Earth Science News  





. Research Reveals Hidden Magnetism In Superconductivity

File photo: Testing magnets.
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Feb 06, 2006
While studying a compound made of the elements cerium- rhodium-indium, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered that a magnetic state can coexist with superconductivity in a specific temperature and pressure range.

The discovery is a step toward a deeper understanding of how Nature is organized in regimes ranging from the fabric of the cosmos to the most fundamental components of elementary particles.

In research published recently in the scientific journal Nature, Los Alamos scientists Tuson Park, Joe D. Thompson, and their colleagues describe the discovery of hidden magnetism in the CeRhIn5 compound.

In studying the compound, researchers found that a purely unconventional superconducting phase is separated from a phase of coexisting magnetism and unconventional superconductivity, with the boundary between these two phases controlled by the laws of quantum physics.

Unconventional superconductors are materials that exhibit superconductivity, a complete absence of electrical resistance under cold temperatures, but use exotic mechanisms.

Conventional wisdom has long held that the magnetism is excluded as materials change phases, but the researchers now show that it is merely hidden by unconventional superconductivity and can be made to reappear in the presence of an applied magnetic field.

According to Thompson, "this discovery provides an exciting opportunity to better understand how magnetism and unconventional superconductivity are related in more-complex materials and may reveal more about the technologically important field of high temperature superconductors."

At low temperatures, electrons in a metal can pair with each other to create superconductivity, align in a magnetically ordered state, or do neither. Until recently, these mutually exclusive options for electrons were the norm, but the discovery of complex electronic materials like CeRhIn5, which can sustain more exotic forms of superconductivity, now shows that electrons can participate simultaneously in magnetism and superconductivity.

In addition to Park and Thompson, the research team included Filip Ronning, Roman Movshovich, and John Sarrao from Los Alamos, along with Huiqiu Yuan and Myron Salamon, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Related Links
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Worlds Poor Can Have Energy Without More Global Warming
Washington (AFP) Mar 06, 2006
Meeting the desperate need for energy of the world's poorest countries does not have to contribute to global warming, experts said Monday at a conference sponsored by the World Bank. In a speech to the conference, Bank president Paul Wolfowitz bemoaned the fact that "1.6 billion people still have no access to the electricity grid".

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Agami Systems Eases Access Critical Disaster-Relief Imagery in Near Real-Time
  • Study Finds Californians Unmotivated To Prepare For Next Disaster
  • The Future Of Foreign Assistance
  • High Post-Hurricane Rents Push People Out Of New Orleans

  • WFP Warns Of "Large Scale" Deaths In Kenyan Drought Crisis
  • IODP Scientists Acquire 'Treasure Trove' Of Climate Records Off Tahiti Coast
  • Massive Ancient Flood Linked To Climate Change
  • Fossil Wood Gives Vital Clues To Ancient Climates

  • International Symposium On Radar Altimetry To Meet In Venice
  • Satellites Ensure Safe Passage Through Treacherous Waters In Ocean Race
  • ESA Satellite Program Monitors Dangerous Ocean Eddies
  • Envisat Marks Fours Year In ESA Mission To Planet Earth

  • World's Poor Can Have Energy Without More Global Warming
  • New Techs, Ideas Can Help In Bid Counter Global Warming
  • Research Reveals Hidden Magnetism In Superconductivity
  • Researchers Find Ways Heat-Loving Microbes Release Energy

  • Crippling Indian Ocean Epidemic Detected in France
  • People of African Descent More Vulnerable to TB
  • Americans Downplay Widespread Outbreak Of Avian Flu In Next Year
  • Learning To Love Bacteria

  • Threat To Last Stronghold Of Endangered Turtle
  • Bats Have Complex Skills To Deal With "Clutter"
  • Plants Eavesdrop For Their Own Protection
  • Smallest Triceratops Skull Described

  • Particlates Increase Hospital Admissions For Cardiovascular Disease
  • Manila's Garbage Dump Offers Lifeline For Poor
  • Pesticides In The Nation's Streams And Ground Water
  • Czechs, Slovaks Agree To Cooperate Against German Waste Dumping

  • Humans Are Still Evolving
  • Magdalenian Girl Has Oldest Recorded Case Of Impacted Wisdom Teeth
  • World's Oldest Ship Timbers Found In Egyptian Desert
  • Archaeologists To Establish True Value Of Roman Silver Coins

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement