Earth Science News  





. Study Finds No Safe Level For Ozone

"Over 100 million people in the United States live in areas that exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone. Elevated concentrations of ozone are also a growing concern for rapidly developing nations with rising levels of ozone from expanding transportation networks," said Francesca Dominici, co-author of the study and associate professor of biostatistics at Johns Hopkins.
by Staff Writers
New Haven CN (SPX) Feb 16, 2006
Even at very low levels, ozone--the principal ingredient in smog--increases the risk of premature death, according to a nationwide study to be published in the April edition of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

The study, sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Centers for Disease Control, found that if a safe level for ozone exists, it is only at very low or natural levels and far below current U.S. and international regulations. A 10 part-per-billion increase in the average of the two previous days' ozone levels is associated with a 0.30 percent increase in mortality.

The current study builds on research published in November 2004 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which was the first national study of ozone and mortality.

"This study investigates whether there is a threshold level below which ozone does not affect mortality. Our findings show that even if all 98 counties in our study met the current ozone standard every day, there would still be a significant link between ozone and premature mortality," said Michelle Bell, lead investigator on the study and assistant professor of environmental health at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. "This indicates that further reductions in ozone pollution would benefit public health, even in areas that meet regulatory requirements."

Researchers found that even for days that currently meet the EPA limit for an acceptable level of ozone--80 parts per billion for an eight-hour period--there was still an increased risk of death from the pollutant.

An effort is now under way by the EPA to consider whether more stringent standards for ozone are needed. The agency is mandated to set regulations for ozone under the Clean Air Act. Ozone, a gas that occurs naturally in the upper atmosphere, is created in the lower atmosphere when vehicle and industrial emissions react with sunlight. Levels typically rise when sunlight and heat are highest in the summer.

"Over 100 million people in the United States live in areas that exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone. Elevated concentrations of ozone are also a growing concern for rapidly developing nations with rising levels of ozone from expanding transportation networks," said Francesca Dominici, co-author of the study and associate professor of biostatistics at Johns Hopkins.

Related Links
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Chirac Lifts Warship Hurdle Ahead Of Asian Tour
Paris, France (AFP) Feb 15, 2006
French President Jacques Chirac leads a high-level delegation on a state visit to Thailand and India Thursday -- after cutting short the saga over an asbestos-lined French warship that had threatened to mar the trip.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Cornell, WCMC And LockMart To Create Plan To Manage Mass Casualties In Disasters
  • Experiment To Test Crisis Planning
  • US Hands Over Kashmir Relief Equipment To Pakistan
  • Damning Report Says Katrina Response A 'National Failure'

  • Ancient Climate Studies Suggest Earth On Fast Track To Global Warming
  • Antarctic Snow Inaccurate Temperature Archive
  • The Oceans As Carbon Dioxide Sinks: Increasing Our Understanding
  • Plant Enzyme Efficiency May Hold Key To Global Warming

  • ALOS Captures First Image of Fujiyama
  • Southern Greenland Glaciers Dumping Ice Faster
  • NASA Satellite Technology Helps Fight Invasive Plant Species
  • NASA, UNH Scientists Uncover Lost Maya Ruins From Space

  • Walker's World: EU's Bold Caucasus Bid
  • Garbage Truck Industry Ponders Move To LNG
  • Nuclear Fusion On A Tabletop
  • China Energy Quest Not A Threat

  • New Influenza Vaccine Takes Weeks To Mass Produce
  • Bird Flu Hits Western Europe
  • Bird Flue Hits Africa
  • 1,500 Cholera Cases In Flood-Hit Mozambique

  • Next Good Dinosaur News Likely To Come From Small Packages
  • Sex, Cleaner Of Genomes
  • Phytoplankton Bounce Back From Abrupt Climate Change
  • The Persistence Of Anti-Predator Behavior

  • Study Finds No Safe Level For Ozone
  • Chirac Lifts Warship Hurdle Ahead Of Asian Tour
  • A Microbial Biotechnology Prescription For Global Environmental Health
  • France Under Pressure To Bring Home Asbestos Warship

  • Brain Researchers Discover The Evolutionary Traces Of Grammar
  • Most Cave Art The Work Of Teens, Not Shamans
  • New Analysis Shows Three Human Migrations Out Of Africa
  • Brain Changes Significantly After Age Eighteen

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement