Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



WATER WORLD
Acidification stops shrimp chorus
by Staff Writers
Adelaide, Australia (SPX) Mar 18, 2016


The snapping shrimp is the noisiest marine animal in coastal ecosystems facing silence. Image courtesy Tullio Rossi. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Snapping shrimps, the loudest invertebrate in the ocean, may be silenced under increasing ocean acidification, a University of Adelaide study has found. Published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the researchers report that under forecast levels of CO2 predicted to be found in oceans by the end of the century, the sound of snapping shrimps would be reduced substantially.

This is expected to have profound consequences for many species that rely on sound cues for information about the location and quality of resources (food, shelter, partners and potential predators). "Coastal reefs are far from being quiet environments - they are filled with loud crackling sounds," says Mr Tullio Rossi, PhD candidate in the University's School of Biological Sciences.

"Shrimp "choruses" can be heard kilometres offshore and are important because they can aid the navigation of baby fish to their homes. But ocean acidification is jeopardising this process."

The snapping shrimp is the most common and noisiest of the sound-producing marine animals in coastal ecosystems. They can produce sounds of up to 210dB through the formation of bubbles by the rapid closing action of their snapping claw, used as a warning sign to scare off predators and in their own hunting.

Mr Rossi, working with supervisor Associate Professor Ivan Nagelkerken and co-supervisor Professor Sean Connell in the University's Southern Seas Ecology Laboratories, measured the sound produced by shrimp in field recordings at natural CO2 volcanic vents at three different ocean locations and under laboratory conditions. They found substantial reductions in both the levels of sound produced and in the frequency of snaps.

"Our results suggest that this is caused by a change of behaviour rather than any physical impairment of the claw," says Associate Professor Nagelkerken.

"This outcome is quite disturbing. Sound is one of the most reliable directional cues in the ocean because it can carry up to thousands of kilometres with little change, whereas visual cues and scents are affected by light, water clarity and turbulence.

"If human carbon emissions continue unabated, the resulting ocean acidification will turn our currently lively, noisy reefs into relatively silent habitats. And given the important role of natural sounds for animals in marine ecosystems, that's not good news for the health of our oceans."


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of Adelaide
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
WATER WORLD
Major source of methanol in the ocean identified
Cape Cod MA (SPX) Mar 14, 2016
As one of the most abundant organic compounds on the planet, methanol occurs naturally in the environment as plants release it as they grow and decompose. It is also found in the ocean, where it is a welcome food source for ravenous microbes that feast on it for energy and growth. While scientists have long known methanol exists in the ocean, and that certain microbes love to snack on it, ... read more


WATER WORLD
US military personnel punished over Afghan hospital attack

After lifejacket art and border piano recitel, Ai Weiwei gets migrant haircut

On patrol with Macedonian troops at Europe's closed gate

Environment behind nearly quarter of global deaths: WHO

WATER WORLD
3D printer could soon make cartilage for knees, noses, ears

Research team documents design of wood-based polymers

Disney research takes depth cameras into high-accuracy 3-D capture

A foldable material that can change size, volume and shape

WATER WORLD
Governor insists there's blame to share on Flint water crisis

Boat mooring chains scour seagrass releasing CO2

Study says marine protected areas can benefit large sharks

Argentinian coast guard sinks Chinese fishing boat

WATER WORLD
Early Earth was colder than previously thought

Warming ocean water undercuts Antarctic ice shelves

Degrading underground ice could reshape Arctic landscape

NASA tracking the influence of tides on ice shelves in Antarctica

WATER WORLD
Fertilizer applied to fields today will pollute water for decades

Network of germ sleuths heads off nearly 276,000 foodborne illnesses a year

Pesticides affect bees' ability to locate flowers, drink nectar

US gives tentative OK to testing genetically modified mosquitoes

WATER WORLD
Pakistan rains leave 42 dead: officials

Japan's tsunami: Five things after five years

Pakistan rains leave 28 dead: officials

Heavy rain kills six in Oman, UAE: media

WATER WORLD
China and Gambia resume diplomatic ties: ministry

Bank of China gains foothold in Morocco

Nigeria's ex-defence chief raided staff salary funds to buy property, court told

Seven dead in clashes in Africa's oldest wildlife reserve in DR Congo

WATER WORLD
400,000-year-old fossils from Spain provide earliest genetic evidence of Neandertals

How the brain detects short sounds

Neanderthal diet: Only 20 percent vegetarian

Early human habitat, recreated for first time, shows life was no picnic




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement