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. Rand Says Further Study Warranted On Save The World Air Technology

According to the Save the World Air's website: "STWAs patented ZEFS and MKIV devices contain permanent rare-earth magnets which produce a strong magnetic field. As gasoline/diesel passes through the magnetic field, a molecular change in the fuel occurs facilitating a decline in both viscosity and surface tension. Reductions have been recorded in the scale from 760 microns down to 140 microns in carburetion fuel systems and as low as 3 microns in fuel injection systems. Consequently, the engine achieves a more efficient burn, better performance and a significantly lower production of HC, NOx and CO."
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) May 04, 2007
A RAND Corporation report says Save the World Air Inc. would need to conduct further laboratory studies and in-use testing to determine the effectiveness of its Zero Emission Fuel Saver (ZEFS) technology that is intended to reduce tailpipe pollutants and increase fuel efficiency in gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles.

"RAND's analysis of laboratory testing data provided by Save the World Air that deals with the performance of the ZEFS device installed in vehicles found at best mixed results from the tests and therefore could not confirm the effectiveness of the technology in actual use," said Michael Toman, director of the Environment Energy and Economic Development program at RAND, which carried out the study.

Save the World Air - based in North Hollywood, Calif. - says that the magnets in its ZEFS device change the viscosity of fuel when it passes through the magnetic field. Such a change would help increase fuel economy and reduce pollutants by improving the combustion of fuel, according to the company.

The RAND study said the existing technical literature does not contain credible reports that the application of magnetic fields to either gasoline or diesel fuel oil will reduce the viscosities of these automotive fuels.

The market potential for the Save the World Air ZEFS device will depend both on demonstrating positive results from the technology and competition posed by other competing technologies, according the report by RAND, a nonprofit research organization.

RAND was hired in 2002 to assist Save the World Air in developing a plan to assess the technical basis for its ZEFS device and understand the potential market for the device if a technical basis were established.

RAND outlined a research and evaluation program for Save the World Air to examine the theoretical basis of the ZEFS device and to test the impact of the device when installed on vehicles.

Researchers at Temple University, who were funded by Save the World Air as a result of a competitive grants process administered by RAND, have reported findings indicating a potential connection between magnetic fields and fuel viscosity. However, that laboratory work has not yet been independently reviewed and published by the Temple University research team, and it does not settle the issue of how magnetic fields might affect actual engine performance.

RAND researchers did not review additional 2007 tests conducted on motorcycles by a California laboratory for Save the World Air after RAND's work was completed.

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Related Links
RAND Corporation
Save the World Air Inc.
The Air We Breathe at TerraDaily.com

Noxious Lightning
Huntsville Al (SPX) Apr 29, 2007
Lightning is more than light and noise: It's an intense chemical factory that affects both local air quality and global climate. But how big is the effect? Researchers aren't sure. To answer the question they're developing a new technique to estimate the factory's output. If successful, the method will be applied to the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) that will monitor the Western hemisphere from a next-generation weather satellite slated for launch in 2014.

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