Earth Science News  





.
ABOUT US
Human Rules May Determine Environmental Tipping Points

File image courtesy AFP.
by Staff Writers
South Bend IN (SPX) Apr 19, 2011
A new paper appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) suggests that people, governments, and institutions that shape the way people interact may be just as important for determining environmental conditions as the environmental processes themselves.

"Tipping points," qualitative changes in an ecosystem that often result in reduced ecosystem health and are difficult and costly to reverse increasingly concern environmental scientists.

The prevailing assumption among scientists has been that tipping points are fixed values. However, a unique research collaboration involving a team of biologists and economists that included University of Notre Dame ecologist David Lodge, Michigan State University economist Richard Horan, Arizona State University economist Eli Fenichel and Bethel College biologist Kevin Drury, indicates that these tipping points are not fixed in human-impacted ecological systems and depend, instead, on human responses to a changing environment.

The authors point out many instances of tipping points that resulted in catastrophic changes in ecosystems, such as climate change, collapsed freshwater and marine fisheries and changes wrought by invasive species.

For example, the invasive species sea lamprey changed the Great Lakes from an environment productive of lake trout and whitefish to a collapsed fishery. If not for the $17 million spent annually by the United States and Canada to control them, sea lamprey would continue to devastate Great Lakes fisheries.

In the research described in the PNAS paper, the researchers studied invasive rusty crayfish, which have transformed many Michigan and Wisconsin lakes from luxuriant underwater forests inhabited by many smaller animals that supported sport fish to clear-cut forests with diminished production of sport fish. This outcome occurred despite the fact that there are many fish like smallmouth bass that readily consume crayfish.

"Our work explored whether a shift from one lake condition with excellent habitat to another lake condition with barren lake bottom is the inevitable result of invasion by crayfish or whether it is just one possible outcome," Lodge said.

"In other words, we asked whether we humans need to passively accept undesirable outcomes or whether, instead, the institutions and rules by which we make decisions can change the landscape of possibilities."

The institutional rules shape the relationship among managers, users, and ecological systems. If the system is mapped using only ecological characteristics, then managers may not account for human responses to change, such as changing decisions about whether or how much to fish as fishing quality changes.

The research results showed that tipping points in human-impacted ecosystems are affected by regulatory choices that influence human behavior.

"This gives us reason for optimism: if we give regulators sufficient flexibility it may be possible and cost-effective to manage ecological systems so that only desirable ecological outcomes arise and tipping points are eliminated," Horan said.

"Our results also create concern: if natural resource managers' policy choices are overly restricted, then it might be too difficult or costly to avoid tipping points," Fenichel added.

In particular, the researchers stress that their results highlight the importance of giving strong institutional support to regulatory agencies that aim to enhance societal wellbeing.

"Without strong institutional support, tipping points might disappear but not in a good way," Horan said.

"Suppose lake managers invest in crayfish removal but do not properly alter the behavior of anglers, who overharvest fish. In such a scenario, crayfish removal may be ineffective at restoring the lake system if anglers continue to pull the ecosystem toward an undesirable state. Investing in crayfish removal without also addressing angler behaviors is therefore a waste of money. Why would we invest to protect the system from crayfish if we are unable or unwilling to protect the system from humans?"




Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
University of Notre Dame
All About Human Beings and How We Got To Be Here



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
ABOUT US
Are Your Values Right Or Left? The Answer Is More Literal Than You Think
Washington DC (SPX) Apr 15, 2011
Up equals good, happy, optimistic; down the opposite. Right is honest and trustworthy. Left, not so much. That's what language and culture tell us. "We use mental metaphors to structure our thinking about abstract things," says psychologist Daniel Casasanto, "One of those metaphors is space." But we don't all think right is right, Casasanto has found. Rather, "people associate goodness wit ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


ABOUT US
Taiwan fears impact of Japan-style disaster

Latvia's president marked by role at Chernobyl

Leaders pledge aid to complete Chernobyl shelter

Nuclear workers patrol Chernobyl's ruined reactor

ABOUT US
Don't stigmatise nuclear evacuees, says Japan govt

Robot readings in Japan nuke plant 'harsh'

Technology addiction takes toll in Asia

Researchers Discover The Cause Of Irradiation-Induced Instability In Materials Surfaces

ABOUT US
Oxygenation At A Depth Of 120 Meters Can Save The Baltic Sea

How Do You Manage U.S. Oceans? Look At Local Successes

New count made of world's barrier islands

Mekong nations at odds on controversial Laos dam

ABOUT US
Arctic coastline eroding with warming

Arctic Coasts On The Retreat

West Antarctic Warming Triggered By Warmer Sea Surface In Tropical Pacific

Arctic Sea Ice Flights Near Completion

ABOUT US
Nationwide Study Finds US Meat And Poultry Is Widely Contaminated

Activists save Chinese dogs from cooking pot

Japan asks Brazil to ease food import rules

New Citrus Variety Released By Uc Riverside Is Very Sweet, Juicy And Low-Seeded

ABOUT US
Floods force hundreds to evacuate in central Canada

Liquefaction major culprit in Japan quake

6.6-magnitude quake hits off New Zealand: USGS

Increasing activity at Philippine volcano

ABOUT US
Work on Sudan split continues

Chinese aid good for Africa: ministers

Military helicopter crashes in Darfur, five dead: army

Senegal opens Chinese-built theatre

ABOUT US
Missing The Gorilla

Human Rules May Determine Environmental Tipping Points

World's oldest man turns 114 in Japan

Scripps Research Scientists Identify Mechanism Of Long-Term Memory


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement