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FLORA AND FAUNA
Kenya fines ivory smuggler less than a dollar a piece
by Staff Writers
Nairobi (AFP) March 26, 2013


Thailand seizes 104 smuggled endangered pangolins
Bangkok (AFP) March 26, 2013 - The Thai navy on Tuesday said it had intercepted wildlife traffickers attempting to smuggle 104 endangered pangolins to China on the Mekong river.

The creatures, prized for their skin, scales and meat and hunted extensively in Southeast Asia, are believed to have originated in Malaysia or southern Thailand.

"The pangolins were on their way to Laos and then finally China," said Lieutenant Commander Garan Minwong of the Thai navy's Mekong river task force in the country's northern border area.

He said two suspects were arrested during the raid late Monday before they were able to load the live pangolins onto a boat.

Thailand, seen as a hub for traffickers of all endangered species, came under pressure over the rampant smuggling of ivory through its territory during Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) talks in Bangkok this month.

A Chinese smuggler caught in Kenya with a haul of ivory was fined less than a dollar (euro) a piece, wildlife officials said Tuesday.

Kenya Wildlife Service spokesman Paul Udoto said that Chinese smuggler Tian Yi was arrested on Sunday while in transit in Nairobi carrying 439 pieces of worked ivory.

The ivory, cut into finger-length sections and painted brown, was "hidden in a suitcase and mixed with tree bark to disguise it as traditional medicine," Udoto said in a statement.

Tian -- who was arrested as he travelled from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Hong Kong -- was on Monday fined $350 (270 euros) and has since been set free, Udoto added.

Experts suggest a kilogramme of ivory has an estimated black market value of some $2,500.

Poaching has spiked recently in East Africa but the courts are hampered by sentencing limits that treat smuggling as a petty crime.

Udoto said that officers had "intensified security operations and surveillance" to curb wildlife related crimes.

The illegal ivory trade is mostly fuelled by demand in Asia and the Middle East, where elephant tusks and rhinoceros horns are used to make ornaments and in traditional medicine.

Trade in elephant ivory, with rare exceptions, has been outlawed since 1989 after elephant populations in Africa dwindled from millions in the mid-20th century to some 600,000 by the end of the 1980s.

Africa is now home to an estimated 472,000 elephants, whose survival is threatened by poaching as well as a rising human population that is causing habitat loss.

Cameras to track tiger numbers in Bangladesh census
Dhaka (AFP) March 26, 2013 - Bangladesh is to launch a census of tigers next month living in the world's largest mangrove forest in a bid to determine the full extent of the threat to their survival, scientists said on Tuesday.

Yunus Ali, head of the forestry department, said conservationists would fan out across the Bangladeshi side of the Sundarbans to install cameras on trees to obtain a more accurate estimate of tiger numbers since the last census in 2004.

That survey estimated that 440 Royal Bengal Tigers were on the Bangladeshi side. The forest, which includes parts of India's West Bengal state, spans a total of 10,000 square kilometres (3,860 square miles).

But some experts have criticised the methodology used last time around, which relied on the tracking of footprints and, together with a real decline blamed on poachers, believe the current figure could be less than half that amount.

The Bangladeshi scientists will be assisted by wildlife experts from the US-based Smithsonian Conservation and Biology Institute, Ali told AFP Tuesday.

Scientists hope the cameras will help them compile a more accurate figure over the next two years.

"The pugmark (tracking) system created controversies. It's not reliable," Ali said, adding that the new survey should "end all the debate".

Monirul Khan, a zoology professor at Bangladesh's Jahangirnagar University and the nation's foremost tiger expert, expected the survey to confirm his fears that there were no more than 200 tigers on the Bangladeshi side.

"Camera trapping is a far better and more widely accepted technique. If it is done scientifically, it can give an accurate result," he said.

Khan said that around five tigers were killed every year either by villagers trying to protect themselves or by poachers who then sell on their skins or even body parts which are prized in Asia as an aphrodisiac.

There are around 1,850 Bengal tigers living in the wild, according to the WWF conservation group, including around 1,300 tigers in India.

A census on the Indian side of the Sundarbans, conducted between 2003-04 put the numbers at around 270, although some experts say the real figure is actually less than 100.

A similar survey is currently under way in the Tarai Arc Landscape, a forest region which straddles Nepal and India.

The WWF says tigers worldwide are in serious danger of becoming extinct in the wild. Their numbers have fallen from 100,000 in 1900 to around 3,200 now.

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FLORA AND FAUNA
Rare find: two new species join primate club
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