Earth Science News  





. ORNL Resilience Plan To Help Tennessee, Mississippi And South Carolina Communities Beat Disaster

-
by Staff Writers
Oak Ridge TN (SPX) Oct 05, 2007
A new Oak Ridge National Laboratory initiative could help avert disasters in Tennessee, Mississippi and South Carolina and also lead to more information about climate change. The new Community and Regional Resilience Initiative (CARRI) will be implemented in Gulfport, Miss., Memphis, and Charleston, S.C., to increase "resilience" - the ability to prepare for, respond to and quickly recover from natural and man-made disasters - of the three communities.

These "partner communities" will help develop and share essential knowledge, best practices, tools and techniques to strengthen a community's ability to withstand a major disaster event with minimal downtime to basic government and business services, said CARRI director Warren Edwards.

"We will be seeking insights from the experiences of the Gulfport, Memphis and Charleston communities to construct what we are calling our 'resiliency toolbox,' " Edwards said. "We hope to identify what the partner communities need to be truly resilient; use that information to assess vulnerabilities in other communities; and work with them to help them close the gaps.

"A resilient community is prepared to help prevent or minimize the loss or damage to life, property and the environment and more quickly return citizens to work, reopen businesses, and restore essential services needed for a full and swift economic recovery."

Edwards said the three cities were approached about becoming the first communities for the project because they are susceptible to both natural and man-made disasters.

"Memphis is particularly vulnerable to earthquakes because of its proximity to the New Madrid fault line," Edwards said. "And, of course, Gulfport is currently in the process of recovering from Hurricane Katrina with a strong commitment to becoming an even more resilient community in the event of future storms. Charleston has significant hurricane and earthquake threats. Having made great strides in resilience planning, the city has lessons to share."

CARRI also may provide clues to potential community response to climate change. Tom Wilbanks, ORNL Corporate Fellow and research director for CARRI, said global warming could potentially affect world weather and precipitation patterns. Government leaders are beginning to look at climate change as a national security issue and examining its impacts on ecosystems and economies.

"While the immediate purpose of the study is to examine communities' resilience to storms, this work has definite implications for climate change and will give us a better understanding of how cities will respond to the expected shifts in temperature, weather patterns and environmental conditions we expect as a result," Wilbanks said.

Edwards said CARRI could help communities move beyond their reliance on government and first responders and draw on business, education, and civic resources to prepare, plan and respond as efficiently and quickly as possible in the event of a disaster. CARRI will have access to national and international researchers and practitioners who can augment the findings from the community activities with the best information and practices available.

"All of our partner communities are already doing some great work, so we look forward to working closely with key leaders in those communities to learn from what they are doing well, to help them locate and address any gaps, and to then formalize and develop some new best practices that can be shared and used by other communities."

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Running Shipwreck Simulations Backwards Helps Identify Dangerous Waves
Ann Arbor MI (SPX) Oct 05, 2007
Big waves in fierce storms have long been the focus of ship designers in simulations testing new vessels. But a new computer program and method of analysis by University of Michigan researchers makes it easy to see that a series of smaller waves---a situation much more likely to occur---could be just as dangerous. "Like the Edmund Fitzgerald that sank in Michigan in 1975, many of the casualties that happen occur in circumstances that aren't completely understood, and therefore they are difficult to design for," said Armin Troesch, professor of naval architecture and marine engineering.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • ORNL Resilience Plan To Help Tennessee, Mississippi And South Carolina Communities Beat Disaster
  • Running Shipwreck Simulations Backwards Helps Identify Dangerous Waves
  • China To Share Disaster Forecasting Information With Developing Countries
  • Pakistan turmoil won't slow quake recovery: army general

  • More droughts, floods for Australia as globe heats up
  • China offers surprise hope in climate change fight
  • Washington Climate Meeting Wraps Up As Bush Goes On Attack
  • Cave Records Provide Clues To Climate Change

  • Successful Image Taking By The High Definition Television
  • Boeing Launches WorldView-1 Earth-Imaging Satellite
  • New Faraway Sensors Warn Of Emerging Hurricane's Strength
  • Key Sensor For Northrop Grumman NPOESS Program Passes Critical Structural Test

  • Analysis: Nigeria wants militant back
  • New PowerSecure Subsidiary Helps Grocery Chains Reduce Energy Consumption
  • ING To Power All US Operations With Wind Power
  • Lomonosov Ridge Could Bring Russia 5 Billion Tons Of Extra Fuel

  • China denies cover-up of pig disease
  • China confirms bird flu outbreak: HK official
  • Northern Iraq battles cholera 'epidemic'
  • Expert says climate change will spread global disease

  • Living Fossils Heat Up For Reproduction
  • UF Researchers Devise Way To Calculate Rates Of Evolution
  • Rare Albino Ratfish Has Eerie Silvery Sheen
  • US plan to protect owl 'polluted by politics': lawmakers

  • US lawmaker warns of scary lead levels in Halloween items
  • Mountains of rubbish threaten Himalayan resort
  • China struggling to tackle rising pollution
  • Helping The Carbon Nanotube Industry Avoid Mega-Mistakes Of The Past

  • How Emotionally Charged Events Leave Their Mark On Memory
  • Walker's World: Get rich and shut up
  • Go East old man: Neanderthals reached China's doorstep
  • Why Quitting May Be Good For You

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement