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China mudslides leave 127 dead, 2,000 missing

More than 2,100 dead, missing in China floods
Beijing (AFP) Aug 7, 2010 - The number of people killed or missing in devastating floods across China this year has risen to more than 2,100, according to the government, as weather authorities warn of yet more rain. The nation's civil affairs ministry said late Friday 1,454 people had died in floods this year, another 669 were still missing and more than 12 million had been evacuated from their homes. Large swathes of China have been hit by summer deluges that have triggered the worst floods in a decade, caused countless deadly landslides and swollen many large rivers to dangerous levels.

According to the ministry, 1.4 million homes have been destroyed by the floods that have also caused 275 billion yuan (41 billion dollars) in direct economic losses. These official figures cover the entire year so far, and it is therefore unclear how many people have died or gone missing in the more recent, summer floods. China's northeast is currently the worst-hit area, with entire towns flooded and rivers bordering North Korea swollen to critical levels, prompting fears of inundations in both countries. China's national meteorological centre said Saturday that large swathes of the nation would see rain in the next 24 hours, although it added the rainfall would be light in most areas. But it warned that the northeast would once again be hit by torrential downpours from Sunday.
by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) Aug 8, 2010
At least 127 people were killed and 2,000 missing Sunday after mudslides swept away homes and destroyed roads in northwestern China as the nation battled its worst flooding in a decade.

At least one village was buried entirely and deep rivers of sludge and rocks were hampering rescue efforts in the devastated region of Gansu province, where more than 20,000 people have been evacuated, state media said.

Authorities have sent nearly 3,000 soldiers and about 100 medics to help in search and rescue efforts after the landslides in the remote ethnically Tibetan region, triggered by a deluge of rain late Saturday.

Premier Wen Jiabao arrived in the mountainous region on Sunday after he and President Hu Jintao urged rescuers -- some using their bare hands -- to spare no effort to save lives in the latest natural disaster to strike the country.

At least 50,000 people have been affected by floods which submerged half of Zhouqu county at one point, the official Xinhua news agency said, citing Mao Shengwu, head of the affected Gannan prefecture.

The landslides swept mud, houses, cars and other debris into a river running through the county, blocking the waterway and triggering flooding in the valley, the government said.

One village was buried as floodwaters reached as high as three storeys at one point, Xinhua said.

State television broadcast images of local residents walking through streets clogged with mud and debris and pictures of buildings swept off their foundations or destroyed by the mudslides and flooding.

Other images showed buildings and vehicles partly submerged by muddy water and soldiers frantically shovelling mud as they searched for the missing. Reports said more than 680 people had been rescued so far, including five who had been stranded on top of a building.

So far rescuers have not been able to use heavy machinery because of the sludge, relying instead on shovels and their bare hands to search for survivors, Xinhua said.

Reports said 76 people had also been injured.

Torrential rains that started Saturday had now stopped, reports said, but the local weather bureau has forecast more heavy rain in the upper reaches of the Bailong River on Tuesday and Wednesday.

"The water of the Bailong River flowed into the county seat and many people were trapped," said Diemujiangteng, the head of Zhouqu county.

"Now the sludge has become the biggest problem to rescue operations. It's too thick to walk or drive through."

Some streets were covered with sludge as deep as one metre (three feet), Xinhua said.

As many as 300 houses were buried in the landslides which destroyed roads and bridges while telecommunications, water, electricity and transport links have been cut in the region.

"Someone said the fifth floor of my residential building has been submerged. People are busy looking for their family members and friends," local resident Li Tiankui was quoted by Xinhua as saying.

According to government figures issued before the latest disaster, the number of people killed or missing in floods across China this year has risen to more than 2,100.

China's civil affairs ministry said Friday more than 12 million had been evacuated from their homes.

Large swathes of China have been hit by summer deluges that have triggered the worst floods in a decade, caused countless deadly landslides and swollen many large rivers to dangerous levels.

According to the ministry, 1.4 million homes have been destroyed by the floods that have also caused 275 billion yuan (41 billion dollars) in direct economic losses for the year.

China's northeast is the worst-hit area, with entire towns flooded and rivers bordering North Korea swollen to critical levels, prompting fears of deluges in both countries.

In North Korea, floods had also washed away homes, roads, railways and farmland in the deeply impoverished nation, state media said, but gave no casualty figures.

In August 2007, that country's worst floods in a decade left at least 600 people dead or missing.




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Pakistan PM calls for help as fresh rains hamper flood aid
Tori Band, Pakistan (AFP) Aug 8, 2010
Fresh rains lashed flood-hit Pakistan Sunday, hampering aid efforts and threatening to deepen a crisis affecting 15 million people in the country's worst ever floods. Helicopters were grounded in the northwest while rescuers rushed to evacuate families in the poor southern farming belt of Sindh, where officials were readying for a deluge that could burst the banks of the swollen Indus river. ... read more

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