. Earth Science News .




.
SHAKE AND BLOW
Flight chaos in Australia as ash cloud returns
by Staff Writers
Sydney (AFP) June 20, 2011

Airline passengers faced more frustration Tuesday as the Chilean ash cloud returned to Australia, forcing the cancellation of flights to Adelaide, Canberra and Sydney. The cloud, created by the eruption of the Puyehue volcano high in the Andes more than two weeks ago, has looped the globe and made its way back Down Under to wreak havoc again. Qantas has suspended services to and from the South Australian capital Adelaide, and will cancel flights to Canberra from midday local time (0200 GMT) and all Sydney routes from 3:00pm (0500 GMT). Its discount airline Jetstar has also called off Adelaide flights while Tiger Airways grounded its entire fleet, with services around Australia cancelled until at least 2pm. Virgin suspended all flights to Adelaide and Mildura. "Volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Puyehue Cordon Caulle volcano in Chile continues to cause flight disruptions to the Qantas network," Qantas said. "At Qantas safety is our first priority and a number of flights have been cancelled or re-routed to avoid the volcanic ash cloud." It added that its morning services from Sydney to Bangkok, London, Singapore and Frankfurt would fly, but international flights after 3pm were under review. Meteorologists said that while the ash had thinned during its travels around the world it was still clearly visible on satellite images and was travelling at an altitude of 8-13 kilometres, generally cruising level for aircraft. The cloud first entered Australian and New Zealand airspace just over a week ago, causing some airlines to ground all flights to affected areas while others chose to divert their planes under and around the plume. Ash poses a significant threat to aircraft because once sucked into engines it can be converted into molten glass as a result of the high temperatures and potentially cause an engine to fail. earlier related report
An ash cloud created by a volcanic eruption in Chile more than two weeks ago has prompted Australian airlines to suspend some flights after the plume looped the globe and returned Down Under.

The Puyehue volcano's activity has been steadily decreasing, allowing people to return to their homes in the Andes mountains, but the huge ash cloud it ejected is still floating over the southern hemisphere.

Qantas, Virgin and Tiger Airways all cancelled some flights to and from Adelaide scheduled for Tuesday after forecasters said the ash would drift over the South Australian capital at that time.

"It will obviously cause disruption, it will obviously prevent aircraft flying at the altitude of the cloud," Andrew Tupper, head of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre, said of the plume.

"How they (airlines) choose to cope with that is their decision."

Tupper said the cloud was about 2,000 kilometres (1,200 miles) offshore on Monday but was expected to cross the southeastern coast and affect Adelaide by early the following day. It is also likely to affect Melbourne, he said.

He said while the ash had thinned during its travels around the globe it was still clearly visible on satellite images and was travelling at an altitude of 8-13 kilometres, generally cruising level for aircraft.

"Although much of the ash that came around us last week has dissipated, the leading edge of it... is coming around for another shot," he said.

He added that it was too soon to know whether it would affect the country's busiest airport Sydney, but admitted the cloud would be an "uncomfortably close" distance of about 100 kilometres from the hub.

For now, Adelaide was the focus of the disruption, with Qantas cancelling services to and from the city, and to and from the South Australian town of Port Lincoln, scheduled for between 6:30am and 2:00pm Tuesday. Some Qantas flights leaving Adelaide prior to 6:30am would go ahead, the airline said.

"Qantas will continue to monitor the movement of the ash cloud and assess its impact on flight operations," it said. It did not say how many flights in total would be affected.

Virgin has also suspended all flights in and out of Adelaide on Tuesday, as well as the regional town of Mildura, due to the ash, and said it was watching the situation in Melbourne and Tasmania.

"Our main focus for the near future is looking at Melbourne and Tasmania," a spokesman for the airline said, adding that the chance of the ash affecting Sydney was a lot lower than for airports further south.

Tiger Airways also cancelled eight flights to and from Adelaide for Tuesday.

The ash cloud entered Australian and New Zealand airspace just over a week ago, causing some airlines to ground all flights to affected areas while others chose to divert their planes under and around the plume.

The ash disrupted the travel plans of tens of thousands of people in Australia and New Zealand, cancelling some travel across the Tasman Sea and affecting flights to Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth and Hobart.

Tupper could not say how long the new ash front would last, but said it would probably linger over any one place for only a day.

Ash poses a significant threat to aircraft because once sucked into engines it can be converted into molten glass as a result of the high temperatures and potentially cause an engine to fail.




Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
...
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries


SAfrican air traffic back to normal after ash cloud trouble
Cape Town (AFP) June 20, 2011 - Air traffic along South Africa's south coast returned to normal Monday after a volcanic ash cloud from Chile grounded dozens of weekend flights around tourist hotspot Cape Town, aviation officials said.

The cloud caused by a volcanic eruption in Chile two weeks ago saw the suspension of flights at airports in Cape Town, Port Elizabeth and East London, as well as one from Johannesburg to London, according to Airports Company South Africa.

"Everything is back to normal and on schedule," spokeswoman Deidre Hendricks said, adding the passenger backlog had been cleared by Monday.

About 25 flights were suspended in Cape Town alone, said the airport's general manager Deon Cloete.

Provincial tourism boss Alan Winde said authorities were continuing to monitor the cloud, which also disrupted flights in Australia on Monday.

The cloud has looped the globe since the eruption, but spared South Africa on its first pass, Winde said.

"It passed south of us the first time around, circled the globe, and entered our airspace the second time around after being pushed north by the cold front."

Ash poses a significant threat to aircraft because once sucked into engines, it can be converted into molten glass under the high temperatures and cause an engine to fail.





. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle



SHAKE AND BLOW
Chile lifts evacuation order as volcano quiets down
Santiago (AFP) June 19, 2011
Thousands of evacuated Chileans were allowed to return home Sunday two weeks after the eruption of the Puyehue volcano, which sent a huge ash cloud into the sky and disrupted air travel in the southern hemisphere. "The volcano's activity has been steadily decreasing, which allows us today to lift the evacuation order in the area and permit the 4,270 people who have been evacuated to return t ... read more


SHAKE AND BLOW
Moody's cuts Japan's TEPCO to junk status

TEPCO to open second Fukushima reactor building

No 'business as usual' as IAEA meets on nuclear safety

New Zealand quake costs climb

SHAKE AND BLOW
Using living cells as an invisibility cloak

Asian tech fair spotlights tablets, smartphones

Rare earth prices surge as China tightens grip

Japanese supercomputer becomes world's fastest

SHAKE AND BLOW
Oceans in distress foreshadow mass extinction

Fastest Sea-Level Rise in Two Millennia Linked to Increasing Global Temperatures

Baylor Study Finds Golden Algae Responsible for Killing Millions of Fish Less Toxic in Sunlight

Chile court blocks Patagonia dam project

SHAKE AND BLOW
Arctic snow harbors deadly assassin

Glaciations may have larger influence on biodiversity than current climate

Raytheon Completes Satellite Downlink in Antarctica for Critical Weather Systems

New map reveals giant fjords beneath East Antarctic ice sheet

SHAKE AND BLOW
Where have all the flowers gone?

Salivating over wheat plants may net Hessian flies big meal or death

Land barons seen behind Amazon activist killings

Pesticide Impact: Comparing Lab, Field-Scale Results

SHAKE AND BLOW
Beatriz nears hurricane strength off Mexico

Human Activities Emit Way More Carbon Dioxide Than Do Volcanoes

Flood-hit China braces for more storms

Andes resort struggles with volcanic ash

SHAKE AND BLOW
Sudan army 'to fight by all means' in border state

Abyei clashes 'resume' on Sudan's embattled border

UN condemns North Sudan offensive

Abyei clashes 'resume' on Sudan's embattled border

SHAKE AND BLOW
Walker's World: Here come the 'age wars'

Family genetic research reveals the speed of human mutation

Bones give peek at key evolutionary period

WHO: 1 billion disabled worldwide


Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
.

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2011 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement