Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
Central Valley irrigation intensifies rainfall, storms across the Southwest
by Staff Writers
Irvine CA (SPX) Feb 04, 2013


File image.

Agricultural irrigation in California's Central Valley doubles the amount of water vapor pumped into the atmosphere, ratcheting up rainfall and powerful monsoons across the interior Southwest, according to a new study by UC Irvine scientists.

Moisture on the vast farm fields evaporates, is blown over the Sierra Nevada and dumps 15 percent more than average summer rain in numerous other states. Runoff to the Colorado River increases by 28 percent, and the Four Corners region experiences a 56 percent boost in runoff. While the additional water supply can be a good thing, the transport pattern also accelerates the severity of monsoons and other potentially destructive seasonal weather events.

"If we stop irrigating in the Valley, we'll see a decrease in stream flow in the Colorado River basin," said climate hydrologist Jay Famiglietti, senior author on the paper, which will be published online in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

The basin provides water for about 35 million people, including those in Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Phoenix. But the extra water vapor also accelerates normal atmospheric circulation, he said, "firing up" the annual storm cycle and drawing in more water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico as well as the Central Valley.

When the additional waves of moisture bump into developing monsoons, Famiglietti said, "it's like throwing fuel on a fire."

Famiglietti, an Earth system science professor in the School of Physical Sciences, and colleague Min-Hui Lo, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California Center for Hydrologic Modeling who is now at National Taiwan University, painstakingly entered regional irrigation levels into global rainfall and weather models and traced the patterns.

"All percent differences in the paper are the differences between applying irrigation to the Central Valley and not applying it," Famiglietti said. "That's the point of the study - and the beauty of using computer models. You can isolate the phenomenon that you wish to explore, in this case, irrigation versus no irrigation."

Famiglietti's team plans to increase the scope of the work to track how major human water usage elsewhere in the world affects neighboring areas too. A better understanding of irrigation's impact on the changing climate and water availability could improve resource management in parched or flooded areas.

.


Related Links
UC Irvine
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Groundwater fate and climate change
Burnaby, Canada (SPX) Feb 01, 2013
Simon Fraser University earth scientist Diana Allen, a co-author on a new paper about climate changes' impacts on the world's ground water, says climate change may be exacerbating many countries' experience of water stress. "Increasing food requirements to feed our current world's growing population and prolonged droughts in many regions of the world are already increasing dependence on gr ... read more


WATER WORLD
Sri Lanka rescues 138 stranded on sinking boat: navy

Munich Re says profits quadrupled in 2012

NGO ends Mozambique flood aid over graft: report

Fireworks truck blast blamed for China bridge collapse

WATER WORLD
South Korean Satellite Makes First Contact with Ground

Novel materials shake ship scum

Penn Research Shows Mechanism Behind Wear at the Atomic Scale

NTU research embraces laser and sparks cool affair

WATER WORLD
Furry crabs may be healing Great Barrier Reef

Central Valley irrigation intensifies rainfall, storms across the Southwest

Young dolphin lures pod to safety in Australia

UN delivers chemicals to treat water for 10 mn Syrians

WATER WORLD
Cyclone did not cause 2012 record low for Arctic sea ice

NSF-funded Team Samples Antarctic Lake Beneath the Ice Sheet

Norway's ruling party may back Arctic islands oil drive

Greenland ice cores provide vision of the future

WATER WORLD
In beef production, cow-calf phase contributes most greenhouse gases

New protocols measuring soil organic carbon sequestration

Brewer SABMiller says agrees to buy Chinese brewer

Going trayless study shows student impact

WATER WORLD
Six killed, three missing in Madagascar cyclone

Early warning saved the day for flood-prone Mozambique

Crocodiles a risk as Australian floodwaters recede

Powerful 6.9 earthquake shakes northern Japan

WATER WORLD
Sudan president in Eritrea after Asmara mutiny: reports

Central African rebels warn president over peace deal

DR Congo peace deal signing cancelled: UN

Troops and drones to bolster new UN Congo peace bid

WATER WORLD
Alternate walking and running to save energy, maintain endurance

Bionic man goes on show at British musuem

Primates too can move in unison

Professional training 'in the wild' overrides laboratory decision preferences




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement