Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



WATER WORLD
More bang for the buck
by Staff Writers
Santa Barbara CA (SPX) Mar 03, 2017


Sediment runoff from roads like this in West Maui affects corals' ability to photosynthesize. Image courtesy Kirsten Oleson.

Land-based pollutants have been linked to the degradation of several Hawaiian reefs. Take West Maui, for instance, where coral ecosystems are so impacted that reefs and watersheds have been recognized by multiple state and federal programs as in need of special protection.

Between 2000 and 2015, coral cover on West Maui's northern reefs has dramatically declined from 30 percent to 10 percent. The likely culprit: sediment runoff during rain events. Corals' ability to photosynthesize and grow is compromised in the presence of sediment, which in turn allows for algae to take over.

To address the challenge of managing such pollutants with limited resources, two senior fellows at UC Santa Barbara's National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Carrie Kappel and Kim Selkoe, worked with University of Hawaii ecological economist Kirsten Oleson to determine which scenarios offered the best solutions.

They found that cooperation among landowners to reduce sediment runoff to near-shore reefs results in more cost-efficient and ecologically effective outcomes than acting independently. The findings appear in the Journal of Environmental Management.

"It's critical for landowners and watershed managers to consider the big picture," said co-author Kappel. "We show that the best outcomes result from making choices based on cost-effectiveness - the ones that give you the biggest bang for your buck - and working together."

The research team used simple methods to identify cost-effective solutions to address erosion from unpaved agricultural roads - a problem common to many areas in Hawaii and elsewhere. They compared the costs and benefits of alternative actions that could be taken to repair agricultural roads and reduce sediment runoff across the West Maui landscape.

Seven management scenarios were considered, defined by whether decisions were made cooperatively or independently among landowners and by the approach to road repair (minimizing costs, minimizing sediment or both).

The investigators showed that targeting specific runoff "hotspots" is more cost-effective than targeting all road segments within a given land parcel. In addition, the best environmental gains for the lowest economic costs are achieved when landowners cooperate and target cost-effective road repairs, although collective action alone becomes counterproductive when cost-effectiveness is ignored.

"Managers are generally working with really tight budgets, especially in Hawaii," Selkoe said. "Decision support tools like this one, which quantify the tradeoffs, can help them identify the most effective ways to put their limited resources to work to protect vulnerable coral reefs."

This research is part of the larger Ocean Tipping Points project, which seeks to understand and characterize dramatic shifts in ocean ecosystems and develop new tools to help managers avoid or respond to such shifts.

WATER WORLD
First direct measurements of Pacific seabed sediments reveal strong methane source
London, UK (SPX) Mar 01, 2017
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered a major source of an important greenhouse gas in the Tropical Pacific Ocean for the first time. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, and a major contributor to increasing global temperatures. The largest pool of marine methane on Earth spans from the coast of Central America to Hawaii in the Tropical Pacific Ocean. ... read more

Related Links
University of California - Santa Barbara
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

WATER WORLD
War-scarred Syrian children may be 'lost to trauma': aid group

115 migrants rescued, 25 missing: Libya navy

Thousands flee anti-IS offensives in Iraq and Syria

Haitians' ire over carnival spending amid hurricane's ruins

WATER WORLD
New use for paper industry's sludge and fly ash in plastics

Turning food waste into tires

Coffee-ring effect leads to crystallization control

Researchers use laser-generated bubbles to create 3-D images in liquid

WATER WORLD
Underwater mountains help ocean water rise from abyss

More bang for the buck

Syrian farmers fear IS to flood villages near Euphrates

First direct measurements of Pacific seabed sediments reveal strong methane source

WATER WORLD
UN reports Antarctica's highest temperatures on record

Air pollution may have masked mid-20th Century sea ice loss

International team reports ocean acidification spreading rapidly in Arctic Ocean

Arctic sea ice decline influences European weather

WATER WORLD
Hand-picked specialty crops 'ripe' for precision agriculture techniques

Researchers propose using CRISPR to accelerate plant domestication

Magic cover crop carpet

Colombia's 'drug triangle' puts hope in chocolate

WATER WORLD
Powerful aftershock hits quake-stricken Philippine city

Zimbabwe seeks aid after floods kill over 240 in 3 months

After year of calm, Mt Etna bursts into life

Water slowly restored in Chile capital after deadly floods

WATER WORLD
Mozambique truce extended by two months

11 Malian soldiers killed in attack on border base

Senegal and Gambia announce new era of ties

22 dead in DR Congo army clashes with M23 rebels

WATER WORLD
100,000-year-old human skulls from east Asia reveal complex mix of trends in time, space

Catalog of 208 human-caused minerals bolsters argument to declare 'Anthropocene Epoch'

Mothers dictate lifelong grooming habits in chimps

Tiny fibers open new windows into the brain




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement