Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




ABOUT US
Feel-good hormones could cause UV addiction
by Staff Writers
Boston MA (SPX) Jun 20, 2014


File image.

Sun lovers eagerly flock to the beach every summer, despite widespread awareness of the risk of skin cancer. A study published June 19th by Cell Press in the journal Cell reveals that chronic exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes the release of feel-good hormones called endorphins, which act through the same pathway as heroin and related drugs, leading to physical dependence, tolerance, and addiction-like behavior in rodents.

The findings could explain why people have an instinctive desire to be in the sun, despite its known health risks.

"This information might serve as a valuable means of educating people to curb excessive sun exposure in order to limit skin cancer risk as well as accelerated skin aging that occurs with repeated sun exposure," says senior study author David Fisher of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. "Our findings suggest that the decision to protect our skin or the skin of our children may require more of a conscious effort rather than a passive preference."

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, and UV-seeking behavior is a major risk factor. Many UV seekers meet clinical criteria for a substance-related disorder, but the mechanisms underlying such an addiction have been unclear.

One potential clue is that UV exposure stimulates the production of endorphins, which relieve pain by activating opioid receptors through the same pathway activated by prescription painkillers, morphine, and heroin.

In the new study, Fisher and his team examined whether this pathway could underlie UV addiction. They exposed shaved mice to UV light for 6 weeks and found that endorphin levels in the bloodstream increased within 1 week. After the 6 week period ended, treatment with an opioid-blocking drug caused withdrawal symptoms, including shaking, tremors, and teeth chattering, in mice that had been exposed to UV light.

As a result, these mice avoided locations where they had been given the drug, suggesting that chronic UV exposure produces physical dependence and addiction-like behavior.

"It's surprising that we're genetically programmed to become addicted to something as dangerous as UV radiation, which is probably the most common carcinogen in the world," Fisher says.

"We suspect that the explanation involves UV's contribution to vitamin D synthesis in the skin. However, in the current time, there are much safer and more reliable sources of vitamin D that do not come with carcinogenic risk, so there is real health value in avoiding sunlight as a source of vitamin D."

.


Related Links
Massachusetts General Hospital
All About Human Beings and How We Got To Be Here






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ABOUT US
Chimpanzees spontaneously initiate and maintain cooperative behavior
Atlanta GA (SPX) Jun 13, 2014
Without any pre-training or restrictions in partner choice among chimpanzees, researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, found for the first time that chimpanzees housed in a socially complex, contained setting spontaneously cooperate with multiple partners of their choosing. This finding, which addresses long-standing doubt about the level of cooperation chimp ... read more


ABOUT US
Godzilla: Still relevant and raging after 60 years in Japan

Japan to help Bhutan brush up 'happiness' census

Japan satellites to monitor Fukushima, Chernobyl

Fukushima struggling to build ice wall to plug leak

ABOUT US
3D printer cleared for lift-off to ISS in August

SanDisk buys storage rival Fusion-io for $1.6 bn

3-D printing technology transforms dentistry, real estate and more

NASA's abandoned ISEE-3 craft to return to Earth's orbit

ABOUT US
US joins bid to create vast Pacific marine reserve; Kiribati bans fishing

China blamed as fishing case postponed in Philippines

Scientists take first dip into water's mysterious 'no-man's land'

Fighting hits water supply in east Ukraine city

ABOUT US
Antarctic species dwindle as icebergs batter shores year-round

New permafrost is forming around shrinking Arctic lakes

Researchers find major West Antarctic glacier melting from geothermal sources

Great Lakes finally free of ice

ABOUT US
India authority orders Coke plant closed

Findings may advance iron-rich, cadmium-free crops

Palmer amaranth threatens Midwest farm economy

Famine fear won't sway minds on GM crops

ABOUT US
Flood damage to Bosnia estimated at 2 billion euros

Changes in wind shear offers evidence for pole ward shift of hurricane intensity

Moderate quakes hit near Japan's Fukushima

Cristina strengthens to category four hurricane: NHC

ABOUT US
Chinese VP lauds better ties with African workers

Nearly 4,000 Eritreans flee each month: UN

Chinese VP in Zambia to boost ties with Africa's copper giant

Two years jail for Togolese ivory smuggler 'Le Patron'

ABOUT US
What amino acids in shells can tell us about Bronze Age people

Brain syncs blood flow to match activities

Feel-good hormones could cause UV addiction

Chimpanzees spontaneously initiate and maintain cooperative behavior




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.