Earth Science News  





.
WATER WORLD
Global Fisheries Research Finds Promise And Peril

While industry contributes $240B annually, overfishing takes toll on people and revenue
by Staff Writers
Vancouver, Canada (SPX) Sep 16, 2010
Global fisheries, a vital source of food and revenue throughout the world, contribute between US$225-$240 billion per year to the worldwide economy, according to four newly released studies. Researchers also concluded that healthier fisheries could have prevented malnourishment in nearly 20 million people in poorer countries.

This research, conducted by the University of British Columbia's Fisheries Centre, with support from the Pew Environment Group, quantifies the social and economic value of fish around the world and also calculates the loss of both revenue and dependable protein sources from years of overfishing.

"We know fish play an important ecological role in the marine environment, but these studies assess their 'out-of-the-water' value to people across the globe," says lead economist Associate Professor Rashid Sumaila at the University of British Columbia's Fisheries Centre.

"Whether you are looking at fish as a financial resource or a source of protein, our research shows that the benefits of healthy, robust fisheries have enormous value far beyond the fishing dock."

Dr. Sumaila and his team of researchers also found that:
+ Overfishing reduces revenue. Annually, estimated global catch losses from overfishing totaled up to seven to 36 per cent of the actual tonnage landed in a year, resulting in a landed value loss of between US$6.4-36 billion each year.

+ Fishing has a multiplier effect. The fishing industry's economic impact on related businesses, such as boat building, international transport and bait suppliers, is roughly three times larger than the value of fish at first sale.

+ Fisheries generate incomes. Wild fisheries generate more than US$63 billion in annual household incomes around the world.

+ Non-industrial uses of the oceans are a net positive for economies and jobs. Recreational use of ocean ecosystems by sport divers, whale watchers and recreational fishermen contributes US$47 billion each year to national economies worldwide and generates nearly 1.1 million jobs.

One of the four papers focused on global fisheries subsidies, or financial incentives that countries offer to their fishing industries, which may contribute to depleted fish stocks. Large developed countries are spending twice the amount of tax-payer money on global fisheries subsidies that encourage overfishing than they are on subsidies that protect oceans.

"Many economies are paying doubly for continued overfishing of our oceans," says Sumaila. "First, tax-payer money is directly contributing to the decline of worldwide fisheries, and second, fishermen and undernourished people are hurting from a steadily declining resource. From a socioeconomic standpoint, subsidies that promote overfishing are doing far more harm than good."




Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
University of British Columbia
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
WATER WORLD
Human Impacts On The Deep Seafloor
Washington DC (SPX) Sep 16, 2010
Scientists have for the first time estimated the physical footprint of human activities on the deep seafloor of the North East Atlantic. The findings published in the journal PLoS ONE reveal that the area disturbed by bottom trawling commercial fishing fleets exceeds the combined physical footprint of other major human activities considered. The deep seafloor covers approximately 60% of Ea ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


WATER WORLD
EU agrees trade-linked aid package for Pakistan

Tiny MAVs May Someday Explore And Detect Environmental Hazards

New Zealand lifts emergency in quake-hit Christchurch

UN humanitarian chief calls for new thinking on mega-crises

WATER WORLD
Asia defies global newspaper meltdown

E-readers yet to win mass market in China

Indian handset makers emerge as hyper-competitive force

Home Electrical Wiring Acts As Antenna To Receive Low-Power Sensor Data

WATER WORLD
Global Fisheries Research Finds Promise And Peril

Drought shrinks Amazon River to lowest level in 47 years

Marine Scientists Call For European Marine Observatory Network

Human Impacts On The Deep Seafloor

WATER WORLD
Russia, Canada trade rival Arctic claims

Glaciers Help High-Latitude Mountains Grow Taller

Arctic sea ice shrinks to third lowest area on record

Arctic ice melting quickly, report says

WATER WORLD
Global Project Underway To Preserve Yam Biodiversity

Indian Farmers Adopt Flood-Tolerant Rice At Unprecedented Rates

China says will pay close attention to BHP bid for Potash

Unusual Feed Supplement Could Ease Greenhouse Gassy Cows

WATER WORLD
Hurricane Karl menaces Mexico, Igor eyes Bermuda

Next Iceland eruption will likely cause less havoc: experts

Purdue Students Face Storm To Study Hurricane Development

Rare duo of powerful hurricanes roils Atlantic

WATER WORLD
Kenya may be lifeline for new Sudan state

Termites Foretell Climate Change In Africa's Savannas

Nigeria leader replaces military, security heads: presidency

Congo dispute could hurt Africa investment

WATER WORLD
Roma issue could overshadow EU summit

Scientists Glimpse Dance Of Skeletons Inside Neurons

European Parliament blasts Roma expulsions

New Climate Change Mitigation Schemes Could Benefit Elites More Than Poor


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement