Earth Science News  





. Researchers Propose New Molecule To Explain Circadian Clock

A graphic representation of the molecular interactions of circadian rhythm, based on work recently published by Cornell researchers. They proposed that a new, unknown molecule, called the focus-binding mediator (FBM) would need to be inserted into the cycle along with proteins period and timeless, in order for mathematical modeling of the system to make sense.
By Anne Ju
Cornell NJ (SPX) Sep 04, 2007
The internal clock in living beings that regulates sleeping and waking patterns -- usually called the circadian clock -- has often befuddled scientists due to its mysterious time delays. Molecular interactions that regulate the circadian clock happen within milliseconds, yet the body clock resets about every 24 hours. What, then, stretches the expression of the clock over such a relatively long period? Cornell researchers have contributed to the answer, thanks to new mathematical models recently published.

In the August online edition of Public Library of Science (PLOS) Computational Biology, Cornell biomolecular engineer Kelvin Lee, in collaboration with graduate student Robert S. Kuczenski, Kevin C. Hong '05 and Jordi Garcia-Ojalvo of Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Spain, hypothesize that the accepted model of circadian rhythmicity may be missing a key link, based on a mathematical model of what happens during the sleeping/waking cycle in fruit flies.

"We didn't discover any new proteins or genes," Lee said. "We took all the existing knowledge, and we tried to organize it."

Using mathematical models initially created by Hong, who has since graduated, the team set out to map the molecular interactions of proteins called period and timeless -- widely known to be related to the circadian clock.

The group hypothesized that an extra, unknown protein would need to be inserted into the cycle with period and timeless, a molecule that Kuczenski named the focus-binding mediator, in order for the cycle to stretch to 24 hours.

Lee said many scientists are interested in studying the circadian clock, and not just to understand such concepts as jet lag -- fatigue induced by traveling across time zones. Understanding the body's biological cycle might, for example, lead to better timing of delivering chemotherapy, when the body would be most receptive, Lee said.

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
All About Human Beings and How We Got To Be Here




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
How Much Will You Pay To Live Near People Like You
Durham NC (SPX) Sep 05, 2007
Using restricted-access Census data, a new study examines a quarter-million households on a block-by-block basis to yield new results about the correlation between household attributes and school quality. The researchers find that, conditional on income, households prefer to self-segregate on the basis of both race and education.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Japan holds disaster drills to prepare for big quake
  • Devastated New Orleans mourns Katrina dead two years on
  • NKorea searches for fugitives after floods: aid group
  • Death toll mounts as floods, heat wave batter US

  • UN conference highlights Spain's threat from desertification
  • Half-price Big Mac to fight global warming proves big hit in Japan
  • Desertification is creeping up on world agriculture: UN agency
  • NASA Study Predicts More Severe Storms With Global Warming

  • NASA Scientist Treks To Burning Man Festival
  • European Hot Spots And Fires Identified From Space
  • China Develops Beidou Satellite Monitoring System
  • DigitalGlobe Announces Launch Date For WorldView-1

  • Analysis: Oil, security for Iraq investors
  • Australia And China Partner For A Low-Emission Energy Future
  • Grain Will Not Become Oil
  • Analysis: Iraq oil law (still) coming soon

  • Researchers Discover New Strategies For Antibiotic Resistance
  • Yale Scientists Use Nanotechnology To Fight E. Coli
  • Pig disease spreads through China
  • Discovery Could Help Stop Malaria At Its Source - The Mosquito

  • Switching Goals
  • When Bivalves Ruled The World
  • First Orchid Fossil Puts Showy Blooms At Some 80 Million Years Old
  • Bioengineers Devise Nanoscale System To Measure Cellular Forces

  • MIT Unraveling Secrets Of Red Tide
  • Malaysia culls 50,000 pigs over smell, pollution
  • Boffins in Ireland claim chewing gum breakthrough
  • Biosensors To Probe The Metals Menace

  • Researchers Propose New Molecule To Explain Circadian Clock
  • How Much Will You Pay To Live Near People Like You
  • Not All Risk Is Created Equal
  • Area Responsible For Self-Control Found In The Human Brain

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement