Earth Science News  





. Brain Changes Significantly After Age Eighteen

For the study, Baird and graduate student Craig Bennett looked at the brains of nineteen 18-year-old Dartmouth students who had moved more than 100 miles to attend college. A control group of 17 older students, ranging in age from 25 to 35, were also studied for comparison.
by Staff Writers
Hanover NH (SPX) Feb 06, 2006
Two Dartmouth researchers are one step closer to defining exactly when human maturity sets in. In a study aimed at identifying how and when a person's brain reaches adulthood, the scientists have learned that, anatomically, significant changes in brain structure continue after age 18.

The study, called "Anatomical Changes in the Emerging Adult Brain," appeared in the Nov. 29, 2005, on-line issue of the journal Human Brain Mapping. It will appear in a forthcoming issue of the journal's print edition.

Abigail Baird, Assistant Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences and co-author of the study, explains that their finding is fascinating because the study closely tracked a group of freshman students throughout their first year of college. She says that this research contributes to the growing body of literature devoted to the period of human development between adolescence and adulthood.

"During the first year of college, especially at a residential college, students have many new experiences," says Baird. "They are faced with new cognitive, social, and emotional challenges. We thought it was important to document and learn from the changes taking place in their brains."

For the study, Baird and graduate student Craig Bennett looked at the brains of nineteen 18-year-old Dartmouth students who had moved more than 100 miles to attend college. A control group of 17 older students, ranging in age from 25 to 35, were also studied for comparison.

The results indicate that significant changes took place in the brains of these individuals. The changes were localized to regions of the brain known to integrate emotion and cognition. Specifically, these are areas that take information from our current body state and apply it for use in navigating the world.

"The brain of an 18-year-old college freshman is still far from resembling the brain of someone in their mid-twenties," says Bennett. "When do we reach adulthood? It might be much later than we traditionally think."

The study was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Development.

Related Links
Organisation For Human Brain Mapping
Dartmouth College

Blue Light May Fight Fatigue
Boston MA (SPX) Feb 06, 2006
Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Harvard Medical School have found that exposure to short wavelength, or blue light, during the biological night directly and immediately improves alertness and performance. These findings are published in the February 1 issue of Sleep.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Storm-Ravaged New Orleans Seeks To Reverse Social Ills
  • US Military To End Pakistan Relief Operation
  • Tsunami Victims' Rights Abused?
  • Disaster Convention Warned On Urbanisation Risk

  • Thousands Of Barges Could Save Europe From Deep Freeze
  • Research Flights Probing Ice Particles In Clouds
  • World's Temperature Second Highest On Record In 2005: Japan
  • Sat Portrait Of Global Plant Growth Will Aid Climate Research

  • Keeping New York City "Cool" Is The Job Of NASA's "Heat Seekers"
  • MSG-2 First Images
  • EADS Astrium To Supply Algeria's ALSAT-2 Optical Observation System
  • Daichi Returns To Normal Operation Conditions, Completes Critical Phase

  • Polymer Membranes For Hydrogen Purification Could Lower Production Costs
  • Brazil Seeks To Bolster Ethanol Sector
  • New Material Brings Hydrogen Fuel, Cheaper Petrochemicals Closer
  • China To Produce Gas From Disputed Field Soon

  • Flood Hit Mozambique Braces For Rise In Cholera Deaths
  • Seventeenth Avian-Flu Death In Indonesia
  • Hong Kong Bird Flu Finds Raise New Fears About China Reporting
  • In Indonesia, 2 More Flu Deaths Suspected

  • Antarctic Krill Provide Carbon Sink In Southern Ocean
  • Asian Elephant Nations Meet To Discuss Species' Survival
  • Identifying Whale Sharks Using Astronomical Star Pattern Recognition Program
  • Clay Major Contributor To Oxygen That Enabled Early Animal Life

  • Liberian-Flagged Ship Suspected Of Deadly Oil Slick Off Estonia
  • Pesticide Combinations Imperil Frogs
  • Chronic Oil Pollution Takes Toll On Seabirds Along SAmerican Coast
  • French Nuclear Watchdog Gives Thumbs-Up To Deep Waste Burial

  • Brain Changes Significantly After Age Eighteen
  • Blue Light May Fight Fatigue
  • Study Suggests Why Neanderthals Vanished
  • New Technique Puts Brain-Imaging Research On Its Head

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement