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. China To Share Disaster Forecasting Information With Developing Countries

Frequent natural disasters and emergencies that have occurred in recent years have held back the economic and social development of some developing countries, including China. Despite the different constitutions of many developing countries, they have similar missions during and after natural disasters.
by Staff Writers
Beijing, China (XNA) Oct 04, 2007
China is willing to share its capabilities in disaster forecasting with developing countries to improve their ability to handle natural disasters, a minister said on Monday. The recent tsunami that occurred in the Indian Sea has highlighted a need for cooperation in monitoring and forecasting earthquakes, floods, typhoons and other disasters that hit developing countries, Li Xueju, Minister of Civil Affairs said at a conference in Beijing.

According to the minister, China is willing to share its remote sensing information by weather satellites and China Earthquake Network Center with other developing countries.

In addition, the ministry is planning to organize training courses to pass on its experiences in managing natural disasters for officials of developing countries.

"The ministry will sponsor a course in October to provide the officials with emergency management training during disasters," Li Xueju said.

Another course will be held by the ministry in November in which the officials will be trained in how to deal with the aftermath of natural disasters, Li added.

Austin Sichinga, permanent secretary of the office of the vice president of Zambia, said officials of the countries hit by disasters would be very interested to attend the courses.

The Republic of Zambia was severely hit by floods last year which have brought great economic and social losses to the country located in center of Africa.

Frequent natural disasters and emergencies that have occurred in recent years have held back the economic and social development of some developing countries, including China.

Despite the different constitutions of many developing countries, they have similar missions during and after natural disasters, Li Xueju said.

Wang Chao, assistant to the Minister of Commerce said with its own economic progress, China has a responsibility to help other countries.

"Although China is also a developing country, we will do our best to improve other countries' abilities to reduce the impact of disasters," the minister said.

More than 50 government officials from developing countries have attended the week-long conference held by the ministry in which officials shared disaster management experiences.

Source: Xinhua News Agency

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