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FLORA AND FAUNA
Ivory trade ban up for vote at UN wildlife summit
by Staff Writers
Geneva (AFP) Oct 05, 2012


Warming bringing exotic birds to Britain
London (UPI) Oct 5, 2012 - Climate change could see the spread into Britain of exotic bird species from other parts of Europe, ornithologists say.

While Britain has suffered massive declines in the last 10 years in many native garden and farmland birds, including the turtle dove, warming temperatures could see exotic birds like the hoopoe, fantailed warbler and great reed warbler arriving in the future, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds said.

The charity predicts the purple heron, black kite and tiny serin could also spread to Britain, The Daily Telegraph reported Friday.

The bird that has seen the largest overall increase in the past decade with climate change is the little egret, a small heron usually only found on the main European Continent.

The south of England has also been colonized by the Mediterranean gull, ornithologists said.

And black woodpeckers, much bigger than the British native green woodpeckers, are already in northern France may cross the Channel, although chances are slim since the species doesn't like to cross large bodies of water, they said.

The question of whether to extend a trade ban on African ivory is set for a vote at the next meeting of UN wildlife trade regulator CITES, the organisation said Friday.

It is "probably the most contentious issue" at the Bangkok conference in March, said John Scanlon, the head of CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.

Citing the "highest level of illegal killing and trade in 20 years", Scanlon said the meeting offered a chance to halt the "spike in poaching in ivory" since there was "consensus around taking measures to stop it".

CITES members had presented 67 proposals for and against a total trade ban, he told reporters in Geneva.

One was a call by four nations -- Burkina Faso, Kenya, Mali and Togo -- for a blanket ban on ivory from all 38 countries in Africa where elephants live until 2017.

At present only four countries were affected -- Namibia, Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe -- CITES said.

Another proposal, by Tanzania, would allow that country to sell 101 tonnes of stockpiled ivory and also trade in elephant hunting trophies.

Under CITES rules, proposals are adopted by a two-thirds majority, Scanlon said, adding that at the last global conference in Doha in 2010, 25 out of 42 proposals got the green light.

In addition to the bid to beef up restrictions on the ivory trade, other members sought tougher measures to protect the white rhino (Kenya), the white-tip shark (Colombia, US), and manta ray (Ecuador).

The United States, meanwhile, pushed for a total halt in the trade of polar bear parts and products, claiming that climate change had shrunk the animal's natural habitat and it therefore qualified as an endangered species.

The 176 member states will also get a chance to vote on proposals to boost the protection of hammerhead sharks and the porbeagle fish -- both narrowly defeated two years ago.

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Homolog of mammalian neocortex found in bird brain
Chicago IL (SPX) Oct 05, 2012
A seemingly unique part of the human and mammalian brain is the neocortex, a layered structure on the outer surface of the organ where most higher-order processing is thought to occur. But new research at the University of Chicago has found the cells similar to those of the mammalian neocortex in the brains of birds, sitting in a vastly different anatomical structure. The work, published i ... read more


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