Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
Focusing on water for Central Everglades essential to reversing whole ecosystem's continuing decline
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 26, 2012


File image.

Twelve years into a multibillion-dollar state and federal effort to save the Florida Everglades, little progress has been made in restoring the core of the ecosystem, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Research Council.

Expedited restoration projects that improve the quality and amount of water in this area are necessary to reverse ongoing declines. A new federal pilot project offers an innovative approach to this challenge, although additional analysis is needed to maximize restoration benefits within existing legal constraints.

The report is the fourth biennial evaluation of progress made by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, a project launched in 2000 that aims to reverse the ecosystem's decline while continuing to meet demands for water supply and flood control. The $13.5 billion effort comprises numerous projects to be completed over the next several decades.

The committee that wrote the report found that restoration remains primarily focused on the periphery of the central Everglades. Consequently, restoration efforts within the water conservation areas and Everglades National Park lag behind other portions. Progress has been made to improve the system's water quality, such as reducing phosphorus and finalizing negotiations for additional water quality projects.

Nevertheless, there has been minimal success in increasing the amount and flow of water needed to restore the remnant system. Key components that depend on the amount of water in the system, such as the ridge and slough and tree islands, continue to degrade.

"Unless near-term progress is made to improve water quantity and restore water flow, ecosystem losses will continue, many of which would require decades to centuries to recover," said William Boggess, chair of the committee and professor and executive associate dean of the college of agricultural sciences at Oregon State University, Corvallis.

"However, bringing in more water, or even redistributing existing water flows before water quality is improved, risks introducing levels of contaminants that would have substantial effects on the ecosystem and possibly exceed legal limits. Analyzing the connections between water quality and quantity is one of the remaining challenges of the program, and will be a key component for moving forward."

The committee found that the Central Everglades Planning Project (CEPP) - one of five U.S. Army Corps of Engineers pilot projects nationwide that will test a new accelerated project planning process - is an important and promising new initiative.

Its goal is to deliver an approved project implementation report on central Everglades restoration to Congress within two years instead of the typical six-year process. At the completion of the committee's report, CEPP remained at an early stage, and no specific project plans were available for the committee to review.

Over the past few years, scientific understanding has advanced and provides a solid foundation for decision making in the program, the committee said. Investment in cutting-edge research, consolidated and timely synthesis, and effective monitoring are critical to supporting sound choices.

Additional use of integrated ecosystem modeling and decision support tools could facilitate restoration progress by clarifying potential restoration conflicts, identifying interim strategies for limiting further degradation of critical ecosystem components, and enhancing the capacity to address trade-offs in a more timely and integrated way.

.


Related Links
National Academy of Sciences
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Restoring Streams Helps Winter Songbirds
Los Angeles CA (SPX) Jun 26, 2012
A new study by PRBO Conservation Science (PRBO) and the National Aviary finds that restoring floodplain forests in the Central Valley of California helps songbirds survive through the winter, a finding previously substantiated only for summer nesting birds. The floodplain of California's Central Valley is rich with streamside forests of willows, cottonwoods, oaks, and sycamores. Each summe ... read more


WATER WORLD
Eviction pits Haiti police against protestors

Population displacement during disasters predicted using mobile data

Japan sorry for not using US radiation map

Nearly 15 million people displaced by disasters in 2011

WATER WORLD
India readies upgrade of 'world's cheapest' tablet

Google to talk tablets, TV, social and more

NuSTAR Mission Status Report: Observatory Unfurls its Unique Mast

Toxic legacy in Malaysia rare-earths village

WATER WORLD
Restoring Streams Helps Winter Songbirds

Rising sea level puts US Atlantic coast at risk: report

China submersible breaks 7,000-metre mark

Focusing on water for Central Everglades essential to reversing whole ecosystem's continuing decline

WATER WORLD
Emperor penguins threatened by Antarctic sea ice loss

Melting Sea Ice Threatens Emperor Penguins

Arctic climate more vulnerable than thought, maybe linked to Antarctic ice-sheet behavior

Climate drilling in the Arctic Circle

WATER WORLD
Gene discovery may mean more, better rice

Food security and climate change

New evidence in fructose debate: Could it be healthy for us?

China, Argentina sign agricultural accords

WATER WORLD
China quake kills at least four, injures 100

US Gulf Coast braces for Tropical Storm Debby

Dalai Lama visits scene of Italy quakes

Afghanistan flash floods kill more than 30

WATER WORLD
New revolt escalates endless DRC war

Hotel inside S.Africa's Kruger Park irks conservationists

Once-violent Mogadishu now growing

More DR Congo soldiers desert ranks: mutineers

WATER WORLD
'Brain-hacking' technology sought

Out of the mouths of primates, facial mechanics of human speech may have evolved

Google sets out to save dying languages

Adaptable decision making in the brain




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement