Earth Science News  





.
WATER WORLD
Oxygenation At A Depth Of 120 Meters Can Save The Baltic Sea

File image.
by Staff Writers
Gothenburg, Sweden (SPX) Apr 20, 2011
Oxygenation brings dead sea bottoms to life. This creates the necessary conditions for the establishment of new ecosystems that enable nature itself to deal with eutrophication. By conducting pilot studies in two fjords in Sweden, researchers at the University of Gothenburg have demonstrated that pumping oxygen-rich surface water down to sea bottoms is effective. A large wind-driven pump is now to be tested in open water in the Baltic.

"Today everyone is focused on reducing nutrient inputs to the sea in order to reduce eutrophication in the Baltic, but by helping nature itself to deal with the phosphorus that is discharged we can create a turbo effect in the battle against eutrophication," says Anders Stigebrandt, Professor Emeritus at the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg.

The idea of oxygenating dead sea bottoms comes from nature itself. The method of oxygenating the deep water in the Baltic can be compared to creating wetlands on land. Both methods are based on creating the conditions required for ecosystem services by establishing new ecosystems that can effectively bind the nutrients.

"If oxygen-free bottoms in the Baltic are oxygenated, it can be anticipated that every square kilometre of bottom surface will be able to bind 3 tonnes of phosphorus in a short time, which is a purely geochemical effect.

If the bottoms are then kept oxygenated for a prolonged period, fauna becomes established on and in the bottoms. This leads to the bottom sediments being oxygenated down to a depth of several centimetres, and the new ecosystem probably contributes to the possibility of further phosphorus being bound to the sediment."

The research project Baltic Deepwater Oxygenation, directed by Stigebrandt, is testing the hypothesis that prolonged oxygenation of the Baltic deep water results in long-term and increasing binding of phosphorus in bottom sediment. An important question to be answered is how the oxygenated deep-water areas can bind phosphorus in the longer term.

The answers are being sought through pilot studies in Byfjorden on the west coast and Kanholmsfjarden on the east coast, as well as in laboratory experiments. The project includes examining how the oxygenated bottoms are colonised and how this affects phosphorus uptake.

Stigebrandt is now planning a trial involving large-scale wind-driven pumping in the open water of the Baltic, in cooperation with Inocean AB, which is designing the pump on the basis of established technology from the off-shore industry.

The pump is contained in a 60 metres high and 100 metres deep tubular buoy which is anchored in an open location, in a deep basin yet to be decided off the east coast of Sweden. As a result of the buoy being given a small cross-sectional area at the water surface, the pump becomes non-sensitive to wave motions.

"The pump is to have capacity to pump 30 cubic metres of water per second, which is 15 times more than the pump in the Byfjord experiment. If this works, using a five times larger pump in a buoy around 120 metres deep should not pose major problems. This is the size we anticipate pumps needing to have in a future large-scale system for oxygenation of the Baltic deep water," says Stigebrandt.




Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
University of Gothenburg
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
WATER WORLD
How Do You Manage U.S. Oceans? Look At Local Successes
Providence RI (SPX) Apr 20, 2011
Policymakers are very familiar with land-use planning. But what is the best approach for planning uses of America's coastal waters and oceans? That question has gained importance since President Obama formed the National Ocean Council last summer and charged it with developing an ecosystem-based stewardship policy for the nation's oceans, coastal waters and the Great Lakes. A team of natur ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


WATER WORLD
Australia PM vows to back disaster-hit Japan

Japan PM declares no-go zone around nuclear plant

Germany's Munich Re issues profit warning on Japan quake

Japan to enforce evacuation zone around plant: report

WATER WORLD
Over 100,000 paid subscribers for NYTimes.com

Apple nearly doubles net profit, iPad sales dip

Don't stigmatise nuclear evacuees, says Japan govt

Robot readings in Japan nuke plant 'harsh'

WATER WORLD
Oxygenation At A Depth Of 120 Meters Can Save The Baltic Sea

NASA Specialists To Descend On Offutt

New count made of world's barrier islands

Fog 'harvesting' could mean water for poor

WATER WORLD
Melting ice on Arctic islands boosts sea levels: study

Arctic coastline eroding with warming

Arctic Coasts On The Retreat

West Antarctic Warming Triggered By Warmer Sea Surface In Tropical Pacific

WATER WORLD
Disease hits wheat crops in Africa, Mideast

Nationwide Study Finds US Meat And Poultry Is Widely Contaminated

Activists save Chinese dogs from cooking pot

Japan asks Brazil to ease food import rules

WATER WORLD
Report Cites "Liquefaction" As Key To Much Of Japanese Earthquake Damage

Floods force hundreds to evacuate in central Canada

DLR Publishes The Results Of Its Volcanic Ash Measurement Flights

Liquefaction major culprit in Japan quake

WATER WORLD
Burkina Faso president assumes defence post

Work on Sudan split continues

Chinese aid good for Africa: ministers

Military helicopter crashes in Darfur, five dead: army

WATER WORLD
Television Breakups Can Cause Some Viewers Distress And Lead To More Media Use

Music can keep brain sharp into old age

Missing The Gorilla

Human Rules May Determine Environmental Tipping Points


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement