Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Earth Science News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



WATER WORLD
Inland waterways emit more CO2 than previously thought
by Staff Writers
Pullman WA (SPX) May 26, 2016


Solar-powered device takes measurements over Mississippi's Ross Barnett Reservoir. Image courtesy Washington State University. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Washington State University researchers have found that greenhouse-gas emissions from lakes and inland waterways may be as much as 45 percent greater than previously thought. Their study, published in Environmental Research Letters, has implications for the global carbon budget and suggests that terrestrial ecosystems may not be as good a carbon reservoir as scientists thought.

Similar to the way people use a budget to manage finances, researchers are working to understand where carbon is being spent and saved on a global scale to better manage resources. The scientists know that humans are emitting about 33 billion tons of carbon dioxide per year into the atmosphere globally and that the emissions are changing the climate. About half of the emissions stay in the atmosphere, but researchers are unable to quantify with certainty how much carbon is taken up by land and oceans.

"People can't figure out how to close the budget with great confidence,'' said Heping Liu, associate professor in the WSU Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. "That's the big mystery.''

A significant part of the carbon dioxide initially sequestered by terrestrial ecosystems moves into inland waters and is then released to the atmosphere. Scientists previously have made only occasional measurements of emissions from waterways - most often during calm, daytime conditions - and have used these measurements to make broad estimates for waterways' contribution to regional or global emissions. They missed nighttime emissions and periods between field samplings.

In the study, the WSU team took a yearlong series of continuous measurements of carbon dioxide emissions, gathering data from atmospheric instruments on a platform over the water in Mississippi's Ross Barnett Reservoir. The researchers used a sophisticated system that measures atmospheric eddies, called an eddy covariance system. It was powered by solar panels and batteries.

The WSU team found that nighttime carbon emissions were as much as 70 percent higher than during the day and that storms also created emissions spikes.

"That's pretty huge,'' said Liu. "Based on this study, the emissions from inland waterways are much larger than previously thought.''

The researchers surmise that during the day, when air temperatures are warm, water layers in the reservoir are stratified and carbon dioxide from microbes in the lake bottom cannot escape. Colder nighttime temperatures allow for mixing of the water and for higher emission rates. Wind from storms also creates mixing and an opportunity for carbon dioxide to escape.

Liu and his colleagues believe that the Mississippi reservoir is not unusual and that the higher emission rates apply to waterways around the world. Other researchers have seen similar higher nighttime emissions, but had not connected the measurements to a higher overall emissions rate in the global carbon budget.

Research paper: In addition to WSU, the research group includes scientists from Duke University, the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, and University of California, Santa Barbara.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Washington State University
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
WATER WORLD
California eases water restrictions, but drought continues
Los Angeles (AFP) May 19, 2016
California has loosened emergency restrictions on water conservation after El Nino-driven storms boosted reservoir levels this winter in parts of the state, authorities announced. The State Water Resources Control Board voted unanimously on Wednesday to roll back strict conservation rules and to allow local communities to set their own savings targets based on water supply. That means th ... read more


WATER WORLD
12 dead in Myanmar jade mine landslide, many feared missing

In first, Russia, China emergency medical teams get global certificate

The Lessons of Chernobyl and Fukushima

MH370 kin 'gravely concerned' at impending end of search

WATER WORLD
How the giant magnetoelectric effect occurs in bismuth ferrite

Rice de-icer gains anti-icing properties

Combining nanotextures with Leidenfrost effect for water repellency

Precise measurements on earth ensure NASA's spacecraft work in space

WATER WORLD
In changing oceans, cephalopods are booming

Squids on the rise as oceans change

South Africa detains 3 Chinese fishing vessels, 100 crew

New model could predict sudden shifts in river deltas

WATER WORLD
Study Helps Explain Sea Ice Differences at Earth's Poles

A history of snowfall on Greenland, hidden in ancient leaf waxes

Virginia Tech researchers in the Antarctic discover new facets of space weather

Evidence of repeated rapid retreat of the East Antarctic ice sheet

WATER WORLD
New confidence in China wine market at Hong Kong's Vinexpo

Cambodia's royal oxen predict 'bountiful' harvest despite severe drought

A peachy defense system for seeds

Bayer-Monsanto tie-up fuels anti-GM debate in Germany

WATER WORLD
Villages in ashes after deadly Indonesia volcano eruption

Sri Lanka rain death toll hits 101 as waters recede

Thousands homeless in cyclone-hit Bangladesh

Flood-hit Sri Lankans face uncertain future

WATER WORLD
DR Congo denies getting pistols from North Korea

Senegal's child beggars show limits of 'apptivism'

S.Africa may re-consider regulated rhino horn trade in future

Climate-exodus expected in the Middle East and North Africa

WATER WORLD
Global data shows inverse relationship, shift in human use of fire

Did human-like intelligence evolve to care for helpless babies

Ancient Chinese pottery reveals 5,000-yr-old beer brew

Great apes communicate cooperatively, like humans




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement