Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Earth Science News .




WATER WORLD
Study suggests expanded concept of 'urban watershed'
by Staff Writers
Baltimore, MD (SPX) Jun 21, 2012


File image.

Within two decades, 60 percent of the world's population will live in cities, and coping with the resulting urban drinking water and sanitation issues will be one of the greatest challenges of this century. A U.S. Forest Service study recently published in Urban Ecosystems proposes an expanded view of the complex world of urban water.

The study presents a new conceptual framework that addresses characteristics of watersheds that are affected by urban land uses, including:

+ hydrologic connectivity between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems that alters transport and transformation processes within watersheds at multiple spatial and temporal dimensions,

+ unique characteristics and challenges of recognizing engineered headwaters as part of ecosystems and linkages to larger order streams and receiving waters,

+ changes in the relationship between urban infrastructure and watershed material transport and transformation over time.

"Urban ecosystems are a critical part of the landscape and influence the environmental health of entire regions," according to Michael T. Rains, director of the Northern Research Station.

"Forest Service research is contributing to meeting the needs of cities and the responsible stewardship of urban natural resources."

Co-authors Ken Belt, a hydrologist/aquatic ecologist with the Forest Service's Northern Research Station, and Sujay Kaushal, an assistant professor with the University of Maryland's Department of Geology and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, describe urban watersheds as four dimensional eco-hydrologic entities that function in space and time.

Much of that space is below ground, where thousands of miles of pipes, including storm, sewer and water pipes, are routing water in and out of buildings and ultimately between and across watersheds.

How deep pipes are located, how much they leak and what they are leaking creates a complicated underground system that has great implications for above-ground stream ecosystems and the people who depend on them, according to Belt and Kaushal.

Time is also an important factor in a larger perspective on urban water. Urban watersheds experience tremendous change over time, both above ground and within their underground networks. Buildings and human activities change on the surface, and trees benefitting from leaked water grow and their root systems extend deep into the subsurface.

Below ground, the huge network of pipes ages and changes as technologies and regulatory environments change. These watershed changes exert large effects on their receiving streams.

"The immense engineered urban water network has effectively expanded the natural drainage system of watersheds in ways that profoundly change the stream ecosystems they are connected to," Belt said.

.


Related Links
USDA Forest Service - Northern Research Station
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
New research into flood impacts in the south of England
Southampton UK (SPX) Jun 19, 2012
Research from the University of Southampton has developed and applied a method for understanding the effects and impacts of coastal flooding, which could contribute to more effective flood forecasting, defence design and land use planning. By using observations from real coastal floods and numerical models, researchers simulated coastal floods within the Solent region of the South of Engla ... read more


WATER WORLD
Population displacement during disasters predicted using mobile data

Japan sorry for not using US radiation map

Nearly 15 million people displaced by disasters in 2011

Experts discuss better nuclear disaster communication

WATER WORLD
Samsung launches new phone in US, taking on Apple

China defends rare earths policy

Apple fined $2.29 mln over Australian '4G' iPad

Space is Big, But Getting Smaller

WATER WORLD
Study suggests expanded concept of 'urban watershed'

Oracle chief buys Hawaiian island

Nature inspires new submarine design

Arctic methane gas could spell trouble for Florida coastline

WATER WORLD
Paul McCartney, Penelope Cruz join 'Arctic sanctuary' drive

Arctic once had extreme warm periods: study

Spanish Scientist Participate in the Most Comprehensive Study Ever Done on Ice

Warm Climate - Cold Arctic?

WATER WORLD
Link between vitamin C and twins can increase seed production in crops

Over 30 years of global soil moisture observations for climate applications

Key part of plants' rapid response system revealed

Researchers search for viruses to save honeybees

WATER WORLD
Chris becomes season's first Atlantic hurricane

Thousands evacuated as storm strikes Taiwan

UN says Afghan quakes killed 75

One dead as powerful typhoon cuts across Japan

WATER WORLD
'I was shot for defying Kagame', says Rwanda's ex-army boss

Rwanda's ex-army boss testifies of betrayal in murder bid

Lions on the loose in Kenyan capital's urban jungle

US expanding secret spy bases in Africa: report

WATER WORLD
Google sets out to save dying languages

Adaptable decision making in the brain

The Rare Biosphere of the Human Body

Expanding waistlines threaten the planet: researchers




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement