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. LockMart To Create Incident Management Analysis System For The US Dept Of Interior

The IMARS system will be implemented, across the United States and its territories, and will be used to manage incident information relative to the agency's people and sites, which include more than 4,000 law enforcement officers, 500 million acres, more than 18,000 buildings, 13,000 trails and more than 400 million visitors annually.
by Staff Writers
Gaithersburg MD (SPX) Oct 26, 2006
The U.S. Department of the Interior has selected Lockheed Martin to create a public safety law enforcement system that will enable the agency to identify, collect, store, retrieve, analyze, manage and report information related to incidents. The Incident Management Analysis and Reporting System (IMARS), will begin as a six-month pilot and is worth $4.4 million. Lockheed Martin's team members include Interact Public Safety Systems and Denali Solutions.

IMARS will enable Department of the Interior users to create reports in various formats, sort data, conduct data analysis and interface with other systems, both within and external to the agency. IMARS will provide an enhanced ability to:

- Prevent, detect and investigate criminal activity including crimes against persons and property;

- Protect natural and cultural resources;

- Analyze and prioritize protection efforts; and

- Manage visitor use and protection programs.

"We are pleased to work with the Department of the Interior to create an incident management system that will enhance staff and visitor safety at its sites throughout the country and territories," said Gordon McElroy, vice president, Intelligence and Homeland Security Systems. "IMARS is an information-sharing database and service that will enable DOI bureaus to share real-time information throughout its network, and is a system similar to those used today by other federal law enforcement organizations."

The system will be implemented, across the United States and its territories, and will be used to manage incident information relative to the agency's people and sites, which include more than 4,000 law enforcement officers, 500 million acres, more than 18,000 buildings, 13,000 trails and more than 400 million visitors annually. The incident information typically generated at these multiple sites comes from incidents such as law enforcement, search and rescue, emergency management services, and wildland and structural fires. IMARS will allow for new data exchange requirements such as the FBI's National Data Exchange (N-DEx) initiative.

Department of the Interior officials are expected to evaluate the capabilities, service, and results of IMARS during the six-month pilot. Final decisions about continuing the service will occur after the pilot is complete.

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Lancaster UK (SPX) Oct 19, 2006
An intelligent flood monitoring system that could give advance warning of the type of rapid flood that engulfed the UK Cornish village of Boscastle in 2004, is under test in the Yorkshire Dales. Danny Hughes, Phil Greenwood and colleagues from Lancaster University won an award for their paper describing the system at the UK e-Science All Hands Meeting in Nottingham last month.

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