Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
Malaysian police arrest tribespeople protesting dam
by Staff Writers
Kuala Lumpur (AFP) Nov 07, 2013


Malaysian police on Thursday arrested eight tribespeople blocking access to a dam which they say will displace them from their lands, amid increasing protests on Borneo island.

Police arrested the eight Penans including two teenagers, took down banners and dismantled wooden barriers on the road to the remote $1.3 billion Murum dam in Sarawak state, said activist Raymond Abin.

Abin, an official with the NGO Save Sarawak's Rivers Network, said some 100 other Penans remained at the site to continue the blockade.

"The authorities just find that this is the only way to deal with the people -- refusing to deal with their demands," Abin told AFP. "The easy way is to arrest them in order to intimidate and threaten them."

A local police official confirmed eight were in custody but declined to comment further. Abin said the Penans were not told the reason for their arrest.

The Penans set up the blockade in September to demand 500,000 ringgit ($157,000) for the loss of their land, property and livelihood.

The dam is expected to flood 245 square kilometres (95 square miles) and cause 1,500 Penan and 80 Kenyah natives to lose their homes.

Sarawak Energy said the 944-megawatt dam began filling in late September and would be completed within 14 months.

It added that relocation of affected natives was set to be completed by year-end and insisted that displaced villagers were being compensated fairly.

The company dismissed the protest as "instigated" by activists.

The Murum dam is one of a series of hydroelectric facilities planned by the Sarawak state government as it pushes economic development in one of Malaysia's poorest states.

But the building spree in the resource-rich state along the powerful jungle rivers has been dogged by controversy.

Activists allege massive corruption, while natives complain it has flooded rainforests and uprooted tens of thousands of people.

Hundreds of Malaysian tribespeople have also blockaded the construction site of the nearby Baram dam.

While the Baram dam is expected to generate 1,200 megawatts of power, activists claim it will flood 400 square kilometres of rainforest (154 square miles) and displace 20,000 tribespeople.

Sarawak's longtime chief minister Taib Mahmud has faced mounting accusations of enriching himself and cronies through a stranglehold on the state's economy, charges which he denies.

.


Related Links
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Brazil court orders resumption of work on Amazon dam
Brasilia, Brazil (AFP) Oct 30, 2013
A Brazilian court on Wednesday ordered work to resume on a dam in the Amazon, reversing a ruling that had ordered a stoppage over environmental concerns, the project consortium said. A Norte Energia statement said the president of the Federal Court in Brasilia lifted the suspension on the Belo Monte dam. Another judge had ordered the consortium to halt the work Friday, saying it had not ... read more


WATER WORLD
Survivors desperate for aid in typhoon-ravaged Philippines

Space technologies boost disaster reduction int'l co-op

How to Manage Nature's Runaway Freight Trains

Uruguay to pull peacekeepers from Haiti: president

WATER WORLD
Highly stable quantum light source for applications in quantum information systems

Quantum 'sealed envelope' system enables 'perfectly secure' information storage

London Metal Exchange announces warehouse shake-up

Monkeys use minds to move two virtual arms

WATER WORLD
Malaysian police arrest tribespeople protesting dam

Veolia reports sales slip, shares surge

The nitrogen puzzle in the oceans

Rising temperatures challenge Salt Lake City's water supply

WATER WORLD
The Arctic ceases to be a 'province'

Search on for oldest antarctic ice in hunt for ancient climate clues

Stowaways threaten fisheries in the Arctic

The search for the oldest ice cores

WATER WORLD
Improved legume technologies can boost entire farming system from the ground up

Health benefits of wild blueberries abound: Study

Researchers slam palm oil initiative as industry meets

China exchange hatches plan for egg futures

WATER WORLD
600,000 were evacuated as typhoon nears Vietnam: officials

One of most intense typhoons ever recorded hits Philippines

More than 10,000 feared dead in typhoon-ravaged Philippines

Improving earthquake early warning systems for California and Taiwan

WATER WORLD
Controversial Tanzanian anti-poaching drive to continue: Kikwete

African leaders discuss rapid-deployment emergency force

Hong Kong firm debuts in Africa with $104m S.African deal

Tanzania halts anti-poaching drive after abuse claims

WATER WORLD
Scientists tracking Brazilian wildlife find ancient cave paintings

Study: Humans made sophisticated stone tools earlier than thought

Did hard-wired fear of snakes drive evolution of human vision?

Hair regeneration method is first to induce new human hair growth




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement