puts African tablet on sale

Filmmaker sounds alarm over ocean of plastic

Warming in the Tasman Sea a global warming hot spot

Report Taps into Innovative Financing to Secure Future for Sustainable Water Infrastructure

UMass Amherst Ecologists among the First to Record and Study Deep-sea Fish Noises

Study may answer longstanding questions about Little Ice Age

Norway blocking China's access to Arctic

The Arctic is already suffering the effects of a dangerous climate change

What really happened prior to 'Snowball Earth'?

Biodiversity enhances ecosystems global drylands

Truckloads of Chinese rice enter N. Korea: activist

Overgrazed grasslands tied to locust outbreaks

S. America drought hits corn yields

'Atlantis' volcano gives tips for mega-eruptions

Tsunami debris survey launched northwest of Midway

Scores injured in Peruvian earthquake

Search goes on for thousands of Japan's tsunami missing

Tuareg rebels take Mali town after army pullout

African Union unveils Chinese-built headquarters

Sudan army frees 14 'kidnapped' Chinese: report

New AU headquarters marks strong China-Africa ties

Scientists decode how the brain hears words

Scientists decode brain waves to eavesdrop on what we hear

A glass of milk a day could benefit your brain

Making memories last


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement