. Earth Science News .

Grim search after 37 die in Japan typhoon
by Staff Writers
Tokyo (AFP) Sept 5, 2011

A railway bridge is collapsed in the Nachi river, caused by flooding in the town of Nachikatsuura in Wakayama prefecture, western Japan on September 5, 2011. Rescue teams on September 5 resumed a grim search for the missing after a deadly typhoon pummelled western Japan leaving at least 25 people dead and more than 50 unaccounted for. Photo courtesy AFP.

Rescue teams carried out a painstaking search Monday for the missing after a typhoon pounded western Japan leaving at least 37 people dead and more than 50 unaccounted for, local authorities said.

Torrential rain brought by powerful Typhoon Talas, which made landfall Saturday and was one of the deadliest in years, caused rivers to swell and triggered floods and landslides that swept away buildings, homes and roads.

Police and firefighters resumed a search for the missing early Monday, warning that the number of victims was set to rise as the continued threat of landslides and damaged access routes hampered relief efforts.

In the deadliest typhoon since an October 2004 storm killed nearly 100 people, floods triggered by Typhoon Talas gave rise to scenes eerily reminiscent of the aftermath of the March 11 tsunami that hit northeast Japan.

In Nachikatsuura town, a railway bridge was swept into a river, while TV footage showed splintered trees, crushed houses and cars tossed onto walls and buildings by the raging floodwaters that inundated entire neighbourhoods.

By Sunday, Talas had been downgraded to a tropical storm after it moved over Japan and into the Sea of Japan (East Sea), the Meteorological Agency said, but risks of further landslides posed a threat to rescue and recovery efforts.

The storm came after new Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda was sworn in on Friday, replacing Naoto Kan, who was heavily criticised for the government's response in the aftermath of the March 11 disasters.

"We will do our best in saving lives and finding the missing," Noda told reporters Monday.

The Talas weather system dumped 1.8 metres (six feet) of rain on a village in Nara prefecture for five days through Sunday, more than Tokyo's annual average rainfall, said the Yomiuri daily.

The Kyodo News agency and Jiji Press late Monday said the death toll had risen to 37.

"We are struggling to get a hold on the current situation... electricity is out and destroyed roads are preventing our vehicles from going into affected areas," said an official at the fire department in Tanabe, Wakayama prefecture.

"We are conducting operations everywhere in the city. With phone lines down, however, we have no means of communication" with those stranded in areas hit by landslides or flooding, the official said.

The daughter of Nachikatsuura town mayor Shinichi Teramoto was killed as the official ran disaster relief operations Sunday and his wife was also missing. His house was destroyed by a torrent of water.

"I saw the body of my daughter. The best I could do was to be by her side for half an hour," NHK footage showed the mayor saying in his office.

"While I'm here, I don't want to show my sorrow even though I have this in my mind," he said.

Television footage showed massive landslides crushing wooden houses in mountain communities, with muddy water submerging streets and washing away wooden debris and cars.

A tally by Kyodo said at least 3,600 people were left stranded by landslides and collapsed bridges.

In hard-hit Wakayama and Nara prefectures, officials told AFP that more than 1,300 people were staying at evacuation centres with around 7,000 households being asked to flee.

Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest


Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries

. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Grim search after 25 die in Japan typhoon
Tokyo (AFP) Sept 5, 2011
Rescue teams on Monday resumed a grim search for the missing after a deadly typhoon pummelled western Japan leaving at least 25 people dead and more than 50 unaccounted for. Torrential rain brought by powerful Typhoon Talas, which made landfall in western Japan on Saturday, caused rivers to swell and triggered floods and landslides that swept away buildings, homes and roads. Police and f ... read more

Grim search after 31 die in Japan typhoon

Haiti political knot complicates governance: outgoing PM

Reconstruction from quake top priority: Japan PM Noda

Obama tours flooded, storm-hit New Jersey

Ion armageddon: Measuring the impact energy of highly charged ions

A "nano," environmentally friendly, and low toxicity flame retardant protects fabric

Google doodles a playful mix of art and technology

Penn Physicists Develop New Insight Into How Disordered Solids Deform

Greece to airlift water to Tripoli: foreign ministry

Iran accuses protesters of politicising dying lake: report

UN, EU leaders to hear Pacific climate concerns

UN dismisses fears of Tripoli water crisis

Iceland receives Chinese request for land purchase: ministry

China tycoon makes Iceland environment pledge

Woolly rhino fossil hints at origins of Ice Age giants

Chinese tycoon defends Iceland project

Using Ground Covers in Organic Production

Unfounded pesticide concerns adversely affect the health of low-income populations

Nitrogen pollution's little-known environmental and human health threats

How an 'evolutionary playground' brings plant genes together

Depression Lee weakens over US South

US readies flood aid to N. Korea

Grim search after 37 die in Japan typhoon

Depression Lee brings flash floods to Louisiana

One killed in Senegal rebel attack

Nigerian soldiers kill two in reprisal attack on town

Uruguay shanty towns get partial reprieve

Ugandan villagers reel from mudslide tragedy

Two Brain Halves Just One Perception

40-year follow-up on marshmallow test points to biological basis for delayed gratification

Humans shaped stone axes 1.8 million years ago

Climate change threatens mental health too: study

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2011 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement