Earth Science News  





.
SHAKE AND BLOW
Flood toll in China's northeast rises to 100: state media

Asia's deadliest floods of the past 20 years
Peshawar, Pakistan (AFP) Aug 1, 2010 - The floods that have killed more than 900 people in Pakistan are among the deadliest ever seen in Asia over the past 20 years. Others include:

June-September 1991: More than 3,000 dead in central and eastern China

September 1992: More than 3,000 dead and missing in northern and central Pakistan following monsoon rains

July 1993: More than 2,000 are killed in Nepal, and around 1,000 in Bangladesh and India, after monsoon rains

June-September 1993: More than 3,300 dead during the rainy season in China

June-July 1994: More than 2,000 dead in China, mainly in the south

July-August 1996: Some 3,000 dead in nine provinces in central China

March 1998: More than 1,500 dead in southwestern Pakistan after floods struck around 100 villages

May-August 1998: More than 4,000 dead in southern and central China, with most of the victims in the Yangtze River valley, in the worst floods since 1954 when more than 30,000 died

June-September 1998: Some 2,000 dead in northern and eastern India

July-September 1998: Around 2,000 dead and more than 30 million left homeless by floods that struck two-thirds of Bangladesh

June-September 2007: Monsoon rains leave more than 1,000 dead and displace 2.5 million others in Bangladesh

August 2007: At least 600 dead or missing in North Korea during heavy rains

August 8, 2009: Floods triggered by a typhoon leave 614 dead and 75 missing in Taiwan

The biggest natural disaster to strike Asia in recent years remains the December 2004 tsunami that struck about a dozen countries and killed more than 226,000 people.

Flash floods kill at least 65 in Afghanistan: official
Kabul (AFP) July 31, 2010 - Flash floods in Afghanistan have killed at least 65 people and affected more than 1,000 families, the national disaster authority chief told AFP Saturday. Rescue teams in the northeast of the country are still struggling to reach areas cut off by flooded roads and the threat of insurgent attacks, said Abdul Matin Edrok, head of the Afghanistan National Disaster Management Authority. "Initial information sent by our provincal offices shows that nearly 70 people have been killed and tens injured. We estimate more than 1,000 families have been affected but these figures may rise," he said. Most of those affected were in northeast Kapisa province, where 31 people died, he said. Others were killed in the eastern provinces of Nangarhar, Laghman, Kunar and Logar, central Ghazni province and northern Parwan.

Edrok said food and medical aid was being distributed using some Afghan and NATO coalition helicopters, and that the rains causing the floods had now ended. In neighbouring Pakistan, at least 408 people have been killed and 600,000 people affected by the worst floods in living memory, as monsoon rains triggered flash floods and landslides. Military operations are under way to help those living across the Afghan border in the impoverished remote mountain belt.

by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) Aug 1, 2010
Floods sweeping through northeastern China have left more than 100 people dead or missing after 10 days of downpours, state media said Sunday,

Waters have cut off roads, left villages inaccessible and knocked out communications and water supplies in the hardest-hit areas, the official Xinhua news agency reported.

About 37,000 houses have been swept away while floodwaters damaged 125,000 others, the report said. About 592,000 residents have been evacuated from waterlogged areas.

"The flood is unprecedented. Its devastation is appalling," Sun Jingyuan, a top official in Antu County in Jilin's Korean Autonomous Prefecture of Yanbian was quoted as saying.

Seventy houses in a village in Antu were wiped out, while 570 families were forced to leave their homes in a mountain valley after the area was submerged beneath 20 metres (66 feet) of water, the report said.

Soldiers reached the isolated town of Liangjiang late Saturday to help 10,000 residents evacuate, Sun said.

Further downstream, soldiers, police and firemen continued to retrieve thousands of barrels full of explosive chemicals that were washed away by flood waters into the Songhua River.

Water supplies to the nearby city of Jilin were temporarily cut after the incident on Wednesday, leaving 4.3 million people dependent on bottled water.

A total of 7,000 barrels were washed into the river, with around half of them containing volatile chemicals, Xinhua said.

Around 6,400 barrels had been recovered by Sunday evening, Xinhua said, but it was not clear how many of them contained the toxic substances.

Boats were chained together across the 500-metre (1,650-foot) -wide waterway to block the barrels from going further downstream, but officials in neighboring Heilongjiang confirmed the chemicals had affected their water.

The barrels were being rapidly swept down the river, after the Fengman Dam floodgates opened Friday afternoon, and experts feared the barrels could explode if they hit a dam further downstream.

Until now, torrential rains have mostly hit China's south, swelling the Yangtze River -- the nation's longest waterway -- and some of its tributaries to dangerous levels.

The worst flooding in a decade has left more than 1,000 dead and hundreds missing since the beginning of the year and caused more than 28 billion dollars of damage, according to the latest official figures, and authorities have warned of more to come.

earlier related report
Floods kill 37 in China's northeast: state media
Beijing (AFP) July 31, 2010 - The death toll from floods sweeping through northeastern China has risen to 37, state media said Saturday, as authorities raced to intercept 12 heavy vessels hurtling down a major waterway.

Torrential rains in Jilin province have left a further 35 people missing as more than 364,000 people were evacuated from waterlogged areas, the official Xinhua news agency reported.

The weather bureau has predicted more heavy rain for the central and eastern parts of the hard-hit province, with experts warning of further flooding and landslides.

Water, electricity and telecommunication services were cut in parts of the province, while train services in the town of Kouqian were suspended after the railway station was surrounded by flood waters, previous reports said.

More than 95,000 buildings have been damaged in the floods, with 25,000 destroyed, Xinhua said.

Floodwater up to three metres (10 feet) deep in some places submerged factories and houses, reports said earlier this week, before the waters receded to about one metre.

Elsewhere in Jilin, hundreds of soldiers and many boats were mobilised to stop 12 heavy vessels being swept down the Songhua River towards a major dam, Xinhua said.

The vessels, weighing up to 12 tonnes each, broke their moorings early Saturday and were heading towards the Fengman dam.

Further downstream, hundreds of workers continued to retrieve 3,000 barrels full of explosive chemicals that were washed by flood waters into the Songhua River.

Water supplies to the nearby city of Jilin were temporarily cut after the incident on Wednesday, leaving 4.3 million people dependent on bottled water.

A total of 7,000 barrels were washed into the river, with 2,500 containing the chemical trimethyl chloro silicane -- a highly explosive, colorless liquid -- while 500 contained the compound hexamethyl disilazane, Xinhua said.

About 4,260 barrels had been recovered by Saturday afternoon, the report said, but it was not clear how many of them contained the toxic chemicals.

The barrels are being swept down the river at a faster pace than before, after the Fengman Dam floodgates were opened Friday afternoon, and experts are worried the barrels could explode if they hit a dam further downstream.

Jilin is the latest province to have been hit by deadly floods that have killed more than 300 people since July 14 and left another 300 missing, according to the latest official figures.

Until now, torrential rains have mostly hit China's south, swelling the Yangtze River -- the nation's longest waterway -- and some of its tributaries to dangerous levels.

In northeastern Liaoning province, 55 South Korean tourists stranded on a bus for four hours by floods in Muqi town have been rescued, Xinhua said.

In the far-western Xinjiang region, rescuers were trying to reach 700 residents, construction workers and tourists trapped by floods.

Floodwaters have damaged three bridges and a dozen buildings in the central part of the region, with more than 13,000 people from the area preparing to reinforce dykes to contain floods.

The worst flooding in a decade has left 991 dead and 558 missing since the beginning of the year and caused more than 28 billion dollars in damage, latest official figures show, and authorities have warned of more to come.




Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
SHAKE AND BLOW
Pakistan flood toll tops 1,100 as cholera emerges
Peshawar, Pakistan (AFP) Aug 1, 2010
The death toll from Pakistan's worst floods in living memory topped 1,100 on Sunday as outbreaks of water-borne disease emerged and penniless survivors sought refuge from the raging torrents. More than 1.5 million people have been affected by monsoon rains, flash floods and landslides in the northwest province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and at least another 47 have died in Pakistani-administered ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


SHAKE AND BLOW
Japanese rescue-bot can sniff out disaster survivors

Flood-triggered landslide in China leaves 21 missing

Haiti's homeless on the move again as hurricanes loom

Wildfire Prevention Pays Big Dividends In Florida

SHAKE AND BLOW
Africa, Mideast behind cellphone bonanza

Smartphones tempting new targets for hackers

Amazon looking to go 'mass market' with Kindle price cut

Howcast, or 'How to Build a New Media Company'

SHAKE AND BLOW
Artificially Controlling Water Condensation Leads To 'Room-Temperature Ice'

Nanotechnology For Water Purification

Decline Of Marine Phytoplankton Over The Past Century

Scientists Uncover Global Distribution Of Marine Biodiversity

SHAKE AND BLOW
Best Hope For Saving Arctic Sea Ice Is Cutting Soot Emissions

Cutting Into Arctic Sea Ice

Whether Glaciers Float May Affect Sea-Level Rise

In Arctic, scientists see dire effect of ocean acidification

SHAKE AND BLOW
Mines and wines in Australia climate battle

Modified cotton helps Indian women

Goa's frog poachers feed taste for 'jumping chicken'

Seville to become as hot as Tucson by end of century: study

SHAKE AND BLOW
Birth Of A Hurricane

Flood toll in China's northeast rises to 100: state media

Pakistan flood toll tops 1,100 as cholera emerges

Floods kill 29 in China's northeast

SHAKE AND BLOW
GBissau records veterans in demobilisation drive

Uganda's rebels seen behind border killing

Congo boat disaster leaves 140 dead

Mubarak passes on African Union summit

SHAKE AND BLOW
Massive Gains For Women's Employment In India

Divers Plumb The Mysteries Of Sacred Maya Pools

Scientists use noses to help disabled write, surf, move

New Hypothesis For Human Evolution And Human Nature


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement