Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




ICE WORLD
Old aerial photos supply new knowledge on glaciers in Greenland
by Staff Writers
Copenhagen, denmark (SPX) Jun 04, 2012


"Most of the scientific foundation, models, and theories on glaciers in Greenland and how global warming affects them are based on observations from satellites over the last ten years. Otherwise scientists have had to use previous warming events way into the past when wanting to compare today's massive retreat."

The glaciers in southeast Greenland are retreating rapidly with the ongoing global climate change. But now research from the University of Copenhagen shows that the glaciers can recuperate within a short timeframe if temperatures are to drop.

The results are based on a collection of Danish aerial photos combined with both old and modern satellite imagery as well as field work. The scientific results have created international attention and have been published as a cover story in the highly esteemed journal Nature Geoscience.

"We have managed to get an overview of the glacial evolution over a period of 80 years. This is the first time ever this has been done in a study of glaciers in Greenland. Results show that glaciers can recuperate within a short time frame if climate changes and temperatures drop, as it has in a period after the 1940s," says PhD student and lead-author on the project Anders Bjork, from Professor Eske Willerslev's Centre for GeoGenetics from University of Copenhagen

Anders Bjork adds: "Most of the scientific foundation, models, and theories on glaciers in Greenland and how global warming affects them are based on observations from satellites over the last ten years. Otherwise scientists have had to use previous warming events way into the past when wanting to compare today's massive retreat."

A fight for land between Denmark and Norway
The Danish explorer Knud Rasmussen and his seventh Thule-expedition in 1932-33 is a significant cause for the recent publication from Anders Bjork and Dr. Kurt H. Kjaer from the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen.

Results have created international attention as Greenland stands as an important region for northern latitudes are affecting the rest of the earth's climate - including changes in glacial conditions and related sea-level rise.

Originally the many aerial photos, which have been achieved Danish National Survey and Cadastre, were used for producing new maps of the region in the early 1930s, as Denmark and Norway were fighting over the right of disposal of East Greenland, a fight without casualties which Denmark won at the International Court in Haag in the Netherlands in 1933.

Photos get a renaissanse
With help from the scientists and the Danish National Survey and Cadastre, the unique aerial photos have now gained a renaissance in a different setting where climate change and theories as "The Tipping Point" - where nature reaches a point where changes cannot be reversed are discussed.

"We have investigated no less than 132 glaciers on a 600 km coastal stretch in Southeast Greenland, both those who terminate on land and those who calve in the ocean.

The historical photos have proven to be extremely valuable, and with these photos and other aerial photos recorded later during WWII and satellite imagery we are able to observe glacier change in very long historical context.

In the early 1920s and 1930s, temperatures were high, similar to that of the present, and this affected the glacial melt. At the time many glaciers underwent a melt similar or even higher than what we have seen in the last ten years. When it became colder again in the 1950s and 1960s, glaciers actually started growing," says Dr. Kurt H. Kjaer and underlines:

"There should be no doubt that if the current temperature rise in Greenland continues then we will have problems with the melting of the glaciers. We are already seeing it now on the marine terminating glaciers where changes in temperature and ocean currents are influencing their stability. Another remarkable discovery we did was that the observed changes are not just local, it is happening in the entire region," says Dr. Kjaer.

Kurt H. Kjaer has previously worked with his colleague Svend Funder from Center for GeoGenetics on investigating sea ice extent in the Arctic Ocean. Results showed that the sea ice extent has been far from stable throughout the last 10,000 years.

Read the scientists' newly published paper in Nature GeoScience.

.


Related Links
University of Copenhagen
Beyond the Ice Age






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ICE WORLD
Discovery Of Historical Photos Sheds Light On Greenland Ice Loss
Columbus OH (SPX) Jun 01, 2012
A chance discovery of 80-year-old photo plates in a Danish basement is providing new insight into how Greenland glaciers are melting today. Researchers at the National Survey and Cadastre of Denmark - that country's federal agency responsible for surveys and mapping - had been storing the glass plates since explorer Knud Rasmussen's expedition to the southeast coast of Greenland in the early 193 ... read more


ICE WORLD
Lithuania launches regional nuclear safety watchdog

Italy's quake-struck north tries to reassure tourists

Ferrari auction to raise money for Italy quake

Sandia Labs technology used in Fukushima cleanup

ICE WORLD
Microsoft links Xbox with smartphones, tablets

E3 to showcase big videogame titles, hot trends

Windows 8 to dominate Taiwan computer show

Commonly used painkillers may protect against skin cancer

ICE WORLD
Great Barrier Reef heading for danger: UNESCO

Syrian refugees draining water-poor Jordan dry

Marine reserves provide baby bonus to fisheries

US backs EU plan to barter fishing rights

ICE WORLD
Peru needs glacier loss monitoring: dire UN warning

Greenland's current loss of ice mass

Old aerial photos supply new knowledge on glaciers in Greenland

Discovery Of Historical Photos Sheds Light On Greenland Ice Loss

ICE WORLD
France to ban Swiss pesticide as bee threat

Brazil farmers in legal feud with Monsanto over GM soy

Livestock industry beefs up Illinois economy

Time is ticking for some crop's wild relatives

ICE WORLD
Japan city watches 'premonitory' signs for tsunami

Three dead, six missing as typhoon passes Philippines

US officials urge hurricane preparation

Autopsy of an eruption: Linking crystal growth to volcano seismicity

ICE WORLD
Somali soldiers train for urban combat in rural Uganda

Sierra Leone's gruesome civil war

Mali deserters in Niger face uncertain future

Gambia detains G.Bissau ex-army chief, ousted minister

ICE WORLD
Handful of genetic changes led to huge changes to human brain

Family values

Suspicion resides in two regions of the brain

Personality genes may help account for longevity




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement