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. Stones Did Not Help Dinosaurs' Digestion
The researchers believe, instead of stones, the intestines of dinosaurs were formed in such a way that food was retained for a very long time to improve the digestive process.
The researchers believe, instead of stones, the intestines of dinosaurs were formed in such a way that food was retained for a very long time to improve the digestive process.
by staff writers
Tubingen, Germany (UPI) Dec 20, 2006
German scientists say their research suggests the idea that dinosaurs swallowed stones to help them digest food might be incorrect.

Many dinosaurs had narrow, pointed teeth that were more suited to tearing off plants rather than chewing them. So many researchers assumed the giant animals were helped by stones they swallowed, which acted as a kind of gastric mill.

But Oliver Wings of the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Tubingen, and Martin Sander from the University of Bonn have cast doubt on the theory.

For the study, the scientists offered stones such as limestone, rose quartz and granite as food to ostriches -- relatives of dinosaurs.

After the ostriches had been slaughtered, the scientists investigated the gastric stones. It became clear the stones wore out quickly in the muscular stomach and were not polished. That suggests they were not remains of a gastric mill, Sander said.

The researchers believe, instead of stones, the intestines of dinosaurs were formed in such a way that food was retained for a very long time to improve the digestive process.

The study is detailed in the current issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society.

Related Links
Darwin Today At TerraDaily.com

South Korean Scientists To Try Monkey Cloning
Seoul (UPI) Dec 20, 2006
A team led by a South Korean scientist said it would soon attempt to perform the world's first cloning of a monkey. "We are working on the mechanism of stimulating female monkey ovulation to gain eggs en masse, the minimal-must for cloning," team leader Chang Kyu-tae, of the Korea National Primate Research Center, said Wednesday.

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