Earth Science News  





. Fathers Influence Child Language Development More Than Mothers

That's an A plus for Daddys and a B minus for Mummies.
by Staff Writers
Chapel Hill NC (SPX) Oct 31, 2006
In families with two working parents, fathers had greater impact than mothers on their children's language development between ages 2 and 3, according to a study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Frank Porter Graham (FPG) Child Development Institute and UNC's School of Education.

Researchers videotaped pairs of parents and their 2-year-old children in their homes during playtime. The children whose fathers used more diverse vocabularies had greater language development when they were tested one year later. However, the mothers' vocabulary did not significantly affect a child's language skills.

"Most previous studies on early language development focused on mothers," said Nadya Panscofar, a graduate research assistant and an author of the study. "These findings underscore that for two-parent, dual earner families, fathers should be included in all efforts to improve language development and school readiness."

Panscofar and Dr. Lynne Vernon-Feagans, the William C. Friday distinguished professor of Child and Family Studies in the School of Education and a faculty fellow at FPG, conducted the study in Pennsylvania as part of the Penn State Health and Development Project when both were affiliated with that university.

The study appears in the online version of the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology. It will appear in the November print issue of that publication.

A secondary finding of this study was that high-quality child care during the first three years of life was associated with higher scores at age 3 on a test of expressive language development. However, child care accounted for less variance than family language. Researchers also found that, consistent with previous research, the parents' level of education had a significant impact on children's language abilities.

Related Links
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
All About Human Beings and How We Got To Be Here

Early Bronze Age Mortuary Complex Discovered In Syria
Baltimore MD (SPX) Oct 25, 2006
An ancient, untouched Syrian tomb that wowed the archaeological world on its discovery by Johns Hopkins University researchers nearly six years ago has revealed another secret: It is not alone. The tomb, which was filled with human and animal remains, gold and silver treasures and unbroken artifacts dating back to the third millennium B.C., is actually one of at least eight located near each other in Umm el-Marra, archaeologist Glenn Schwartz said.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Hunger Driving North Korea Refugees, World Must Open Doors
  • LockMart To Create Incident Management Analysis System For The US Dept Of Interior
  • Intelligent Sensors Gear Up For Real-Time Flood Monitoring
  • FEMA Signing Statement Blasted

  • Stern's Grim Report
  • EU Members Face Showdown Over Emissions Trading Scheme
  • Insect Population Growth Likely Accelerated By Warmer Climate
  • Appalachian Mountains, Carbon Dioxide Caused Long-Ago Global Cooling

  • A Growing Intelligence Around Earth
  • Start of Operations Phase For ALOS And Data Provision To The Public
  • Afghanistan Opium Cultivation Monitored By International DMC Constellation
  • Deimos And Surrey Satellite Technology Contract For Spanish Imaging Mission

  • Australia To Build Southern Hemisphere's Largest Wind Farm
  • MIT's Pint-Sized Car Engine Promises High Efficiency, Low Cost
  • Important Advancement In Unraveling Mysteries Of Fusion Energy
  • Global Carbon Market Hits 22 Billion Dollars

  • Phoenix Rising: Scientists Resuscitate A 5 Million-Year-Old Retrovirus
  • Russia Tests Bird Flu Vaccine
  • Different Strategies Underlie The Ecology Of Microbial Invasions
  • Resistant Bug Battle Stepped Up

  • Elephants Recognize Themselves In The Mirror Too
  • Scientists' Cell Discovery Unearths Evolutionary Clues
  • The Power Behind Insect Flight: Researchers Reveal Key Kinetic Component
  • New Genetic Analysis Forces Re-Draw Of Insect Family Tree

  • Unique Imaging Uncovers The Invisible World Where Surfaces Meet
  • Yale Journal Identifies Products That Cause Greatest Environmental Damage
  • Yellow River Turns Red In Northwest China
  • Estuaries Of China's Greatest Rivers Declared "Dead Zones"

  • Fathers Influence Child Language Development More Than Mothers
  • Early Bronze Age Mortuary Complex Discovered In Syria
  • Lebanon Sees Revival Of Pre-Islamic Environmentalism
  • New Evidence Of Early Horse Domestication

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement