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SHAKE AND BLOW
Desperate rescue effort after Hurricane Maria toll hits 33
By Hector RETAMAL and Edgardo RODRIGUEZ
San Juan (AFP) Sept 22, 2017


Puerto Rico battled dangerous floods Friday after Hurricane Maria ravaged the island, as a dam burst, rescuers raced against time to reach trapped residents and the storm's death toll across the Caribbean climbed to 33.

Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello called Maria the most devastating storm in a century after it destroyed the US territory's electricity and telecommunications infrastructure.

In the latest chapter of the island's post-hurricane problems, a dam in the northwestern Isabela municipality failed and triggered flash floods, the National Weather Service office in San Juan said.

"This is an EXTREMELY DANGEROUS SITUATION," it said in a tweet. "Busses are currently evacuating people from the area as quickly as they can."

Rossello told CNN the island is lacking communications and the preliminary assessment at this point is 13 fatalities.

"Right now our efforts are to make sure we have everybody safe, that we can rescue people. Our efforts have already produced almost 700 rescues so we're clearly focused on that."

The National Hurricane Center said some areas in Puerto Rico could see 40 inches (more than a meter) of rain from Maria, and Rossello warned of dangerous mudslides brought on by the deluge.

"We have a lot of flooding, we have reports of complete devastation of vulnerable housing. Of course it's still raining over here."

- SOS text -

Maria has been blamed for at least 33 deaths, including 15 in Dominica, three in Haiti and two in Guadeloupe.

After lamenting that Puerto Rico had been "absolutely obliterated" by Maria, US President Donald Trump spoke with Governor Rossello Thursday night and promised to speed up relief efforts.

Although the southeast coast suffered the worst damage, no part of the island escaped the storm's wrath, including the capital San Juan where there was widespread flooding.

The city's mayor, Carmen Yulin Cruz, said the biggest need was getting emergency medication and supplies to vulnerable people who are stranded in their homes.

"Yesterday we were canvassing and we found elderly people that don't have blood pressure medicine, food," she said.

"I got an SOS from (an elderly home) and it was a text like from a horror movie. It said if anybody can hear us, please, we are stuck here and we can't get out and we have no power and we have very little water left. We got there just in time."

- Network crippled -

The torrential rain had turned some roads into muddy brown rivers, impassable to all but the largest of vehicles.

Toppled trees, street signs and power cables were strewn across roads that were also littered with debris.

Puerto Rico's electricity network has been crippled by the storm and engineers say it could take months for power to be fully restored.

The local electricity board has promised that their priority will be to restore power to hospitals, water treatment plants and pumping stations.

Brock Long, who heads the US federal government's emergency management agency FEMA, said that ships carrying millions of meals and bottled water were trying to dock as the island's ports are slowly reopened.

As of early Friday, Maria was a Category Three hurricane with winds of 125 miles per hour (205 kilometers per hour), churning in the sea some 35 miles east of Grand Turk Island in the Turks and Caicos.

Heavy rains and high winds began hitting the archipelago, a British territory, on Thursday afternoon.

The government opened new shelters after several buildings which had been used during Hurricane Irma earlier this month were damaged and authorities feared they might not hold up under another fierce storm.

In the Dominican Republic, the heavy rains triggered flooding as rivers overflowed their banks.

High winds downed trees and electrical pylons, and 140,000 people were left without power, the government said. Some 17,000 have been evacuated from their homes.

Maria previously tore through several Caribbean islands, claiming the highest toll on Dominica, which has a population of around 72,000 and has been largely cut off from the outside world.

- 'Very, very vulnerable' -

AFP aerial footage of Dominica showed debris from damaged buildings scattered across the island and many structures with their roofs ripped off. Trees were snapped in half or torn out of the ground.

Residents on Thursday were busy shoveling mud from their homes and businesses, while laundry was hung out to dry on the frames of half-destroyed homes and along downed utility cables.

Dominica's Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit appealed for desperately needed supplies and helicopters to ferry them to cut-off communities.

"These hurricanes are becoming stronger than ever and more powerful than ever... And we really need, all of us, to understand that these issues are of greater concern to small islands like ours.

"We are very very vulnerable," said Skerrit, who himself had to be rescued during the hurricane which blew off the roof off his home.

burs-dw/ec

SHAKE AND BLOW
Puerto Rico faces more floods after Maria 'obliteration'
San Juan (AFP) Sept 22, 2017
Puerto Rico grappled with the prospect of more flooding on top of an island-wide power outage following Hurricane Maria as the death toll from the powerful storm hit 21, most of them on the tiny Caribbean island of Dominica. President Donald Trump declared Puerto Rico a disaster zone and said Maria had "obliterated" the US territory of 3.4 million people. Governor Ricardo Rossello called ... read more

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