Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



SHAKE AND BLOW
Rescuers scramble for survivors after deadly quake hits Japan
by Staff Writers
Mashiki, Japan (AFP) April 15, 2016


Rescuers were rifling through the remains of collapsed buildings in southern Japan on Friday, after a powerful earthquake left at least nine people dead and injured hundreds, sparking fires and buckling roads.

Tens of thousands of people fled their homes after the 6.5-magnitude quake struck the southwestern island of Kyushu on Thursday night, leaving lumps of broken concrete strewn in the streets.

Houses collapsed, factories stopped work and a high-speed train was de-railed, while the roof of the treasured Kumamoto castle in the southern city of the same name was also damaged.

"There was a ka-boom and the whole house shook violently sideways," Takahiko Morita, a resident of nearby town Mashiki, said in a telephone interview with public broadcaster NHK.

"Furniture and bookshelves fell down, and books were all over the floor."

Dozens of aftershocks followed the quake, which hit about 9:26 pm (1226 GMT) on Thursday evening, and officials warned the death toll could rise as rescuers scoured the collapsed structures.

As rescue workers toiled through the night, an eight-month-old baby girl was pulled from the rubble alive and unharmed, NHK reported.

"As far as we can tell from infrared images from a police helicopter, there appears to be a significant number of houses destroyed or half-collapsed," said disaster minister Taro Kono.

"There are fears the number of injured could rise."

Rescuers are concentrating their searches in Mashiki, a town near the epicentre of the quake where the most deaths have been recorded.

On the streets, the remains of collapsed Japanese-style houses -- many of then aged, wooden structures -- could be seen, and damaged roof tiles lay in piles.

Scores of people spent the night huddled in front of the town hall, some in tears, while others wrapped themselves in blankets to ward off the nighttime chill.

"I'm so scared of the aftershocks that I cannot sleep," 94-year-old Tomiko Takahashi told Jiji Press.

- Nuclear plants safe -

By Friday morning, the government said it had confirmed at least 860 people had been injured, at least 53 seriously. An official from the local Kumamoto disaster agency said at least nine were dead.

"We are combing through Mashiki where the damage was serious to see if there are any people who are still seeking rescue," said government spokesman Yoshihide Suga.

Gen Aoki, a Japan Meteorological Agency seismologist, urged residents to be on guard for more aftershocks and warned rain in coming days could make the situation worse.

"Please do not go near damaged houses and structures that are about to collapse," he said at an early morning briefing.

About 57,000 households in Kumamoto prefecture have been left without water, according to local government figures.

Nuclear plants in the region were unaffected, but several major manufacturers including Honda, Bridgestone, and Sony said they had suspended operations at factories in the area.

Train services on Kyushu were temporarily halted after Thursday's earthquake and a super fast bullet train derailed -- luckily while it was empty -- said Yusuke Nanri, a spokesman for operator JR Kyushu.

Some 1,600 military personnel were joined by nearly 2,000 police officers and more than 1,300 firefighters to help in the search and rescue efforts, Suga said early Friday.

The initial quake, which struck at a shallow depth of 10 kilometres (6.2 miles), was followed two and a half hours later by another measuring 6.4 magnitude, according to Japan's meteorological agency. The US Geological Survey measured it a smaller 6.2 magnitude.

In total, more than 100 earthquakes rocked the region after the first hit, and officials warned the could continue for a week or so.

Japan's two sole operating nuclear reactors, located on Kyushu, were functioning normally, an official at the Sendai plant told AFP.

Japan, one of the most seismically active countries in the world, has been particularly on edge over the vulnerability of nuclear power plants after a massive undersea quake on March 11, 2011, that sent a tsunami barrelling into the country's northeast coast.

Some 18,500 people were left dead or missing, and several nuclear reactors went into meltdown at the Fukushima plant in the worst atomic accident in a generation.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
SHAKE AND BLOW
Magnitude 6.9 quake hits northern Myanmar
Yangon (AFP) April 13, 2016
Myanmar was struck by a magnitude 6.9 quake on Wednesday, the US Geological Survey reported, with tremors felt around the region, including in neighbouring India and China. The quake, which was 134 kilometres (214 miles) deep, hit some 396 kilometres north northwest of the capital Naypyidaw, according to the USGS. Much of Myanmar's outlying provinces have poor communications infrastruct ... read more


SHAKE AND BLOW
Bringing the landslide laboratory to remote regions

Crane collapse kills 18 in southern China: state media

Pakistan ends search for 23 people trapped by landslide

Czechs scrap programme to resettle Iraqi Christians

SHAKE AND BLOW
Radical solution could avoid depletion of natural resources

Graphene is both transparent and opaque to radiation

Breaking metamaterial symmetry with reflected light

Catalyst could make production of key chemical more eco-friendly

SHAKE AND BLOW
Video captures swarming red crabs

Will raindrops stick to a spider web's threads?

Nicaragua lawmakers dismiss attempt to block canal project

Monsoon forecast offers cheer to India's farmers

SHAKE AND BLOW
Hungry penguins chase Antarctic's shifting krill

Six to 10 million years ago: Ice-free summers at the North Pole

Summer melt-driven streams on Greenland's ice sheet brought into focus

New cause of exceptional Greenland melt revealed

SHAKE AND BLOW
Pinpointing the effects of fertilizer

EU parliament urges limited approval for weedkiller

Fertilizer's legacy: Taking a toll on land and water

AccorHotels to plant gardens, cut food waste

SHAKE AND BLOW
Magnitude 6.9 quake hits northern Myanmar

Traffic chaos, schools shut as Riyadh hit by rare flooding

Death toll from South Asian quake rises to 6: officials

Powerful quake rocks South Asia, one dead

SHAKE AND BLOW
Two Somalia drone strikes kill about 12 militants: US

Taiwan says Kenya police broke down jail walls to forcibly deport Taiwanese

Djibouti's Guelleh re-elected with landslide win

Primate populations suffer as a result of Congolese warfare

SHAKE AND BLOW
The pyrophilic primate

Headdress study highlights ancient hunter-gatherer rituals

Humans likely delivered diseases to Neanderthals

Primate evolution in the fast lane




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement