Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Earth Science News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















WATER WORLD
Shallow-water corals are not related to their deep-water counterparts
by Staff Writers
Miami FL (SPX) Mar 07, 2016


This image shows a Porites astreoides colony at 6 m depth in St. Croix, USVI. Image courtesy Tyler Smith, Ph.D. For a larger version of this image please go here.

A new study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that shallow-reef corals are more closely related to their shallow-water counterparts over a thousand miles away than they are to deep-water corals on the same reef.

The researchers studied the genetic connectivity of a common Caribbean coral species, the mustard hill coral Porites astreoides, at sites in Florida - in the Upper Keys, Lower Keys and Dry Tortugas - and in Bermuda and the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) to understand if reefs in shallow water might be able to recover from disturbances by recruiting new coral larvae from deeper, more intact populations of corals.

Corals at these sites, and throughout the Caribbean, are in decline due to a variety of local and global stressors, including climate change, disease, pollution, and overfishing.

They found that coral colonies on reefs less than 35-feet (10-meters) deep in the Florida Keys were more closely related to corals at the same depths in the USVI, over a thousand miles away. They also found that corals of the same species found at depths greater than 80 feet (25 meters) in the Florida Keys were very different from their shallow-water neighbors, despite their close proximity.

"These results are interesting because they are the opposite of what we might expect," said study lead author Xaymara Serrano, a postdoctoral researcher at the UM-based Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (CIMAS) and UM alumna.

"We had expected nearby deep corals to be closely related to their shallow water counterparts, but instead we found that this is generally not the case in Florida."

The findings showed that most shallow corals across the region were very closely related to each other, indicating that they were well-connected and shared larvae. The exception was Bermuda, whose shallow corals formed a separate population, which, according to the researchers, reflects its isolated location in the western Atlantic.

In the Florida Keys, deeper corals formed a separate genetic population that was distinct from the shallow corals of Florida, the USVI and Bermuda.

Results from the study agree with earlier findings, published by the same team in 2014 for another widespread coral species, the great star coral Montastraea cavernosa, despite the fact that two coral species reproduce in different ways.

The researchers also noted that the deep-shallow differences did not exist in Bermuda, and were not as strong in the USVI, suggesting that differences in local current patterns and water clarity might be driving the isolation of Florida's deeper corals.

"This study highlights the need to do all we can to protect shallow water corals in the Florida Keys," said study co-author Andrew Baker, UM Rosenstiel School associate professor of marine biology and ecology. "We can't rely on deeper reefs to help out our shallow reefs in this time of crisis."

The study, titled "Long distance dispersal and vertical gene flow in the Caribbean brooding coral Porites astreoides" was published in the Feb. 22 issue of the Nature Publishing Group journal Scientific Reports. The study's authors include: Xaymara Serrano and Andrew Baker from the UM Rosenstiel School, Iliana Baums from Pennsylvania State University, Tyler Smith from the University of Virgin Islands, Ross Jones from the Australian Institute of Marine Science, and Tonya Shearer from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

.


Related Links
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
WATER WORLD
The overlooked commotion of particle motion in the ocean
Exeter UK (SPX) Mar 02, 2016
Most aquatic species sense sound via particle motion, yet few studies on underwater acoustic ecology have included measurements of particle motion. In response, researchers from the Universities of Exeter, Bristol and Leiden and CEFAS have developed a user-friendly introduction to particle motion, explaining how and when it ought to be measured, and provide open-access analytical tools to ... read more


WATER WORLD
NATO commander says Russia, Syria using migrant crisis as weapon

Quake-hit Nepal hands out free SIM cards to tourists

No go-ahead from Turkey on NATO mission in Aegean: diplomats

Former TEPCO bosses indicted over Fukushima disaster

WATER WORLD
University of Kentucky physicist discovers new 2-D material that could upstage graphene

UMass Amherst team offers new, simpler law of complex wrinkle patterns

Disney automated system lets characters leap and bound realistically in virtual worlds

Bone research could yield stronger synthetic materials

WATER WORLD
An integrated evaluation framework for water storage strategies in Sub-Sahara Africa

New research helps solve the riddle of the ocean carbon conundrum

The overlooked commotion of particle motion in the ocean

Coastal aquifers better than seawater as source for desalination

WATER WORLD
Australian icebreaker heading home after Antarctica grounding

Australian icebreaker refloated in Antarctica after grounding

OGC requests information to guide Arctic Spatial Data Pilot

Australian icebreaker runs aground in Antarctica

WATER WORLD
Climate change poised to hurt food supplies: study

NGOs sue Monsanto, EU food safety watchdog over pesticide

Recoupling crops and livestock offers energy savings to dairy farmers

University of Guam scientist and colleagues tag coconut rhinoceros beetles

WATER WORLD
Guatemala on alert as volcano spews ash over vast area

How to make a tiny volcanic island

Indonesian tsunami warning buoys not working when quake hit

Powerful quake in western in Indonesia sparks panic

WATER WORLD
Rwanda prosecutors demand 22 years in jail in sedition trial

S.African private army protects world's largest rhino farm

US top brass urge tighter W. Africa response to Islamist threat

Kenyan cops busted with illegal ivory

WATER WORLD
ONR Global sponsors research to improve memory through electricity

Easter Island not destroyed by war, analysis of 'spear points' shows

Neanderthals and modern H. sapiens crossbred over 100,000 years ago

Neanderthals mated with modern humans much earlier than previously thought




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.