Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
Ocean nutrients a key component of future change say scientists
by Staff Writers
Southampton UK (SPX) Apr 15, 2013


Oceanographic sampling equipment is shown being lowered into clear blue open ocean water. The clarity of the water is a consequence of low nutrient availability restricting the amount of planktonic microbes. Credit: Elizabeth Sargent, NOCS. Credit: Elizabeth Sargent, NOCS.

Variations in nutrient availability in the world's oceans could be a vital component of future environmental change, according to a multi-author review paper involving the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS).

The paper, published this month in Nature Geoscience, reviews what we know about ocean nutrient patterns and interactions, and how they might be influenced by future climate change and other man-made factors. The authors also highlight how nutrient cycles influence climate by fuelling biological production, hence keeping carbon dioxide (CO2) locked down in the ocean away from the atmosphere.

Dr Mark Moore from University of Southampton Ocean and Earth Science, which is based at NOCS, led the review. He said: "We aimed to get a group of international experts together in an attempt to define the current state of knowledge in this rapidly developing field."

Marine algae, which support most marine ecosystems, need certain resources to grow and reproduce - including nutrients. If there are not enough nutrients available, the growth or abundance of these microscopic plants can become restricted. This is known as 'nutrient limitation'.

"All organisms, from the smallest microbes, up to complex multi-cellular animals like us, require a variety of chemical elements to survive," explained Dr Moore. "Somehow we all have to get these elements from our external environment."

Nutrients are therefore a key driver of microbial activity in the oceans. But at the same time, microorganisms play a major role in cycling nutrients and carbon throughout the vast ocean system - including drawing down CO2 from the atmosphere. Therefore understanding ocean nutrient cycling is important for predicting future environmental change.

Dr Moore said: "Despite many decades of research, we still don't understand some of the complex interactions between marine microorganisms and nutrient cycles.

"Human activity has the potential to profoundly impact oceanic nutrient cycles. A solid understanding of complex feedbacks in the system will be required if we are going to be able to predict the consequences of these changes."

The authors - from 22 different institutes - call for an interdisciplinary approach merging new analytical techniques, observations and models going forward to address current gaps in our understanding.

The review resulted from a workshop, hosted at NOCS, as part of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme/Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (IGBP-SCOR) funded Fast Track Initiative on Upper Ocean Nutrient Limitation. C. M. Moore, M. M. Mills, K. R. Arrigo, I. Berman-Frank, L. Bopp, P. W. Boyd, E. D. Galbraith, R. J. Geider, C. Guieu, S. L. Jaccard, T. D. Jickells, J. La Roche, T. M. Lenton, N. M. Mahowald, E. Maranon, I. Marinov, J. K. Moore, T. Nakatsuka, A. Oschlies, M. A. Saito, T. F. Thingstad, A. Tsuda and O. Ulloa (2013) Processes and patterns of oceanic nutrient limitation. Nature Geoscience, published online 31 March 2013. DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1765

.


Related Links
National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (UK)
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Great White Sharks Scavenging On Dead Whales
Miami FL (SPX) Apr 15, 2013
Many terrestrial animals are frequently observed scavenging on other animals- whether it is a hyena stealing a lion kill in the Serengeti or a buzzard swooping down on a dead animal. However, documenting this sort of activity in the oceans is especially difficult, and often overlooked in marine food web studies. In a new study published in PLOS ONE titled, "White sharks (Carcharodon carcha ... read more


WATER WORLD
Fukushima leaking radioactive water

IAEA begins fresh probe into Japan's Fukushima

Fukushima plant springs another radioactive leak

Hong Kong ferry crash captains face manslaughter charges

WATER WORLD
High pressure gold nanocrystal structure revealed

Scientists design new adaptive material inspired by tears

UC Research Demonstrates Why Going Green Is Good Chemistry

Florida Tech professors present 'dark side of dark lightning' at conference

WATER WORLD
Spring rains bring life to Midwest granaries but foster Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone'

Ocean nutrients a key component of future change say scientists

Sea level rise: Jeopardy for terrestrial biodiversity on islands

Stanford seeks sea urchin's secret to surviving ocean acidification

WATER WORLD
Austria's glaciers shrank in 2012: study

New chart shows the entire topography of the Antarctic seafloor in detail

New Models Predict Dramatically Greener Arctic in the Coming Decades

Scientists predict arctic could be free of sea ice in summer by 2050

WATER WORLD
China media urge eating poultry despite bird flu

'Sustainable fish' label comes under fire

China media urge eating poultry despite bird flu

Limiting greenhouse gas emissions from land use in Europe

WATER WORLD
'Sandy' removed from hurricane name list

Indonesian floods kill eleven

Strong 6.3-magnitude quake hits western Japan

6.6-magnitude quake strikes Papua New Guinea: USGS

WATER WORLD
China invested $1.5bn in Algeria in a decade: envoy

Alleged drug lord seized, but Africa trade grows

Sudan defence minister sees 'end' to Darfur uprising

Obama takes first step to selling arms to Somalia

WATER WORLD
Pottery reveals Ice Age hunter-gatherers' taste for fish

Google adds 'digital estate planning' to its services

Better Understanding of Human Brain Supports National Security

Rare primate's vocal lip-smacks share features of human speech




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement