Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



SHAKE AND BLOW
Preparations for a US west coast tsunami look to the past and future
by Staff Writers
San Francisco CA (SPX) Apr 26, 2016


This is the aftermath of a tsunami in Coquimbo, Chile following the 2015 Illapel earthquake. Image courtesy Carlos Ruiz. For a larger version of this image please go here.

After the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and devastating tsunami in Japan, states such as California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska are looking to both the past and the future to prepare for a tsunami on the U.S. Pacific coastline.

Plans for managing tsunami risk on the West Coast are evolving, said scientists speaking at the Seismological Society of America's (SSA) 2016 Annual Meeting, held April 20-22 in Reno, Nevada. These plans include everything from tsunami hazard maps that guide the development of personal and community evacuation routes to detailed "playbooks" that help harbor and port officials recommend specific action plans based on tsunami forecast data.

At the same time, geologists are searching for evidence of past tsunamis in the region to help them refine their estimates of tsunami risk. A SSA presentation by Robert Witter of the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Science Center, for instance, will discuss the evidence for frequent and large earthquakes and tsunamis occurring within the past 2000 years in parts of the Eastern Aleutian Islands.

There are signs that these earthquakes have spanned the boundary between the locked and creeping portions of the region's megathrust fault. Earthquakes in the area could cause significant tsunami effects across the Pacific, especially in Hawaii and California.

"Despite the fact that we have learned a significant amount about the earthquake sources for tsunamis, there are gaps in our understanding of past tsunamis, especially prehistoric tsunamis," says Rick Wilson, a senior engineering geologist with the California Geological Survey. "If we can demonstrate when and where tsunamis occurred in the past, that information will give us a better understanding of the return periods in these areas, and that can go into the probabilistic analyses that help us understand our hazard and risk better."

Wilson, who also serves as the science coordinator for the State of California Tsunami Preparedness and Hazard Mitigation Program, noted that more than 440,000 people have died worldwide since 1850 as a result of tsunamis. The deadly tsunamis caused by the 2004 Sumatran earthquake and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake brought increased public attention to tsunami science, warning and preparation.

At the SSA meeting, Wilson will discuss how California officials used state tsunami response playbooks to respond to a tsunami advisory issued after the September 2015 magnitude 8.3 Illapel earthquake in Chile. The playbooks were created after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, "when there was very little consistency between communities [in California] in what they did," Wilson says.

"Some evacuated their entire zone, some just evacuated their beaches." The new playbooks offer a variety of action plans depending on the size of the tsunami from a distant source, Wilson says, "which gives officials more tools at the local level so that they can make these decisions, so that it's not an all or nothing approach."

The impact of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami lingers in other ways in California. In her SSA presentation, geophysicist Lori Dengler of Humboldt State University will discuss how "Kamome," a Japanese boat caught in the 2011 tsunami that traveled across the ocean and beached near Crescent City, California in 2013, has become a powerful teaching tool in discussing earthquake and tsunami preparedness.

The future of tsunami response and preparedness might come from new technologies such as camera-bearing drones that send video messages of incoming waves to convince coastal dwellers to evacuate, says Masa Hayashi, a retired IBM engineer presenting at the SSA meeting.

And there's also the remote possibility that the trigger for a tsunami might not come from an earthquake, but from an asteroid strike on the Earth. In an SSA talk, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researcher Souheil Ezzedine will share data from a study that models the effects of an asteroid-generated tsunami (including the potential wave heights), on several coastline cities in the U.S., depending on the asteroid's impact off the U.S. East Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, and into the Pacific Ocean near San Francisco.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Seismological Society of America
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
SHAKE AND BLOW
Japanese map tracks the last moments of the victims of 2011 tsunami
Tokyo, Japan (SPX) Apr 18, 2016
The laboratory of Hidenori Watanave in the Faculty of System Design at Tokyo Metropolitan University and Iwate Nippo Co., Ltd have put together a digital archive tracking the evacuation patterns of Great East Japan Earthquake victims between the time the earthquake struck and the time the tsunami made landfall. It is exploring new possibilities in integrating digital technology with print media. ... read more


SHAKE AND BLOW
Nepal marks one year since quake as frustration mounts

A year on, millions of Nepal quake survivors wait for aid

A Chinese eye delivers new perspectives on Europe's migrant crisis

Nepal's quake-hit ghost village begins fragile recovery

SHAKE AND BLOW
Electrons slide through the hourglass on surface of bizarre material

Simple 3-D fabrication technique for bio-inspired hierarchical structures

Laser source for biosensors

Indian space scientists produce world's lightest synthetic material

SHAKE AND BLOW
EU moves to lift 15-month ban on Sri Lanka fish exports

Trees' internal water pipes predict which species survive drought

The health impacts of extreme weather in South Pacific

Salish shoreline armoring study shows cumulative effects on ecosystem

SHAKE AND BLOW
IceBridge Begins Eighth Year of Arctic Flights

Nansen gives birth to two icebergs

China spurs ships to use Arctic shipping route: report

Ice streams can be slowed down by gas hydrates

SHAKE AND BLOW
Top African producer bans GM cotton

Could global warming's top culprit help crops?

Phosphorus tax could be huge if tropical farming intensifies

The P tax cometh

SHAKE AND BLOW
Ecuador quake death toll jumps to 646, one week on

New aftershocks jolt Ecuador still reeling from quake

New quake rattles jittery Ecuador

Southern Africa drought triggers DR Congo food shortage

SHAKE AND BLOW
Climate change brings conflict, Senegal leader warns

Amnesty accuses Nigeria's military over deadly Shiite clashes

South Sudan's peace deal hangs by a thread

Burundi gunmen murder military officer: witness, army

SHAKE AND BLOW
Shining light on brain tumors

Researchers can identify you by your brain waves with 100 percent accuracy

Toward quieting the brain

Bigger brains led to bigger bodies in our ancestors




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement