Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .

New maps highlight habitat corridors in the tropics
by Staff Writers
Falmouth MA (SPX) Feb 05, 2014

File image.

A team of Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) scientists created maps of habitat corridors connecting protected areas in the tropics to incorporate biodiversity co-benefits into climate change mitigation strategies. Drs. Patrick Jantz, Scott Goetz, and Nadine Laporte describe their findings in an article entitled, "Carbon stock corridors to mitigate climate change and promote biodiversity in the tropics," available online in the journal Nature Climate Change on January 26.

Climate change and deforestation are changing tropical ecosystems, isolating organisms in protected areas that will change along with climate, threatening their survival. Nearly every animal and plant species requires travelling some distance for nutrition, reproduction and genetic diversity, but few conservation or climate mitigation strategies take the connections between conserved lands into account.

These habitat corridors are essential for longer-term biodiversity conservation, while also providing opportunities for climate change mitigation in the form of carbon sequestration and avoiding emissions from deforestation.

According to lead author Dr. Jantz, "Maintaining connectivity of forest ecosystems provides ecological and societal benefits ensuring long-term species survival and providing room for ecosystems to reorganize in response to climate change and protecting ecosystem services that people depend on." Co-author Dr. Goetz sees corridors as "avenues for migration of flora and fauna" needed for their survival "under the climate change we're already committed to."

The team used a high-resolution data set of vegetation carbon stock (VCS) to map 16,257 corridors through areas of the highest biomass between 5,600 protected areas in the tropics. For Dr. Jantz, "the VCS corridor approach informs global frameworks for land management based climate change mitigation by showing which forests contain significant carbon stocks and are important for tropical biodiversity."

Part of the study focused on the Legal Amazon, where the team used economic and biological information combining species richness and endemism with economic opportunity costs and deforestation threats to prioritize optimal corridors. For Dr. Goetz, "Conserving tropical forests ultimately requires prioritizing the services they provide to people in a local setting.

Identifying lands locally valuable for agriculture or other high-value uses, considering biodiversity and the threat of deforestation, our analysis provides both maps and a framework for realistic conservation planning."

Dr. Laporte adds, "Because it is unlikely all remaining tropical forests can be protected, the corridors defined by this study provide a way to prioritize lands in the context of the multiple benefits of tropical forest conservation."

According to Dr. Thomas E. Lovejoy, a Senior Fellow at the United Nations Foundation, "This represents a significant step towards the kind of integrated planning and management essential for sustainable development."

Jantz, P., S. Goetz, and N. Laporte. 2014. Carbon stock corridors to mitigate climate change and promote biodiversity in the tropics. Nature Climate Change. doi: 10.1038/NCLIMATE2105


Related Links
Woods Hole Research Center
Darwin Today At

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Single gene separates queen bee from workers
Detroit MI (SPX) Feb 05, 2014
A research team led by Wayne State University, in collaboration with Michigan State University, has identified a single gene in honeybees that separates the queens from the workers. The scientists unraveled the gene's inner workings and published the results in the current issue of Biology Letters. The gene, which is responsible for leg and wing development, plays a crucial role in the evo ... read more

Fire erupts at US nuclear waste plant

Repairs may mean darker hue for Rio's iconic Christ statue

Prisoners again bolt typhoon-damaged Philippine jail

One in 4 Japan tsunami children needs psychiatric care

Google mystery barge may be homeless

Microwires as mobile phone sensors

New NASA Laser Technology Reveals How Ice Measures Up

Chameleon of the sea reveals its secrets

Smithsonian reports fiery-red coral species discovered in the Peruvian Pacific

Can workshops on household water use impact consumer behavior?

World Bank still backs DR Congo Inga III hydro project

Weak El Nino possible by mid-2014: WMO

The storm before the calm

A 'smoking gun' on the Ice Age megafauna extinctions

Thinning of Arctic lake ice cuts winter ice season by 24 days

Disappearing snow increases risk of collapsing ice shelves in Antarctica

Herbicides may not be sole cause of declining plant diversity

Local foods offer tangible economic benefits in some regions

Are invasive plants a problem in Europe? Controversial views among invasion biologists

Beneficial insects, nematodes not harmed by genetically modified, insect-resistant crops

New Indonesian volcanic eruption halts search

New quake inflicts fresh damage on Greek island

Cut off by floods, British village becomes an island

Philippine typhoon survivors brace for new storm

'Do not disappoint', Nigeria's new top brass told

Vodacom sees surge in Africa mobile data usage

Head of Algeria ruling party attacks powerful intel chief

Zambia national park mining plan draws protests

Researchers discover how brain regions work together, or alone

Experiments show human brain uses one code for space, time, distance

Neanderthal lineages excavated from modern human genomes

When populations collide

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement