Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




ABOUT US
Brain scans don't lie about age
by Staff Writers
London, UK (SPX) Aug 23, 2012


File image.

It isn't uncommon for people to pass for ages much older or younger than their years, but researchers have now found that this feature doesn't apply to our brains. The findings reported online on August 16 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, show that sophisticated brain scans can be used to accurately predict age, give or take a year.

It's a "carnival trick" that may have deeper implications for both brain science and medicine.

"We have uncovered a 'developmental clock' of sorts within the brain-a biological signature of maturation that captures age differences quite well, regardless of other kinds of differences that exist across individuals," says Timothy Brown of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

Together with UCSD's Anders Dale and Terry Jernigan and researchers from nine other universities, Brown used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to scan the brains of 885 people ranging in age from 3 to 20.

Those brain scans were used to identify 231 biomarkers of brain anatomy that, when combined, could assess an individual's age with more than 92 percent accuracy. That's beyond what's been possible with any other biological measure, the researchers say.

While others had looked at some of the same brain biomarkers in the past one by one, the key was finding a way to combine them to capture the multidimensional nature of brain anatomy and characteristic patterns of developmental change with age.

Brown says that they are excited to further explore the new approach and its potential for use in the clinic.

"The fact that we found a collection of brain measures that so accurately captures a person's chronological age means that brain development, or at least certain anatomical aspects of it, is more tightly controlled than we knew previously," Brown says.

"The regularity in this maturity metric among typically developing children suggests that it might be sensitive to detecting abnormality as well."

It's not yet clear how these anatomical changes in the brain will relate to maturity in terms of human behavior, which we all know isn't necessarily reflected by our chronological age.

"The anatomy and physiology of these dynamic, interacting neural systems, which we can probe in different ways with MRI scans, have to account for the changes we all observe in human psychological development," Brown says. "We're still figuring out exactly how."

Brown et al.: "Neuroanatomical assessment of biological maturity."

.


Related Links
Cell Press
All About Human Beings and How We Got To Be Here






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ABOUT US
Common parasite may trigger suicide attempts
East Lansing MI (SPX) Aug 23, 2012
A parasite thought to be harmless and found in many people may actually be causing subtle changes in the brain, leading to suicide attempts. New research appearing in the August issue of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry adds to the growing work linking an infection caused by the Toxoplasma gondii parasite to suicide attempts. Michigan State University's Lena Brundin was one of the lead researc ... read more


ABOUT US
Haiti demolishes quake-ruined presidential palace

Record radiation in fish off Japan nuclear plant

Raytheon mobile app allows first responders to use PCs, tablets and smartphones as "virtual radios"

US allows NGOs to send quake relief funds to Iran

ABOUT US
Scientists shed light on glowing materials

New space-age insulating material for homes, clothing and other everyday uses

Global tablet sales to top 100 million in 2012: survey

Next Generation 3-D Theater: Optical Science Makes Glasses a Thing of the Past

ABOUT US
Women could play key role in correcting crisis in clean drinking water and sanitation crisis

Nature study highlights many paths to ocean health

Dinosaur bends caused by prolonged diving

Researchers reveal behaviors of the tiniest water droplets

ABOUT US
Google online maps embark on Arctic adventure

Man partly to blame for Antarctic ice shelf collapse: study

Arctic cap on course for record melt: US scientists

First Chinese ship makes trip to Atlantic via Arctic route

ABOUT US
Russia to 'considerably' cut grain exports amid drought

Row escalates over sale of Burgundy estate to Chinese

UCSB scientists examine effects of manufactured nanoparticles on soybean crops

$15 million 'gutter oil' court case begins in China

ABOUT US
Heavy rain, floods kill 26 in Pakistan: officials

N. Korea to talk to S. Korean NGOs about flood aid

Haiti faces new tragedy as Storm Isaac swells

Forty-four killed since July in Niger floods: UN

ABOUT US
U.S. AFRICOM wants more guard partnerships

South Sudan's military chief Paulino Matip dies

Kenyan, Ugandan troops battle al-Shabaab

S.Africa police say mine killings were self-defence; 34 dead

ABOUT US
Once again with feeling: Australian science tugs heart-strings

Common parasite may trigger suicide attempts

Brain scans don't lie about age

Evolutionary increase in size of the human brain explained




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement