Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Earth Science News .




WOOD PILE
Study of Brazilian Amazon shows 50,000 km of road was built in just three years
by Simon Levey for ICL News
London, UK (SPX) Oct 31, 2013


The researchers hope that these findings will improve our understanding of how land use is changing around the world, and help predict deforestation more accurately.

Although road-building is a major contributor to deforestation and habitat loss, the way in which road networks develop is still poorly understood. A new study is among the first to measure the number of roads built in a rainforest ecosystem over an extended period of time.

It was published this month in the journal Regional Environmental Change by researchers including two Life Scientists from Imperial College London. They say studies like this will help combat future deforestation by allowing for more accurate predictions of where it might occur.

Even though roads often occupy less than 2 per cent of a country's land surface, they may have an ecological impact on an area up to ten times as large. These indirect effects can include changes in air and soil temperature and moisture, as well as restrictions on the movement of animals.

Research co-author Dr Rob Ewers, of Imperial's Department of Life Sciences, said: "Knowing where the roads are and the speed at which they are built is key to predicting deforestation.

"A number of models currently exist which rely on this knowledge, but there are no good studies of how quickly roads get built and where they go when they are built.

"An understanding of road networks is the big missing gap in our ability to predict the future of this region."

Members of the research team used pre-existing road maps and satellite imagery to track the evolution of the Brazilian Amazon road network over a period of three years, in collaboration with IMAZON, the Amazon Institute of People and the Environment.

They found that road networks spread most quickly in regions with high economic growth, as well as in areas where new settlements were being built. Once a region had an extensive network of roads in place, however, the rate of building slowed down.

The researchers hope that these findings will improve our understanding of how land use is changing around the world, and help predict deforestation more accurately.

Dr Ewers is currently working on the SAFE (Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems) project, one of the world's largest ecological experiments underway in Borneo.

He and his team will observe the planned logging of a tropical forest under controlled, experimental conditions. Careful observation of how the ecosystem becomes disrupted and breaks down when it is damaged will yield information crucial to future conservation efforts.

Dr Ewers spoke about the project to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge when they travelled through south-east Asia in the summer of 2012. This work is funded by the Grantham Institute for Climate Change.

"Temporal patterns of road network development in the Brazilian Amazon" was published in Regional Environmental Change by Sadia E Ahmed, Carlos M Souza Jr, Julia Riberio and Robert M Ewers. DOI: 10.1007/s10113-012-0397-z

.


Related Links
Imperial College London
Forestry News - Global and Local News, Science and Application






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WOOD PILE
Local communities produce high-quality forest monitoring data, rivals that of professional foresters
Oslo, Norway (SPX) Oct 31, 2013
As global forest and climate experts gather at the Oslo REDD Exchange 2013 to ramp up international efforts to protect carbon-storing forests in the developing world, a recent study by researchers at the Nairobi-based World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and European and Southeast Asian institutions finds that local communities-using simple tools like ropes and sticks-can produce forest carbon data ... read more


WOOD PILE
Space technologies boost disaster reduction int'l co-op

How to Manage Nature's Runaway Freight Trains

Uruguay to pull peacekeepers from Haiti: president

Storm-battered northern Europe slowly gets back to normal

WOOD PILE
Historic Demonstration Proves Laser Communication Possible

UNC neuroscientists discover new 'mini-neural computer' in the brain

Birthing a new breed of materials

Unique chemistry in hydrogen catalysts

WOOD PILE
Dublin faces water rationing after serious treatment plant problem

UCLA report urges new global policy effort to tackle crisis of plastic litter in oceans

Study maps human impacts on top ocean predators along US west coast

El Nino is becoming more active

WOOD PILE
Greenpeace says Russia moving jailed activists to St Petersburg

Vast Antarctic sanctuary plans fail

Melting Arctic sea ice could increase summer rainfall in northwest Europe

Families ask Ottawa to demand Russia release activists

WOOD PILE
Drink it while you can, as wine shortage looms: study

Second GM corn set for EU approval after Court ruling: EU sources

For fish and rice to thrive in Yolo Bypass, 'just add water'

Brazil energy, farm incentives fuel CO2 emissions

WOOD PILE
Floods kill 48 in eastern India: report

Fukushima workers evacuated as small tsunami hits Japan

Japan mudslide islanders take shelter as new storm looms

Philippine earthquake creates miles-long rocky wall

WOOD PILE
Street art takes on street waste in Libreville

Dutch to send 380 troops to Mali

Egypt military court gives journalist suspended jail term

Ghana arrests 46 more foreigners over illegal gold mining

WOOD PILE
Study: Humans made sophisticated stone tools earlier than thought

Did hard-wired fear of snakes drive evolution of human vision?

Hair regeneration method is first to induce new human hair growth

No known hominin is ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement