Earth Science News  





. Half-Animal, Half-Plant Microbe Found

The microbe is originally green and is made up of algae. When it divides into two cells, one takes over the algae from its parent and remains green and the other turns colorless

Tsukuba, Japan (UPI) Oct 17, 2005
Japanese scientists have found a mysterious marine microbe, half of which cells eat algae like animals while the rest perform photosynthesis like plants.

Professor Isao Inoue, a member of the University of Tsukuba research team, told the Mainichi Daily News he believes the microbe demonstrates part of the process of single-cell marine microbes evolving into plants.

The research team discovered the single-cell microbe, a kind of flagellate, on a beach in Wakayama Prefecture, and called it "hatena" or "mystery."

The microbe is originally green and is made up of algae. When it divides into two cells, one takes over the algae from its parent and remains green and the other turns colorless, Mainichi reported.

The animal-type colorless cell develops an organ like a mouth and uses it to eat algae, while the plant-type green one uses algae it has in its body to perform photosynthesis and produce energy, according to the team.

The researchers believe that as the marine microbes evolve into plants, only the chloroplasts in algae they had taken in their cells developed, while the other organs degenerated.

Related Links
SpaceDaily
Search SpaceDaily
Subscribe To SpaceDaily Express

Seaweed Yields New Compounds With Pharmaceutical Potential
Atlanta GA (SPX) Oct 13, 2005
Researchers have discovered 10 new molecular structures with pharmaceutical potential in a species of red seaweed that lives in the shallow coral reef along the coastline of Fiji in the south Pacific Ocean.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Sodden Kashmiri Quake Survivors Beg For Tents
  • New Orleans Replaces Fired Workers With Computers
  • US-Central America Security Deal Fails
  • Many More Doctors Needed To Help SAsia Quake Victims: UN

  • Warmer Seas, Wetter Air Make Harder Rains as Greenhouse Gases Build
  • Link Between Tropical Warming And Greenhouse Gases Stronger Than Ever
  • Prehistoric Global Warming May Have Contributed To Fossil Preservation
  • The Tropics Play A More Active Role Than Was Thought In Controlling The Earth's Climate

  • The Next Generation Blue Marble
  • Interview With Volker Liebig On The Loss Of Cryosat
  • Wetlands Satellite Mapping Scheme Yielding First Results
  • DigitalGlobe Unveils Plans For WorldView I And WorldView II Imaging Systems

  • Oil Prices Jump On Fresh US Hurricane Threat
  • China Could Become World Leader In Wind Power: Greenpeace
  • NATO Means Business To Protect Pipelines
  • Spaceward Foundation And NASA Announce Beam Power And Tether Competitions

  • Flu Virus Reported To Resist Drug Envisioned For Pandemic
  • Health Wrap: Of Polio And Pandemics
  • Senator Urges Generic Tamiflu
  • WHO Official Says World Can Beat Bird Flu

  • Half-Animal, Half-Plant Microbe Found
  • Seaweed Yields New Compounds With Pharmaceutical Potential
  • Malaysian Palm Oil Industry Denies Fuelling Orang-Utan Extinction
  • NASA Discovers Life's Building Blocks Are Common In Space

  • Acid Rain And Forest Mass: Another Perspective
  • Mystery Fumes Envelope Lagos
  • Katrina Floodwaters Not As Toxic To Humans As Previously Thought, Study Says
  • UCSD Leads Team To Build Geographic Information System To Assess Toxic Hazards From Katrina

  • Scientists Uncover Why Picture Perception Works
  • The Roots Of Civilization Trace Back To ... Roots
  • The Mechanics Of Foot Travel
  • Compound May Prevent Neuron-Degeneration

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement