Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




EARLY EARTH
Mass extinction may not cause all organisms to 'shrink'
by Staff Writers
London, UK (SPX) Feb 12, 2014


The authors suggest that the lack of size change in the majority of bryozoans studied here may indicate that the Lilliput effect is not universal at all levels, and that the response may vary across organisms.

The sizes of organisms following mass extinction events may vary more than previously thought, which may be inconsistent with the predictions of the so-called 'Lilliput effect,' according to a study published in PLOS ONE on February 5, 2014 by Caroline Sogot from University of Cambridge and colleagues.

Scientists associate mass extinction events like the Cretaceous-Paleogene (abbreviated K-Pg) event with a reduction in organism size in the aftermath, a phenomenon termed 'the Lilliput effect.'

These pronounced changes are thought to be in response to lower food availability and other alterations in the environment that can occur following a mass extinction event.

Therefore, survivors of the K-Pg mass extinction should exhibit smaller body size than their pre-extinction relatives. To delve more into this effect, scientists investigated the changes in size of an aquatic invertebrate at the individual- and colony-level before and after the mass extinction.

Scientists analyzed of the 59 bryozoan species and found no significant change in body length. Additionally, the sizes of two types of bryozoan colonies, 210 Maastrichtian colonies and 163 Danian colonies, did not show consistent size decrease before and after the K-Pg extinction event, although maximum colony size did decline in three out of four surviving types of bryozoan.

The authors suggest that the lack of size change in the majority of bryozoans studied here may indicate that the Lilliput effect is not universal at all levels, and that the response may vary across organisms.

Dr. Sogot added, "The absence of a clear 'Lilliput effect' in the bryozoans analysed in this study suggests that not all organisms respond in the same manner to all mass extinction events."

Sogot CE, Harper EM, Taylor PD (2014) The Lilliput Effect in Colonial Organisms: Cheilostome Bryozoans at the Cretaceous-Paleogene Mass Extinction. PLoS ONE 9(2): e87048. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087048

.


Related Links
PLOS
Explore The Early Earth at TerraDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





UAV Payloads 2014, 24 - 25 June - London, UK
EARLY EARTH
Mass extinction happened fast: study
Washington (AFP) Feb 10, 2014
Something wiped out nearly all life on Earth more than 250 million years ago, and whatever unleashed this mass die-off acted much faster than previously thought, scientists said Monday. Based on an analysis of rocks in China, the end-Permian extinction occurred over the course of 60,000 years, give or take 48,000, researchers reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. ... read more


EARLY EARTH
New Zealand takes delivery of General Dynamics mobile bridges

As battle rages around historic castle, Syria's heritage faces ruin

British princes help out as storm claims two lives

165,000 without power in storm-battered Ireland

EARLY EARTH
Space junk endangers mankind's usual course of life

Scientists use 'voting' and 'penalties' to overcome quantum errors

Theorists predict new forms of exotic insulating materials

From Stone Age to Space Age: bone pigment helps probe

EARLY EARTH
Fish biomass in the ocean is 10 times higher than estimated

Fiji leader invites climate-hit Kiribati residents to relocate

Water crisis brings threats of Mideast war, terrorism: report

Meeting the eye-witnesses of ocean change

EARLY EARTH
US to appoint Arctic envoy

Ice age's arctic tundra lush with wildflowers for woolly mammoths

Chinese sailors throw bottles into Antarctic Ocean: report

Research gives new insight into diet of large ancient mammals

EARLY EARTH
EU plans more tests for horsemeat in food

Danone says will double stake in Chinese milk firm Mengniu

New GM corn gets controversial EU go-ahead

Brazil soy, corn production overcome drought

EARLY EARTH
Indonesia orders 200,000 to evacuate as volcano erupts

Britain gets respite from flooding crisis

Three dead, flights disrupted as Indonesia volcano erupts

Storms, high winds batter flooded parts of Britain

EARLY EARTH
Boko Haram raid kills nine Nigeria troops

France in race to find troops for EU C.Africa mission

Africans get a kick out of Shaolin kung fu

Poaching threatens savannah ecosystems

EARLY EARTH
Mobile apps shake up world of dating

For new study, 100 people commit their bodies to science

Population bomb may be defused, but research reveals ticking household bomb

The genetic origins of high-altitude adaptations in Tibetans




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement