. Earth Science News .

Seismic waves converted to audio to study quake's traits
by Staff Writers
Atlanta, GA (SPX) Mar 12, 2012

File image courtesy AFP.

Last year's 9.0-magnitude Tohoku-Oki, Japan, earthquake was the fourth largest since 1900. However, because of thousands of seismometers in the region and Japan's willingness to share their measurements with the rest of the world, the Tohoku-Oki quake is the best-recorded earthquake of all-time.

This plethora of information is allowing scientists to share their findings in unique ways. Zhigang Peng, associate professor in Georgia Tech's School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, has converted the earthquake's seismic waves into audio files. The results allow experts and general audiences to "hear" what the quake sounded like as it moved through the earth and around the globe.

"We're able to bring earthquake data to life by combining seismic auditory and visual information," said Peng, whose research appears in the March/April edition of Seismological Research Letters. "People are able to hear pitch and amplitude changes while watching seismic frequency changes. Audiences can relate the earthquake signals to familiar sounds such as thunder, popcorn popping and fireworks."

The different sounds can help explain various aspects of the earthquake sequence, including the mainshock and nearby aftershocks. For example, this measurement was taken near the coastline of Japan between Fukushima (the nuclear reactor site) and Tokyo.

The initial blast of sound is the 9.0 mainshock. As the earth's plates slipped dozens of meters into new positions, aftershocks occured. They are indicated by "pop" noises immediately following the mainshock sound. These plate adjustments will likely continue for years.

As the waves from the earthquake moved through the earth, they also triggered new earthquakes thousands of miles away. In this example, taken from measurements in California, the quake created subtle movements deep in the San Andreas Fault.

The initial noise, which sounds like distant thunder, corresponds with the Japanese mainshock. Afterwards, a continuous high-pitch sound, similar to rainfall that turns on and off, represents induced tremor activity at the fault.

This animation not only help scientists explain the concept of distant triggering to general audiences, but also provides a useful tool for researchers to better identify and understand such seismic signals in other regions.

The human ear is able to hear sounds for frequencies between 20 Hz and 20 kHz, a range on the high end for earthquake signals recorded by seismometers.

Peng, graduate student Chastity Aiken and other collaborators in the U.S. and Japan simply played the data faster than true speed to increase the frequency to audible levels. The process also allows audiences to hear data recorded over minutes or hours in a matter of seconds.

The research is published in the March/April edition of Seismological Research Letters.

Related Links
Japan Earthquake at Georgia Tech
School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries


. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Quake researchers warn of Tokyo's 'Big One'
Tokyo (AFP) March 8, 2012
A year on from one of the biggest earthquakes in recorded history, Japanese scientists are warning anew that Tokyo could soon be hit by a quake that will kill thousands and cause untold damage. Greater Tokyo, home to 35 million tightly packed people, has seen a three-fold increase in tectonic activity since the magnitude 9.0 undersea quake that unleashed a killer tsunami last March. Ever ... read more

Japan's nuclear disaster: a timeline

Japan strives to win back tourists

Meltdown intel emerges ahead of Japan anniversary

Nothing stirs in Japan's nuclear ghost town

Garafolo tests spacecraft seal to verify computer models

Andrews Space Contracted to Deliver 100 Series Command and Data Handling System for GEO Application

Astrium wins Helios through life support contract extension

Researchers 'Print' Polymers That Bend Into 3-D Shapes

Seychelles' idyllic habitat at risk from climate change

Water crunch looms without action on waste: UN report

UN scientists warn of increased groundwater demands due to climate change

Time to tackle water crisis, global forum told

NASA Finds Thickest Parts of Arctic Ice Cap Melting Faster

Greenland icesheet more vulnerable than thought to warming

Dust linked to increased glacier melting and ocean productivity

Moon to blame for sinking of Titanic?

Spanish farmers struggle with lack of rain

Salt-loving wheat could help ease food crisis

Belgian racing pigeons lure rich Chinese aficionados

13 million people threatened by food crisis: Oxfam

Seismic waves converted to audio to study quake's traits

Japan marks anniversary of tsunami tragedy

Volcanoes deliver two flavors of water

Australia flood bill mounts and more rain forecast

Bloodhounds deployed to fight elephant poaching in DR Congo

AU troops to replace Ethopian forces in key Somali cities

Former Ugandan child soldier backs viral video

Mali rebels strike amid post-Libya anarchy

First Evidence of Hunting by Prehistoric Ohioans

Lockheed Martin and ZyGEM To Offer Rapid DNA Analysis Platform for Human Identity Testing

Scientists search for source of creativity

Bosnian fights to save 'bear children', Laka and Gvido

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement