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SHAKE AND BLOW
Mexican volcano rumbles, but residents shrug it off
by Staff Writers
Santiago Xalitzintla, Mexico (AFP) May 14, 2013


Mexico volcano spews ash on towns
Mexico City (AFP) May 15, 2013 - Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano spewed a new column of ash late Tuesday, with some of the material falling on three towns while glowing rocks landed on the towering mountain's slope.

The volcano, known locally as "Popo" and "Don Goyo," belched out a cloud of ash that rose four kilometers (2.5 miles) above its crater at 8:21 pm (0121 GMT Wednesday), according to the National Disaster Prevention Center.

The ministry said "light quantities of ash" dropped on Paso de Cortes, a Mexico state community at the foot of the volcano, and the towns of Atlixco and Huejotzingo in the state of Puebla, some 23 kilometers away.

Molten rocks were thrown one kilometer away, landing on the volcano's northern slope.

The smoke was blowing toward the northeast. Mexico City is 55 kilometers (34 miles) northwest of Popocatepetl.

The volcano had already spewed some ash and rocks Tuesday morning but a senior official later reported that it had calmed down. The disaster prevention center reported low-level activity later on, including a 40-minute low-intensity tremor.

The 5,452-meter (17,887-foot) high volcano has been rumbling and spewing steam, ash and rocks sporadically for days, prompting authorities to raise the alert level and prepare for possible evacuations last weekend.

Last week, Popocatepetl covered several towns in ash, including the capital of Puebla state.

Authorities have raised the alert level to "Yellow Phase Three," the fifth of a seven-stage warning system, restricting access to an area of 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) around the volcano while preparing evacuation routes and shelters.

Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano has blown steam for days, prompting authorities to prepare for possible evacuations, but residents are used to their towering neighbor's rumblings and keep fearlessly heading to work.

Popocatepetl, which means "smoking mountain" in the Nahuatl language of the Aztecs, spewed more steam, gas and ash that rose three kilometers (two miles) above the crater early Tuesday, according to the National Disaster Prevention Center.

National civil protection coordinator Luis Enrique Puentes said the volcano was "totally calm" following the eruption, which belched out glowing rocks. While there was no immediate need to evacuate the population, the volcano could erupt again Wednesday, he added.

The volcano, which is 55 kilometers (34 miles) southeast of Mexico City, has also rumbled and spewed molten rocks in recent days. Last week, it covered several towns in ash, including the capital of Puebla state.

Authorities have raised the alert level to "Yellow Phase Three," the fifth of a seven-stage warning system, restricting access to an area of 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) around the volcano and preparing evacuation routes.

But people living in the nearby town of Santiago Xalitzintla appear calm despite the activity inside the 5,452-meter (17,887-foot) high volcano, known locally as "Gregorio" or "Don Goyo" and considered a magical rainmaker by indigenous populations.

"We go out, we look at it and we go back to sleep very soundly," said Guadalupe de Santiago, balancing a basket of candy on her head near a church in this town just 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) south of the volcano.

"(The volcano) takes care of us. Look at all the water he's sending us," she said as rain fell on her.

Hundreds of soldiers were sent to Santiago Xalitzintla and two other towns in case the volcano erupts and forces the evacuation of 11,000 residents in this area surrounded by corn fields and small cattle farms.

The soldiers checked the condition of roads in case they need to be used for an evacuation and the two shelters were set up in the state of Puebla to house 5,000 people.

Around 4.5 million people live within 50 kilometers (31 miles) of Popocatepetl, which had its last major eruption in 2000, forcing thousands of people to evacuate from surrounding towns.

But few residents evacuated in May 2012 when the volcano belched out ash, forcing the Puebla airport to close temporarily.

"We won't go to the shelter again if they tell us the same thing," Santiago said.

"Things got stolen from our house last year. All our animals were gone and nothing had happened up there," she said, pointing at the crater.

Every March 12, dozens of residents climb part of the volcano in an annual ceremony, leaving flowers, food and drinks as offerings to ask "Gregorio" to produce rain.

"We celebrate his birthday and ask him for rain and a good harvest," said Juan Garcia Agustin, the town's top official.

Agustin, who has checked the dirt roads that will be used in case of an evacuation, said residents would take shelter set up inside a school gym in the town of Cholula if necessary. Some 100 cots were ready, with bags on top of them filled with hygiene products.

But the shelter's doctor on duty, Juan Manuel Garcia, said residents are loath to evacuate.

"People are reluctant to leave their homes because experience tells them that nothing even happened before and that nothing will happen if they disobey evacuation orders," he said. "However, if they risk losing their animals and belongings, they'll listen."

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