Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




FROTH AND BUBBLE
Lab-on-a-chip detects trace levels of toxic vapors in homes near Utah Air Force Base
by Staff Writers
Ann Arbor MI (SPX) Jul 03, 2012


Core microanalytical components of the recently field-tested U-M analyzer. Image courtesy: Edward T. Zellers.

A lab-on-a-chip technology that measures trace amounts of air contaminants in homes was successfully field-tested by researchers at the University of Michigan. Even in the presence of 50 other indoor air contaminants, the U-M-built microsystem found levels of the targeted contaminant so low that it would be analogous to finding a particular silver dollar in a roll stretching from Detroit to Salt Lake City.

"This is the first (known) study of its kind," said Ted Zellers, professor in the U-M School of Public Health and the Department of Chemistry, and project director.

"Most lab-on-a-chip technologies are used for biomedical analysis of liquids," Zellers said. "Our technology is designed for monitoring contaminants in the air, and this groundbreaking study is the first to prove that it can work outside the laboratory in real-life applications."

The applications are potentially limitless because the device, called a microfabricated gas chromatograph, can be tailored to detect any contaminants, Zellers said. For instance, the team is adapting the same technology to detect certain industrial chemicals in the breath and saliva of exposed workers, biomarkers of cancer and other chronic disease, and markers of explosives for airport screening applications.

The Department of Defense contracted the U-M team to adapt and test two prototypes devices in homes near Utah's Hill Air Force Base to measure indoor concentrations of trichloroethylene, or TCE. TCE was used on military bases until the 1970s, and improper disposal caused TCE to become a pervasive groundwater contaminant that can seep into homes above plumes.

"The core microfabricated silicon chips, when stacked, are roughly the size of a wristwatch," Zellers said. They require less power and can be made smaller and less expensively than traditionally manufactured counterparts.

The microsystem was designed and built by faculty and students affiliated with the Center for Wireless Integrated MicroSensing and Systems in the College of Engineering.

Zellers said the group is currently negotiating with several companies interested in commercializing the technology.

A series of articles describing the results appeared this month in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. Co-authors include Sun Kyu Kim, Hungwei Chang, and Jonathan Bryant-Genevier, of U-M; David Burris of IST, Inc., and Kyle Gorder and Erik Dettenmeier of Hill Air Force Base.

.


Related Links
University of Michigan
Our Polluted World and Cleaning It Up






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





FROTH AND BUBBLE
Guinness says Philippine croc world's largest
Manila (AFP) July 2, 2012
A saltwater crocodile weighing more than a tonne and suspected of killing two people in the Philippines has been declared the largest such reptile in captivity by the Guinness Book of World Records. The 6.17-metre (20.24-foot) male, nicknamed "Lolong", was captured in the Agusan marsh on the southern island of Mindanao last September after a two-year search following the killing of a girl an ... read more


FROTH AND BUBBLE
Jakarta, Canberra boost asylum cooperation

Google urges governments to share disaster data

20 killed as fuel truck crash in China sparks fire

Record radiation levels detected at Fukushima reactor

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Body scanner takes tailoring to the masses

H.K.'s SCMP editor under fire as press freedom 'shrinks'

Apple pays $60 mn to end China iPad trademark row

Now Everyone Can Build a Satellite Like NASA: Online!

FROTH AND BUBBLE
India's monsoon seen picking up after slow start

Saving the Baltic Sea

Dying trees in Southwest set stage for erosion, water loss in Colorado River

Research Vessel Winds Down Visit to Vietnam

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Study: Wrong diet doomed 1912 polar try

Scientists to produce first 3-D models of Arctic sea ice

Canada builds up arctic region defenses

Greenland ice may exaggerate magnitude of 13,000-year-old deep freeze

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Screening horticultural imports: New models assess plant risk through better analysis

Scientists urge new approaches to plant research

Want bigger plants? Get to the root of the matter

S. Korean farmers rally against China trade talks

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Northeast India floods kill 79, displace two million

Shallow 6.3-magnitude quake hits northwest China

Floods swamp eastern India, 1.3 million displaced

UCSB scientists compile first study of potential for tsunamis in northwestern California

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Chimpanzees cleared after mauling American in S.Africa: park

Rwanda gorillas prosper despite guerrillas next door

Kenyan army hunts kidnappers of four foreign aid workers

23,000 Angolans back home as refugee status ends

FROTH AND BUBBLE
Seabirds studied for clues to human aging

Hong Kong's land shortage forces bereaved to sea

Diet of early human relative Australopithecus shows surprises

Outside View: 18th-century words for today




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement