. Earth Science News .

Aboriginals get new history
by Staff Writers
Copenhagen, Denmark (SPX) Sep 23, 2011

The study derived from a lock of hair donated to a British anthropologist by an Aboriginal man from the Goldfields region of Western Australia in the early 20th century. One hundred years later, researchers have isolated DNA from this same hair, using it to explore the genetics of the first Australians and to provide insights into how humans first dispersed across the globe.

In an exciting development, an international team of researchers have, for the first time, pieced together the human genome from an Aboriginal Australian. The results, now to be published in the international journal Science, re-interpret the prehistory of our species.

By sequencing the genome, the researchers demonstrate that Aboriginal Australians descend directly from an early human expansion into Asia that took place some 70,000 years ago, at least 24,000 years before the population movements that gave rise to present-day Europeans and Asians. The results imply that modern day Aboriginal Australians are in fact the direct descendents of the first people who arrived in Australia as early as 50,000 years ago.

The study derived from a lock of hair donated to a British anthropologist by an Aboriginal man from the Goldfields region of Western Australia in the early 20th century. One hundred years later, researchers have isolated DNA from this same hair, using it to explore the genetics of the first Australians and to provide insights into how humans first dispersed across the globe.

The genome, shown to have no genetic input from modern European Australians, reveals that the ancestors of the Aboriginal man separated from the ancestors of other human populations some 64-75,000 years ago. Aboriginal Australians therefore descend directly from the earliest modern explorers, people who migrated into Asia before finally reaching Australia about 50,000 years ago.

In showing this, the study establishes Aboriginal Australians as the population with the longest association with the land on which they live today. This research is presented with the full endorsement of the Goldfields Land and Sea Council, the organization that represents the Aboriginal traditional owners for the region.

New model for migration
The history of Aboriginal Australians plays a key role in understanding the dispersal of the first humans to leave Africa. Archaeological evidence establishes modern human presence in Australia by about 50,000 years ago, but this study re-writes the story of their journey there.

Previously, the most widely accepted theory was that all modern humans derive from a single out-of-Africa migration wave into Europe, Asia, and Australia. In that model, the first Australians would have branched off from an Asian population, already separated from the ancestors of Europeans.

However, this study shows that when ancestral Aboriginal Australians began their private journey, the ancestors of Asians and Europeans had not yet differentiated from each other. Once they did, some 24,000 years after the first Australians had begun their explorations, Asians and remnants of the ancestral Australians intermixed for a period of time.

The first humans were explorers
Professor Eske Willerslev from the University of Copenhagen, who headed the study, explains:

"Aboriginal Australians descend from the first human explorers. While the ancestors of Europeans and Asians were sitting somewhere in Africa or the Middle East, yet to explore their world further, the ancestors of Aboriginal Australians spread rapidly; the first modern humans traversing unknown territory in Asia and finally crossing the sea into Australia. It was a truly amazing journey that must have demanded exceptional survival skills and bravery."

The study has wide implications for understanding of how our human ancestors moved across the globe. So far the only ancient human genomes have been obtained from hair preserved under frozen conditions. The researchers have now shown that hair preserved in much less ideal conditions can be used for genome sequencing without risk of modern human contamination that is typical in ancient bones and teeth.

Through analysis of museum collections, and in collaboration with descendent groups, researchers can now study the genetic history of many indigenous populations worldwide, even where groups have recently moved about or intermingled.

Related Links
University of Copenhagen
All About Human Beings and How We Got To Be Here


Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries

. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

CT study of early humans reveals evolutionary relationships
London UK (SPX) Sep 22, 2011
CT scans of fossil skull fragments may help researchers settle a long-standing debate about the evolution of Africa's Australopithecus, a key ancestor of modern humans that died out some 1.4 million years ago. The study, to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, explains how CT scans shed new light on a classic evolutionary puzzle by providing crucial informat ... read more

Japan will share lessons of nuclear disaster: PM

Flammable gas detected in Fukushima pipe: TEPCO

Deaths From Extreme Weather Events Have Fallen 98 Percent Since the 1920s

Insurance market Lloyd's dives into red on catastrophes

Lehigh University ceramics researchers shed light on metal embrittlement

Samsung says 10 million Galaxy S II handsets sold

Apple argues iPad case in Australia tablet row

NASA says satellite will hit Earth Sept 23 US time

Egypt, Ethiopia mull Nile dams dispute

Myanmar stands firm on Myitsone dam

El Nino and the Tropical Eastern Pacific Annual Cycle Run to the Same Beat

Aquarius Yields NASA's First Global Map of Ocean Salinity

Chinese target Arctic with Iceland land deal: experts

Model provides successful seasonal forecast for the fate of Arctic sea ice

Putin touts Arctic Northeast passage

Understanding methane's seabed escape

If insurance companies pay out too often farmers will be threatened with ruin

Paraguay outbreak threatens farms, jobs

Philippines eats, sells biodiversity riches

Ugandans displaced by UK company landgrab: Oxfam

Pacific Hurricane Hilary swells to Category Four

More than 150 dead in Thai flooding: govt

Tropical Storm Philippe forms, no threat to land

Tropical Storm Ophelia forms, heads toward Caribbean

Guyana opposition warns foreign bauxite firms

Zambia's Sata tells Chinese investors to respect labour laws

Sierra Leone army chief urges political impartiality

China to build $439-million housing complex in Mozambique

Aboriginals get new history

Researchers use genome sequences to peer into early human history

Continents influenced human migration, spread of technology

CT study of early humans reveals evolutionary relationships

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2011 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement