Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















ABOUT US
China's elderly live longer, but are less fit: study
by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP) March 9, 2017


The number and proportion of people in China over 80 are growing, but their mental and physical fitness appear to be declining, scientists reported Friday.

Comparing medical data and surveys from 1998 and 2008 of nearly 20,000 people aged 80 to 105, researchers found that the ranks of China's 'oldest old' had expanded since the turn of the century.

For octogenarians and nonagenarians, mortality fell by nearly one percent over that decade, they reported in the medical journal The Lancet.

For the 100-and-up club, death rates dropped nearly three percent.

The 'over 80' cohort is by far the fastest rising age group in the country.

At the same time, however, physical and cognitive function showed a small but significant deterioration.

Simple tasks -- standing up from a chair, for example, or picking up a book off the floor -- were harder to perform, while scores on memory tests slumped.

"This has clear policy implications for health systems and social care, not only in China but also globally," the authors concluded.

"Many more state-subsidised public and private programmes and enterprises are urgently needed to provide services to meet the needs of the rapidly growing elderly population," especially those over 80.

Paradoxically, the 2008 respondents reported less difficulty in performing daily activities -- such as eating, dressing and bathing -- than those born a decade earlier.

The scientists, led by Yi Zeng, a professor at the National School of Development at Beijing University, chalked this up to improved amenities and tools, but said more research was needed.

The findings illustrate the tug-of-war between two approaches to assessing ageing populations, whether in rich or developing countries.

One emphasises the "benefits of success": people living longer with lower levels of disability because of healthier lifestyles, better healthcare and higher incomes.

By contrast, the "cost of success" theory suggests that living longer might mean that individuals survive life-threatening illnesses but live with chronic health problems as a result.

The new study shows that both theories are at play, and that governments will need to adapt under either scenario.

"The findings provide a clear warning message to societies with ageing populations," Yi said in a statement.

"Although lifespans are increasing, other elements of health are both improving and deteriorating, leading to a variety of health and social needs in the oldest-old population."

Whether it means providing long-term care for the disabled, or work and social opportunities for healthy octogenarians, adjusting to an ageing population will require planning and investment, the researchers concluded.

ABOUT US
Dartmouth study finds modern hunter-gathers relocate to maximize foraging efficiency
Hanover NH (SPX) Mar 07, 2017
As bumblebees forage for nectar from one flower to the next, at a certain point, they will move to another area once their search for food becomes too inefficient. This behavior, also observed among other animals, conforms to a prevalent model in biology called the "marginal value theorem." In like manner, groups of modern hunter-gatherers relocate their camps to maximize their foraging ef ... read more

Related Links
All About Human Beings and How We Got To Be Here

Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

ABOUT US
War-scarred Syrian children may be 'lost to trauma': aid group

Jihadist tunnels save Assyrian winged bulls of Mosul

U.S. Air Force retires first HC-130 search and rescue aircraft

115 migrants rescued, 25 missing: Libya navy

ABOUT US
Coffee-ring effect leads to crystallization control

3-D printing with plants

Researchers remotely control sequence in which 2-D sheets fold into 3-D structures

Physicists design a device inspired by sonic screwdriver

ABOUT US
Stanford biologists identify ancient stress response in corals

Chicago waterways still flowing after over 100 years

Sea of Galilee water level lowest in century: official

Massive Hong Kong shark fin seizure as ban flouted

ABOUT US
Is Arctic sea ice doomed to disappear?

NASA study improves forecasts of summer Arctic sea ice

UN reports Antarctica's highest temperatures on record

Air pollution may have masked mid-20th Century sea ice loss

ABOUT US
Stabilizing soils with sulfates to improve their constructional properties

Hand-picked specialty crops 'ripe' for precision agriculture techniques

Colombia's 'drug triangle' puts hope in chocolate

Hand-picked specialty crops 'ripe' for precision agriculture techniques

ABOUT US
Southern California fault systems capable of magnitude 7.3 earthquakes

Three killed as cyclone Enawo batters Madagascar

Cyclone kills four, heading towards Madagascar capital

Powerful aftershock hits quake-stricken Philippine city

ABOUT US
Nigerian military to probe rights abuse claims

PM hails Ben Guerdane battle as Tunisia 'turning point'

11 Malian soldiers killed in attack on border base

Senegal and Gambia announce new era of ties

ABOUT US
Aboriginal hair shows 50,000 years connection to country

Dartmouth study finds modern hunter-gathers relocate to maximize foraging efficiency

100,000-year-old human skulls from east Asia reveal complex mix of trends in time, space

Catalog of 208 human-caused minerals bolsters argument to declare 'Anthropocene Epoch'




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement