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Indonesian man escapes Aceh and Japan tsunamis

Japan disaster dead, missing at 14,650: police
Tokyo (AFP) March 17, 2011 - The official number of dead and missing after a devastating earthquake and tsunami that flattened Japan's northeast coast has hit 14,650, police said Thursday, a rise of nearly 1,000 in just a few hours. The number of confirmed dead from Friday's twin disasters rose to 5,321, while the official number of missing increased to 9,329, the national police agency said in its latest update. A total of 2,383 people were injured in the disaster.

But reports have indicated that the final toll could be much higher. The mayor of the coastal town of Ishinomaki in Miyagi prefecture said late Wednesday that the number of missing there was likely to hit 10,000, Kyodo News reported. On Saturday, public broadcaster NHK reported that around 10,000 people were unaccounted for in the port town of Minamisanriku in the same prefecture. Amid a mass rescue effort there were grim updates indicating severe loss of life along the battered east coast of Honshu island, where the monster waves destroyed or damaged more than 55,380 homes and other buildings.
by Staff Writers
Jakarta (AFP) March 17, 2011
An Indonesian man said Thursday that he had escaped both the 2004 tsunami in Aceh and last week's wave in Japan.

Doctoral student Zahrul Fuadi, 39, who is from the Indonesian province, was at a seminar at a university campus in Sendai when a 9.0-magnitude earthquake struck, triggering a tsunami that devastated Japan's northeastern coast.

Seven years ago, the engineer had to flee from the wall of water that killed 168,000 people in his own country.

"I have survived two monumental disasters. I'm very grateful, not many people have experienced two big disasters and survived," Fuadi told AFP.

His house in Simpang Mesra village, Banda Aceh, was destroyed in the 2004 disaster, which followed a 9.3-magnitude quake.

Then, he said, "we were at my house when the quake happened. Me, my wife and my two children escaped from the tsunami by riding a motorcycle. We went very far from my house because we were so afraid.

"Actually I'm more scared of tsunamis than earthquakes. I was running away from the Aceh tsunami back then and thinking that was the end of the world," he said.

Fuadi is a faculty member at Syah Kuala University in Banda Aceh, and his family moved to Sendai after he received a scholarship to complete his doctorate at Tohoku University in the town.

He has been living in Japan for the past six years, but he and his family were spared by last week's tsunami because the campus is 20 kilometres (12.4 miles) from the coast.

Fuadi returned to Indonesia on Tuesday and has flown back to Aceh.

"I plan to return to Sendai as I have to finish some work. But now it's the nuclear radiation that I'm afraid of," he said.

Indonesia was the nation hardest hit in the 2004 tsunami, with more than three-quarters of the 220,000 victims around the Indian Ocean.

earlier related report
Mounting Japan crisis sparks warnings to leave Tokyo
Tokyo (AFP) March 17, 2011 - Alarm over Japan's nuclear crisis grew on Thursday as army helicopters water-bombed an overheating power plant and foreign governments urged citizens to leave Tokyo.

Airline tickets were scarce and firms hired private jets to evacuate staff as countries from the United States to Europe and Australia warned their citizens to get out of Tokyo.

The US chartered aircraft to take Americans out of the country, China moved thousands of its citizens to Tokyo for evacuation, and France assigned two government planes to pull its people out.

At the stricken plant itself, Chinook helicopters dumped tonnes of water in a desperate effort to cool reactors crippled by Friday's massive earthquake and tsunami, which pulverised the northeast coast and left countless thousands homeless and enduring bitterly cold conditions.

The official toll of the dead and missing now exceeds 14,650, police said, with the number of confirmed dead at 5,178 in the country's biggest catastrophe since World War II.

As Japanese and international teams mounted a massive search and relief effort, reports from some battered coastal towns suggested the final toll could be far higher.

Millions have been left without water, electricity, fuel or enough food and hundreds of thousands more are homeless, the misery compounded by heavy snowfalls, freezing cold and wet conditions.

The tense nation also saw the stockmarket fall again Thursday, closing down 1.44 percent on fears about the economic impact -- concerns that have also seen global stocks drop.

The massive 9.0 magnitude earthquake shifted Japan more than two metres away from the neighbouring Korean peninsula, scientists said.

The helicopter operation at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant on the Pacific coast, some 250 kilometres (155 miles) northeast of Tokyo, aims to keep the fuel rods inside reactors and containment pools submerged under water.

The latest threat at the plant was the fuel-rod pools, which contain used fuel rods that have been withdrawn from reactors yet remain highly radioactive.

They are immersed in cooling water for many years until they shed enough heat to become manageable for storage.

Water in one of the pools was evaporating because of the rods' heat, and temperatures were slowly rising in two other pools because coolant pumps were knocked out by the March 11 tsunami, experts say.

They warned that if the tanks run dry and leave the fuel rods exposed, the rods could melt or catch fire, creating potentially lethal levels of radiation.

At the same time, Japanese engineers were focused on restoring the power supply to the stricken power plant in an attempt to reactivate its cooling system.

"If the restoration work is completed, we will be able to activate various electric pumps and pour water into reactors and pools for spent nuclear fuel," a spokesman for Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. told AFP.

US President Barack Obama offered to give Japan any support that it needs, in a telephone call with Prime Minister Naoto Kan, the Japanese leader's spokesman said.

But as crews battled to prevent an atomic disaster, more foreign governments urged their citizens to steer clear of quake-stricken northeast Japan and the capital Tokyo.

"If you're in Tokyo or any of the affected prefectures... we are saying that you should depart," said Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd.

Britain, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands and New Zealand also advised nationals to leave or shun the northeast region.

Indian technology firms were helping employees to leave, with software firm L&T Infotech saying it had chartered a plane to take all 185 of its staff and their families out of Japan.

US officials warned nationals living within 80 kilometres (50 miles) of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant to evacuate or seek shelter.

The Japanese government has told people living up to 10 kilometres (six miles) beyond a 20-kilometre exclusion zone around the plant to stay indoors. More than 200,000 people have already been evacuated from the zone.

The evacuation plans came against a background of mounting concern over the possibility of a nuclear catastrophe.

"The site is effectively out of control," the European Union's energy chief Guenther Oettinger told a European Parliament committee, a day after he said Japan was facing "apocalypse".

France's Nuclear Safety Authority said the disaster now equated to a six on the seven-point international scale for nuclear accidents, ranking the crisis second in gravity only to the level-seven Chernobyl disaster in 1986.

US Energy Secretary Steven Chu said the events in Japan "actually appear to be more serious" than the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island, a partial reactor meltdown that led to small releases of radioactivity.

"To what extent we don't really know now," Chu said in Washington.

Gregory Jaczko, chair of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, warned there was no water left in the spent fuel pool of the plant's number-four reactor, resulting in "extremely high" radiation levels.

The UN's International Atomic Energy Agency chief Yukiya Amano said the situation was "very serious" as he prepared to fly out to see the damage for himself.

Japan's chief government spokesman Yukio Edano said radiation levels from the plant posed no immediate health threat outside the 20-kilometre exclusion zone despite slightly elevated levels detected in Tokyo over the past few days.




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Unique Japan tsunami footage boon to scientists
Sydney (AFP) March 16, 2011
Vision of the disastrous tsunami rolling onto Japan after last week's massive 9.0-magnitude earthquake will provide valuable data to scientists for years to come, Australian experts said Wednesday. Compelling images of the monster wave crashing onto low-lying farmland in Japan's northeast, sweeping all in its path into a surging waterway, was played live by television stations as helicopter- ... read more

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