Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Maths could help search and rescue ships sail more safely in heavy seas
by Staff Writers
London, UK (SPX) Mar 21, 2016


File image.

A unique new computer model built on highly complex mathematics could make it possible to design safer versions of the 'fast ships' widely used in search and rescue, anti-drugs, anti-piracy and many other vital offshore operations.

Travelling at up to 23-30 knots, fast ships are especially vulnerable to waves that amplify suddenly due to local weather and sea conditions - extreme funnelling effects, for example, may turn waves a few metres high into dangerous waves tens of metres tall that can destabilise ships, resulting in damage, causing injuries and threatening lives.

Developed with Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) support at the University of Leeds by Dr Anna Kalogirou and Dr Vijaya Ambati with Professor Onno Bokhove, the new model produces unprecedentedly accurate animations and simulations that can show exactly how sea waves can affect fast ships. It highlights the importance of having accurate predictions of the pressure forces that these craft are subjected to, and could aid the design of fast ships better able to withstand the effects of rough seas.

The researchers can already simulate the complex interactions of sea waves that can lead to an anomalously high freak wave, but adding the motion of ships into the equation complicates matters significantly.

Dr Kalogirou said: "We have managed to develop a simulation tool that uses sophisticated mathematical methods and produces fast and accurate simulations of linear wave-ship interactions. Our tool can also provide measurements in terms of wave amplitudes around ships, as well as pressures on ships' surfaces."

The aim is to extend the model over the next three years to produce a tool that can be used extensively by ship designers and maritime engineers.

The model has been validated through laboratory experiments on a man-made freak or rogue wave (the so-called 'soliton splash') using test tanks. A comparison with wave and ship motion, for a ship moored on two anchors, has been set up in a small test tank, which is also used for public demonstrations.

Results from the project are being disseminated to a range of organisations including the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN). A related European Industry Doctorate project with MARIN on rogue and breaking waves against offshore structures has strengthened Professor Bokhove's EPSRC-funded research on wave impact against ships, as well as his EU-funded work on fixed offshore structures.

Fast ships deliver all kinds of services in fields such as disaster response, the fight against crime, the provision of supplies for oil and gas platforms and the transportation of wind farm maintenance personnel. Each year, however, around 100 such ships worldwide are lost or damaged in heavy seas, with around 2,500 casualties in 2013.

Professor Bokhove says: "Describing mathematically the complex behaviour of waves and their interaction with fast ships and then incorporating all of this into a robust computer model has been very challenging. We're delighted to have provided further proof of how advanced mathematics can have real-world applications that help save money and safeguard lives."

.


Related Links
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
DISASTER MANAGEMENT
On patrol with Macedonian troops at Europe's closed gate
Gevgelija, Macedonia (AFP) March 16, 2016
Macedonian soldiers trudge through torrential rain in a borderland once home to quiet vineyards, searching for migrants trying to sneak through a hole in the locked-down gate to western Europe. The voices of refugee children drift across from Greece, just the other side of barbed-wire topped fencing, where a multitude of colourful tents can be seen with clothes strung out on lines between th ... read more


DISASTER MANAGEMENT
US military personnel punished over Afghan hospital attack

After lifejacket art and border piano recitel, Ai Weiwei gets migrant haircut

Prince Harry hopes to draw focus to quake-hit Nepal with visit

Colombia hostilities disrupt 250,000 children's lives since 2013: report

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Virtual reality girds for test in marketplace

British mathematician solves Fermat's Last Theorem

The updated crystalline sponge method

Unique optical trapping system offers way to launch high-power laser light

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Acidification stops shrimp chorus

Governor insists there's blame to share on Flint water crisis

Global shift in farmed fish feed may impact nutritional benefits ascribed to seafood

Dueling Climate Cycles May Increase Sea Level Swings

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Early Earth was colder than previously thought

Climate warming accelerating carbon loss from thawing Arctic soils

Nature study reveals rapid ice-wedge loss across Arctic

Carbon from land played a role during last deglaciation

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
French MPs slash 'Nutella tax' after Indonesia, Malaysia protest

Hindu cow activists drink pesticide in India, one dies

Mongolia herders face disaster: Red Cross

How more Research funding can hasten green revolution

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Wetland enhancement in Midwest could help reduce catastrophic floods of the future

Pakistan rains leave 42 dead: officials

Japan's tsunami: Five things after five years

Pakistan rains leave 28 dead: officials

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
China and Gambia resume diplomatic ties: ministry

Nigeria's ex-defence chief raided staff salary funds to buy property, court told

Bank of China gains foothold in Morocco

Seven dead in clashes in Africa's oldest wildlife reserve in DR Congo

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
400,000-year-old fossils from Spain provide earliest genetic evidence of Neandertals

How the brain detects short sounds

Neanderthal diet: Only 20 percent vegetarian

Early human habitat, recreated for first time, shows life was no picnic




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.