Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




ICE WORLD
New records for sea ice loss, greenhouse gas in 2012
by Staff Writers
Washington, District Of Columbia (AFP) Aug 06, 2013


The world lost record amounts of Arctic sea ice in 2012 and spewed out all-time high levels of greenhouse gases by burning fossil fuels, international climate scientists said Tuesday.

Last year was among the top 10 on record for global land and surface temperature since modern data collection began, said the State of the Climate report issued annually by researchers in Britain and the United States.

"The findings are striking," said Kathryn Sullivan, acting administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

"Our planet as a whole is becoming a warmer place," she told reporters.

The peer-reviewed report did not go into the causes for the trends but experts said it should serve as a guide for policymakers as they prepare for the effects of rising seas and warming weather on communities and infrastructure.

Furthermore, it points to a new normal in which record-setting events are typical, particularly in the Arctic, where surface temperature rise is fast outpacing the rest of the world.

"It's hard to read the report and not be led to the conclusion that the task of reducing carbon emissions is now more urgent than ever," said Michael Mann, a leading US climatologist at Pennsylvania State University who was not involved in the research.

Globally, according to four independent analyses cited by the study "2012 ranked as the eighth or ninth warmest year since records began in the mid-to-late 1800s.

"The year was 0.14C-0.17C above the 1981-2010 average, depending on the dataset considered," said the report published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

When it comes to Arctic sea ice, a new record low was observed in September and another all-time low for snow cover was recorded in the Northern Hemisphere, it said.

"Surface temperatures in the Arctic are increasing at a rate about two times faster than the rest of the world," said Jackie Richter-Menge, research civil engineer with the US Army Corps of Engineers.

"In the Arctic, the records or near records being reported from year to year are no longer anomalies or exceptions," she added.

"Really, they have become the rule for us, or the norm that we see in the Arctic and we expect to see for the foreseeable future."

The melt is also contributing to rising sea level. Average global sea level reached a record high in 2012, 1.4 inches (3.5 centimeters) above the 1993 to 2010 average.

"Most recently, over the past seven years or so, it appears that the ice melt is contributing more than twice as much to the global sea level rise compared with warming waters," said Jessica Blunden, climatologist at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center.

Meanwhile, permafrost temperatures reached record highs in northern Alaska and 97 percent of the Greenland ice sheet showed some form of melt, four times greater than the average melt for this time of year.

The amount of carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels also hit new highs, after a slight decline in recent years that followed the global financial crisis.

"In spring 2012, for the first time, the atmospheric CO2 concentration exceeded 400 parts per million at seven of the 13 Arctic observation sites," said the report.

Global average carbon dioxide reached 392.6 ppm, a 2.1 ppm increase from 2011, it said.

Droughts and unusual rains struck different parts of the globe last year, with "the worst drought in at least the past three decades for northeastern Brazil," it said.

"The Caribbean observed a very wet dry season and it was the Sahel's wettest rainy season in 50 years."

Sullivan said the findings "caution us, perhaps, to be looking at a likely future where extremes and intensity of some extremes are more frequent and more intense than what we have accounted for in the past."

On a positive note, the climate in Antarctica remained "relatively stable overall" and warm air led to the second smallest ozone hole in the past two decades, the report found.

.


Related Links
Beyond the Ice Age






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ICE WORLD
Ice-free Arctic winters could explain amplified warming during Pliocene
Boulder CO (SPX) Jul 31, 2013
Year-round ice-free conditions across the surface of the Arctic Ocean could explain why the Earth was substantially warmer during the Pliocene Epoch than it is today, despite similar concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, according to new research carried out at the University of Colorado Boulder. In early May, instruments at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii marked a new re ... read more


ICE WORLD
Dark tourism brings light to disaster zones

Papua New Guinea opposition challenges asylum deal

Sandy's offspring: baby boom nine months after storm

Malaysia says will get tough on illegal immigrants

ICE WORLD
Study: Home 3D printing may bring 'make it, don't buy it' to families

Watching catalysts at work - at the atomic scale

New Ways To Create Gradients For Molecular Interactions

Hardness in depth at nano scales

ICE WORLD
Sediment trapped behind dams makes for methane hot spots

Shrinking glaciers won't affect South Asia water availability: study

Veolia says profits down to a trickle, shares sparkle

Decoding material fluxes in the tropical ocean

ICE WORLD
New records for sea ice loss, greenhouse gas in 2012

Santa's workshop not flooded - but lots of melting in the Arctic

New knowledge about permafrost improving climate models

Ice-free Arctic winters could explain amplified warming during Pliocene

ICE WORLD
Fonterra CEO sorry for milk scare, denies cover-up

Team develops more accurate model of climate change impact on soil

New Zealand takes charge of Fonterra milk scare response

Roots breakthrough for drought-resistant rice

ICE WORLD
Henriette becomes hurricane but moves away from Mexico

Planned skyscrapers in Hollywood may have earthquake fault beneath

Pakistan warns of more rain after flood deaths hit 45

Study suggests Costa Rica volcano powered by 'highway from hell'

ICE WORLD
Mugabe wins landslide prompts opposition boycott

UN cuts back I. Coast force

Nigeria Islamists kill 20 civilians in north: military

Tunisia on brink of internal conflict after assassinations

ICE WORLD
Study: 'Adam' and 'Eve' lived in same time period

Hot flashes? Thank evolution

World's first IVF baby born after preimplantation genome sequencing is now 11 months old

First human tests of new biosensor that warns when athletes are about to 'hit the wall'




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement